Is eye of round beef roast hopeless?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by rpooley, Mar 8, 2016.

  1. rpooley

    rpooley

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    I've tried lots of different recipes for this, most seem to suggest high heat, but to no avail.  It's still only 'ok' and not particularly tender.

    Sous vide aside, any suggestions?  I'd love to make this cheap beefy cut work.

    Again, no sous vide in the house so it's not worth suggesting.

    Thanks
     
  2. mike9

    mike9

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    I and I know of several others here who have good success with eye of round using several different techniques.  Some slow roast it I prefer to blast cook mine @ 500 degrees for 5 minutes/pound then turn the oven off and don't open that door for 2hrs.  
     
  3. annieskitchen

    annieskitchen

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    Roast it and slice paper thin to produce deli roast beef.
     
  4. Iceman

    Iceman

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    I'm curious here ... Just how many people have the ability to cut, by hand, anything like a roast, "paper thin"
     
  5. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Wrap the roast in beet fat, and tie it on with string.  I usually get beef fat from prime rib fat caps.  Roast per normal, ie 350 F 

    Old school is to lard the roast with strips of fat.  For this you need a larding needle, you push this though the roast, attach a strip of fat at the end that pokes through, and draw this strip back through the roast.  Strips about 1/8" square, every square inch or so.
     
  6. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I love this cut of meat, it makes such a beautiful roast. But it has to be done right. I religiously follow the Americas Tesr Kitchen method of doing an overnight dry brine then I wear it and put it in a low oven for an hour and then turn off the oven and leave it on there for an hour. Perfect every time.

     
  7. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    There's only one way to get this. It doesn't cost that much to get Sous Vide in your home. Sorry, I couldn't stand by and watch you eat something that you find unexceptable. 

     
  8. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Hi @ChefBillyB that looks more like a bottom round than a eye round.
     
  9. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    Yes, it's a Bottom Round roast. What I wanted to show was with no fat cap and a lean piece of meat you can still get tender. This is a Eye of the round cooked the same way with no fat cap. The problem with dry heat is it doesn't do a lean roast like this and favors. I could see most people having problems roasting an E of R for that reason. When I cooked top rounds for Buffets I told my carves to slice thin to see a more tender piece of meat. The top rounds I had were 24 to 26 lbs each with a nice fat cap. The only other way is to wrap it in fat. I have roasted Buffalo roasts like that.

     
  10. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    I did a nice eye a while back, it's not impossible. Too lean for me though. Seared in a hot pan, seasoned and into 375 oven until desired temp.

     
  11. rpooley

    rpooley

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    @Koukouvagia   I agree with the ATK comment.  It's the method that has the best, if still not perfect, result for me.

    No time for the salt today but the slow roast turned out something decent.

    The leftovers are always better when turned into boulettes or hachis parmentier anyway.  :)
     
  12. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I admit I've never tried sous vide food, never seen it on a menu. From what I see on TV and in pictures sous vide food does not look appetizing to me.

    @chefbuba I know what you mean about it being too lean. That's why it needs a really nice gravy or sauce with plenty of butter in it. That photo I posted I served it au jus which I left out of the picture. Still not sure how to photograph sauces.
     
  13. rpooley

    rpooley

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    @Koukouvagia    Sous vide can be nice but I also think there is still something to cooking that requires more attention and skill.

    Yes, it is a lean cut but it is also cheap.  Cooking over the ages has often been at it's heart frugality and thrift.
     
  14. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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     Koukouvagia, The two roasts I showed above are wonderful doing Sous Vide. If the roasts had nice marbling and a fat cap I would still take roasting over Sous Vide. So for me it's all about what the piece of meat offers me in the raw state then I decide how to process it. The Roasts in the above post IMHO are better for French dips, the meat is melt in your mouth tender. If the meat is heated in a fry pay with a bit of butter for a minute it tastes like a steak sandwich. Taking all this into account when all conditions are right I would take a dry heat method of roasting. I think the fat breaks down different in dry heat and the meats natural juices leave you with a better taste. IMHO a person should pick the method of cooking depending on what the meat is offering in Texture and fat. 

       I did these dbl cut pork chops sous vide and then flame broiled using an apple glaze for a nice tasting outside crust. The inside was already cooked and up to temp. What Sous Vide gave me was the opportunity to have the thick inside center cooked and still juicy without over cooking the outside. So, to make a long story short, when I look at a piece of meat it tells me how it should be cooked to give me the best end results..........

     
  15. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Sous vide is a technique and it does require attention and skill. I've always wanted to try it but like I said I've never seen it on a menu and I've never been attracted to the type of restaurants that would likely have it. So I can't speak to the taste or texture but visually it has the appeal of boiled meat.
     
  16. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    It's a good cut to make jerky
     
  17. blickjagger

    blickjagger

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    Slow cook covered at 300F until it's almost to desired temp, then take your lid off and finish getting some nice color. I would recommend slicing thin though
     
  18. mike9

    mike9

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    "paper thin" is a carver's fantasy.  I can slice rested beef quite thin - all one needs is a stupid sharp slicer, some real experience and a working knowledge of the product.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2016