is a community school for pastry arts good? I will get A.A.S.

22
10
Joined Feb 15, 2010
so I got accepted to sullivan
however a school near me has a good program
and well it will be more affordable for me
are they as good?
 
183
12
Joined Dec 16, 2008
 Ashley,

It's a good question but all colleges are different.  If you could name the community college in your area, it would be easier for someone to answer your question.  

In the end, a good program is a good program regardless of whether it is proprietary or a community college.  I know some proprietary colleges that are terrible and some that are amazing and worth the price. The same can be said of community colleges.  
 
182
19
Joined Mar 3, 2010
lol tahts cool I'm at Sullivan right now. in my opinion its what you get out of it and how much you out into it. yeah some of the best schools like CIA or JW are good schools to attend but if u network and give 100 percent and participate in events and connect with the chefs you can open doors for yourself. one of my chefs, who is very good, used to teach courses in a local community college in my city. only u can decide the right moves for yourself.

I'm attended Sullivan in Louisville the culinary arts program and i tell you what i had some good times and lots of fun. they have some great chefs who will guide you. if you decide to attend Sullivan and have questions pm me ill answer your questions. i put 100% and got what i want, i hate that I'm leaving cause the chefs and the classes were fun and the last few quarters i learned the most, which ever chef you end up having tell them u talked to Surge, they all know me and probably laugh when you tell them that lol. I'm about to graduate in 3 months and wish it went slower and more lab times and more classes during the week. after baking quarter you enter garde manager and after that it flies. my favorite was international and advance tech.  its a great experience and lots of time to network and learn. if you get the right chef you will end up having fun and learning a great deal of info,eh id say most of them are laid back but know a great deal and you will get what you put in.

edit: the baking and pastry department is a different story and i didn't even realize it till now and got carried AWAY but i don't know much about it but most of the chefs their have knowledge.yo u will have basic which i know the chefs cause its more culinary but after that you are in the baking side. it fun either way, come down and check it out they do tours. ill be their in plus Fridays in k3 from 8-12 let me know.
 
Last edited:
143
12
Joined Apr 6, 2010
From what I'm told (I'm also at community college) a lot of kitchens will look to see if you just have a degree (no matter what type) and will focus more on your skill and professionalism.
 
183
12
Joined Dec 16, 2008
 Zane,

That is true that sometimes the degree doesn't matter but there are some schools that don't cover professionalism, the reality of the industry, or even actual real time kitchen skills that you can apply in the real world.  

In the end, it's all about doing the research and asking industry professionals, not just people that work for the colleges.  
 
143
12
Joined Apr 6, 2010
 Zane,

That is true that sometimes the degree doesn't matter but there are some schools that don't cover professionalism, the reality of the industry, or even actual real time kitchen skills that you can apply in the real world.  

In the end, it's all about doing the research and asking industry professionals, not just people that work for the colleges.  
I agree. I'm just lucky that my culinary program has some head chefs as teachers. One was the head Chef of the Bellagio and is now a consultant for a major local restaurant. But it is always a good idea to go out of your element and try to build a network early, because sometimes your break can come from who you know.
 

Latest posts

Top Bottom