I went down last night, what can i improve?

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12
Joined May 28, 2013
Sweat and work as hard as possible during prep. Once the rush comes just try to stay as methodical as possible. No wasted movements. Shutting down will not accomplish anything. Most likely the cook beside you is struggling too. He's just use to it
 
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10
Joined Aug 14, 2016
This little trick has helped me in years past. When you go to bed reflect on service. Replay it and visualize your movements. Think of your mistakes and then visualize how you would fix them.This all helps me commit the actions to long term memory.

I often dream of service. I feel like it's practice.
 
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Joined Aug 18, 2016
This is my favorite saying " Plan your work and work your plan. ". This is a philosophy that has guided me through my 25 year career as a Chef.  From the time I was a line cook until just today.  I prep well for the shift and the day before.  Write your own prep list on a pocket note tablet that you keep with you.  Ask questions to the front of the house..." how many reservations?  How many tops are we expecting tonight ?  This will mentally prepare you for the day.  Keep your mise en place organized.  Have a back up for everything and touch every item that is on the menu, that could be ordered from your station.  Have a back up or every item and raw ingredients and a cutting board at arms rach , in case you get slammed and need to slam out some onions or something.

A positive attitude and keeping a strong pace all day in the kitchen is key. Make your prep list so that the tasks that take longest are started first and work backwards towards service time..  Keep calm under pressure and take deep breaths often.  Hydrate yourself. Listen and learn.  To the other cooks, chef and servers.  Each day you grow if you have what it takes.

Best of luck to you

I hope you find enjoyment in it as I have in my life.

Chef Dave
 
9
10
Joined Jul 14, 2015
 
This is my favorite saying " Plan your work and work your plan. ". This is a philosophy that has guided me through my 25 year career as a Chef.  From the time I was a line cook until just today.  I prep well for the shift and the day before.  Write your own prep list on a pocket note tablet that you keep with you.  Ask questions to the front of the house..." how many reservations?  How many tops are we expecting tonight ?  This will mentally prepare you for the day.  Keep your mise en place organized.  Have a back up for everything and touch every item that is on the menu, that could be ordered from your station.  Have a back up or every item and raw ingredients and a cutting board at arms rach , in case you get slammed and need to slam out some onions or something.

A positive attitude and keeping a strong pace all day in the kitchen is key. Make your prep list so that the tasks that take longest are started first and work backwards towards service time..  Keep calm under pressure and take deep breaths often.  Hydrate yourself. Listen and learn.  To the other cooks, chef and servers.  Each day you grow if you have what it takes.

Best of luck to you

I hope you find enjoyment in it as I have in my life.

Chef Dave
Seriously I just love this so much.  I swear Chef's have been the most inspiring people I've ever heard/met in my life.  Thank you for sharing this. 
 
12
10
Joined Jan 1, 2014
i can really relate to this i started on cold section in a bistro i had 10 starters and 5 deserts under my belt along with 1 section head AKA  cdp  so 

 learnt the way etc the first night i was alone on the section

 wednesdy night i did service fucked up alot ...kept mistiming orders to fast too slow....

what im getting at is one really needs to be in the moment in every sense you need to be very tuned in   in a busy kitchen cause your chef will bark orders left and right if you cant mentally remember i use to do this trick i use to take out 1 basic mis en place of every dish barked . and  in the order it is supposed to go..once you start getting accustomed to the sequence of things its muscle memory 
 
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