iodine

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by chouxbacca, Oct 25, 2001.

  1. chouxbacca

    chouxbacca

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    well guys, I recently had a problem with both monkfish, and lobster. The monkfish i had purchased had a strange iodine like smell when I cooked it. This I don't know was a result oif not properly cleaning the fish from it's thick, slimy membrane, or due to being out of water (ie. dead) for too long. and When I bought the frozen lobster (which had been cooked in the store) it too had the same smell of iodine, but it nearly made me sick. It stuck with me after I ate it (I wouldn't have had it been today) and made me quite nautious(sp?) but if anyone knows why for sure this happened, or how it can be in the future prevented i would appreciate your information.
     
  2. cabal

    cabal

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    It could be just that the seafood comes from a contaminated batch. seafood is rich in iodine anyway but what you described sounds unusual.
     
  3. sisrst

    sisrst

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    Are you sure the smell was iodine, or maybe ammonia. I am not
    sure what Iodine would smell like, but ammonia is a natural
    product of protien breakdown. In either case I would not eat.
     
  4. chouxbacca

    chouxbacca

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    thanks, ammonia is what I mean, and I will not eat again either. eew, :eek:
     
  5. cabal

    cabal

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    Eeeeeeeew ammonia it is huh? well, the food has definitely gone way past its shelf life. Some sharks and rays have that smell inherent in its flesh though and it can be helped by soaking in milk. but lobster smelling of ammonia........... i will pass.