Ice Carving...........

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by cakerookie, Feb 26, 2006.

  1. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    I hope I am putting this in the right place. But I found some real interesting information on the web about ice carving and was wondering if the chefs that do this sort thing are taught in culinary school or is it just something kind of like sugar work that chefs pick up on. Some of the pieces are huge and take cranes to lift in place.
     
  2. chrose

    chrose

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    There are books on the subject and I'm sure there are some kind of classes somewhere, but I think by and large it's picked up through working with someone who does it and teaching themselves. It's really basic sculpture with a different medium so I imagine sculpting classes at a local college would help. The knives and saws if you get the good ones are mind bogglingly expensive. Look for Japanese books on the subject, they are phenomenal.
     
  3. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    Thanks CH. Haven't heard from you in a while. How ya doin?
     
  4. cape chef

    cape chef

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    We did not have ice carving classes in school, although you could sign up for specific weekend classes (no credits). I learned ice carving through hotels when they were a big deal for almost any occasion. Like Chrose said, the japanese are truly amazing in this art.
     
  5. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    Thanks capechef. HAAAAAAAAAAAAA just another avenue to explore in the fine arts of the culinary world. Neat thing about food you can play with it then eat it if you don't burn it first>>>>>>>>>>:lol:
     
  6. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    The basic designs are quite easy once you learn them. There's sort of a template and there's not much fine detail going in. A good teacher can break it down for you. Things like pineapple vase for instance is just two cuts down each side, score the pineapple pattern, make the crown and carve a hole big enough on the top for the flowers.

    A swan is also pretty simple. Remember thouse choux paste swans that looked so cool when you were a rookie but then when you learned how to make it they were so simple? Just like that.

    Wear steel toes and eye protection. You can get by with an electric chainsaw and basic woodworking chisels. When you get better you might want to invest in better tools.
     
  7. panini

    panini

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    I learned back, when all ice had a core. Back then, the idea was to design ,without messing with the air in that core.
    I have been called upon to carve a few times in the past 2 years and have found the clear blocks to be a whole new medium. I was actually able to play with added materials like pictures,art, laminated, and welded between two pieces. We have a well know carver here in Dallas, Robert Bifulco. He owns Vanishing Ice Sculptures. A great school for Ice. A lot of area chefs carve and have studied with Robert.
    I think the most important thing that I learned was exageration in detail.
    Many yrs. ago I work along side some Japanese carvers. Spectacular detail. I would come close on the detail and couldn'tfigure out why their ice looked so much better on display. One of the old timers told me to get very detailed but exagerate it so it remains longer on the melt.
    Anyway, there is a national association of ice arvers (NICA) if someones interested.
    pan