Ice Cream

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by chrisbristol, Mar 13, 2014.

  1. chrisbristol

    chrisbristol

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    Hello

    I wanted to start making ice cream.  Chocolate is my favourite.

    I don't know anything about making it so a few questions.

    First of all why do you need to an ice cream maker?  Secondly can you make nice ice cream without one and if so does anyone have any good recipe's?

    Thank you
     
  2. teamfat

    teamfat

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    I've got a little Donvier ice cream maker, use it once or twice a year.  If I were more into sweets and desserts I'd use it more.  The thing with making ice cream is to keep it moving as it chills.  The goal is very, very small ice crystals, keeping the mix agitated so large crystals don't have a chance to form, which ruin the creamy texture.  One of the best things I have ever eaten is a peach sorbet made from the peaches picked from the tree we had years ago.  It got sick and died, I keep thinking about replacing it.

    It might be possible to come up with some sort of device that will allow you to keep the mixture moving and keep it below freezing during the process, but if you are talking about just a few cups of home made stuff now and again, there are dedicated products out there in the 20 - 30 dollar range that do a good job.

    mjb.
     
  3. coren

    coren

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    My family informs me that I'm making icecream a few times a year for events (birthdays, etc).  I own a couple of the little Cuisinart machines for this reason.  You just pre-freeze the canisters ahead of time, and they're extremely easy to use.

    The basic recipe I use is:

    1 cup milk

    3/4 cup sugar

    4 egg yolks

    pinch salt

    1 tbsp vanilla

    2 cups heavy cream

    Start by combining the milk, salt, and sugar over low heat.  Once it's up around 100F degrees, pour a bit into your yolks and stir them around (break them up, bring them up in temp), then pour all of that into your pan.  I use a little clip-on thermometer for the next part: slowly bring the temperature up to around 175F degrees.  Stir frequently, using a spatula so you don't let any collect on the bottom of the pan. 

    Once the mixture is at 175F, strain it through a fine sieve.  Add the vanilla and cream, and toss it in the refrigerator overnight.  The next day freeze according to the instructions (usually takes mine around 20-25 minutes).

    For flavors other than vanilla, add chunky stuff AFTER you freeze it, and add things like extracts, liqueurs, and spices before refrigerating.

    For instance, one of the preferred alterations (in my family) is irish cookies and cream.  Sub 1.5 tbsp baileys for the vanilla before freezing.  After it's done, break up a bunch of oreos and mix them in.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2014
  4. chrisbristol

    chrisbristol

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    So basically if I don't use an ice cream maker I may end up with very icy ice cream?  Kind of like an ice cream that has been left uncovered?
     
  5. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    If you have a Kitchen Aid mixer, there is a special bowl available that you freeze ahead of time and use with the paddle attachment which produces pretty good ice cream.