Ikkanshi Tadatsuna

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by jrla, May 12, 2013.

  1. jrla

    jrla

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    Hello,

    Been lurking in the background for 9 months.  Researching and learning....based on what I have read I went down the the IT Inox route.

    Been very happy with 240mm WaGyuto, 150mm Petty and 240mm Slicer from Aframes Tokyo.  Also bought some Shapton Glassstones as advised by Takeshi.

    I am very keen to keep all my Japanese knifes to just one maker, IT.

    Does anyone recommend any of the other IT knifes?  The advice so far has worked out really well! 

    Thanks

    JRLA
     
  2. duckfat

    duckfat

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    I have a Western handled IT Inox 270mm Suj. If I had a Mulligan on that I'd go with a 300mm instead. I also have a 120mm petty and 185mm Gyuto. The small Gyuto is unique and very handy. I grab it just as often as any of the 240mm+ Gyuto's in my kit. Congrats on starting with some great knives.

    Dave
     
  3. jrla

    jrla

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    Thanks Dave. Sorry for slow reply. I have destroyed my cleaver on some beef ribs so I need a new one - is there anything you suggest.? I have also always fancied a Deba but I don't really see how I can get good value out of it....?

    Cheers James

    Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk 4 Beta
     
  4. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Cleavers are all about brute strength -- emphasis on the brute -- and indestructibility.  If you don't care about sissy things like F&F or appearance and brutishly crude is good enough, Old Hickory is A No. 1, breaker of champions, proudly made in the U. S. of A, tons of fun, and cheap too.  Made-in-China (an okay country, but let's face it, not the home of rock and roll) CCK cleavers are good for the same reasons, but a lot more expensive for a less good alloy.  

    Between CCK and Old HIckory the best you can say about CCK is that you don't have to sand the splinters out of the handles before using them.   Otherwise, Old Hickory.  Did I mention "brutishly crude?"

    If you want decent finish, stainless steel, and all that other stuff, the commercial quality cleaver range starts and ends with Forschner by Victorinox.  They ain't cheap, and it doesn't make sense to spend more.

    There are limits to what a cleaver should do.  If you're going through beef ribs, use a saw -- preferably a sawzall.  Franklin and Tesla went to a lot of trouble inventing electricity, there's no reason you shouldn't avail yourself of it.  Hacking away at thick bones with a heavy knife or hatchet will destroy your board, if not your knife.

    BDL
     
  5. duckfat

    duckfat

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    Beef ribs are a bit much for most knives. There are cleavers and then there are cleavers! LOL Most cleavers or even western Debas are not up to the task for beef ribs. Buy a bone saw if you need to get through beef ribs. They available at many butcher supply stores.  If you are inclined towards power tools use the right tool for the job and that's a band saw. They now make smaller portable units but a good ole bone saw still works just ducky.

    For cleavers Dexter still makes a very good light use (veggies) cleaver. CCK is pretty much the standard for value cleavers and they offer a wide range of options. If you want better FF then look to Sugimoto or Hattori but the price points are much higher.

    Dave