I was bored today so I decided to make a basic lemon tart

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by pollopicu, May 29, 2013.

  1. pollopicu

    pollopicu

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    and unbeknownst to me I chose a recipe by Pierre Herme, whom up until now wasn't really familiar with, until I visited his site and it hit me....he's the famous macaroon pastry chef in Paris. The reason I looked him up is because when I tasted the lemon cream I couldn't believe my mouth. It was honest to God the most delicious dessert cream I ever tasted, probably the best dessert, period, ever.

    I needed to share this so anyone who is ever looking for a lemon cream knows where to go.

    http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2008/04/lemon-lemon-lemon-cream-recipe.html

    I just wish I could make my mini tarts to look like his, so this week I'll be off to purchase some tart molds and perfect my dessert presentation skills which are desperately lacking.

    Wondering is anyone else here has made this cream?
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2013
  2. goldilocks

    goldilocks

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    Thank you for posting that recipe, it sounds lovely!!!  I have printed to try at home.

    My mouth is watering already /img/vbsmilies/smilies/licklips.gif
     
  3. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Which brand of tart molds do you prefer?  Me, I use Norpro, the 'old' tin linned stuff along with Fat Daddios anodized aluminum and I notice really no difference in performance between the two brands.  But then, I've been making tarts and quiche since last September.    (...not meaning to hijack this thread)
     
  4. pollopicu

    pollopicu

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    Thanks, Locks :) it's really worth the effort to make them.

    koko, not hijacking at all, this is exactly what this thread is about :) I don't have a preference in bake-ware. not really familiar with what's popular, and or the best quality. I don't really bake that much at all. I go through periods... I know I have the potential to be a much better baker, but it's not really required of me at work, and my husband and I eat pretty healthy, so I don't want to be stuck with all these desserts in the house. Not to mention the cost of ingredients. So very seldom do i try my hand at desserts, although I'd love to make them, if I had unlimited budget and people to give it to I'd be in the kitchen all day long.  I know it sounds like I'm making excuses for lacking in baking skills, and perhaps I am..

    The tart tins I'm interested in purchasing are something like this. Actually, exactly like this:

    [​IMG]

    I ended up using a springform and doing the best I could.

    [​IMG]

    Could've been better...there was shrinkage and a bit of swelling, but the crust itself was very buttery and delicious.

    [​IMG]

    bottom of crust

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    crust recipe I used.

    http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2008/11/the-great-unshrinkable-sweet-tart-shell/

    I'm going to give it a whirl in another couple weeks with all the right tools. I would love to have a product that closely resembles this:

    [​IMG]

    the only thing i would do different in this recipe is cook the crust first, then pour filling directly into crust after it's cooled. I would not refrigerate it first because it doesn't pour out the same as it does the first timer around when the filling is slightly warm. Does that make sense?
     
  5. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    I have a Time-Life cookbook on The Cooking of Germany that includes their version of a tarte.  It uses the typical springform pan.  Talk about a rich tarte dough:

    2C AP Flour

    1/4C sugar  (which kind??)

    2 Egg Yolks

    1 hard cooked egg yolk forced thru a fine sieve

    1/2 pound (2 sticks)  unsalted butter, melted and cooled

    It appears that their proportion of butter to flour approximates that of Pierre Herme.  Approximates!  It's really looking like the following ratio for a truly rich dough:

    1 stick (1/4 pound) butter : 1C flour (1/4 pound)...............Simple!
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2013
  6. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Aaaahhhhh, either tart rings (ring molds) or sourdough muffin molds, available at Amazon in your choice of sizes.  And shrinkage after baking is quite normal.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2013
  7. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Question...

    Meyer lemon trees are notorious for providing a plethora of huge fruits that yield gallons of juice (yes exaggerating, but not by much) which I freeze in mini muff tins and store in air tight containers.

    Give most of it away but I still have scads left and judging by the flowers it will be a bumper crop again this year.

    The juice is a bit sweet and not all that tart.

    I frequently make curd with a recipe written especially for the Meyer variety.

    Here is my question... will the above recipe work with the juice I have or do I need to add a bit of acid (if so at what ratio)?

    Thanks.

    mimi

    Comment for Pollo...the bottom of your tart crust looks amazing!

    m.
     
  8. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    It appears that the top of the tart might have been brushed with a glaze but I really don't know.  Notice how the surface of the glaze covering the filling is continuous when it goes up and over the lime slice.
     
  9. pollopicu

    pollopicu

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    Thank you, Flipgirl :) I'm not sure about the Meyers lemon. I never see them at the markets I shop, and as far as I can recall I don't remember ever buying meyers lemons either, but since I found this recipe I've come to realize how in demand they are. You're lucky.

    koko, yes, that's a tart glaze. Many patesseries use it for their tarts, especially in Paris, I noticed.
     
  10. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Do you have a recipe for the glaze, by chance, or even a link to one like that one as it's nice and clear.
     
  11. pollopicu

    pollopicu

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    I believe this is the glaze Pierre Herme uses.

    Neutral Glaze

    500 g water
    2 already used vanilla beans
    200 g sucrose
    20 g NH pectin
    10 g lemon juice

    Mix the sucrose with the NH pectin, add the water and vanilla beans and bring to a boil for 2 to 3 minutes. Turn off heat, add the lemon juice. Let steep for 30 minutes before straining into a container. Keep refrigerated, reheat before use.

    There's also this product.

    http://www.marquefoods.com/products/natural-neutral-mirror-glaze
     
  12. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Pollopicu:

    I found this info:

    "Here’s a basic lemon mirror suitable for glazing a 9-inch diameter surface. Perhaps this basic recipe may not comply with the level of sophistication in which you regularly work. Yet, it may satisfy the purpose for some, shall we say, less fastidious patissieres...

    1½ tsps unflavored gelatin
    1 fl. oz. purified cold water
    6 fl. oz. boiling water
    1/3 cup superfine sugar
    pinch of salt
    2 fl. oz. strained fresh lemon juice
    Few drops of yellow food coloring (opt.)

    Soften gelatin in cold water. Add boiling water and stir until gelatin is dissolved. Add sugar & salt; stir until dissolved. Blend in citrus juice & coloring. Set bowl in larger vessel filled with ice and let stand until mixture is syrupy and begins to thicken, stirring occasionally, about 30 minutes – do not let set. Brush paper-thin layer of mixture over top of cake (or, I suppose, a bavarian). Refrigerate until set. Pour second layer over; total thickness should not exceed 3/16 inch. Refrigerate until mirror is set to preferred consistency.

    BTW, Ms. Greenspan notes that Chef Hermé’s “Transparent Glaze” -- flavored with lemon, orange, & vanilla -- can be stored airtight in the refrigerator for a week or the freezer for a month.” (p. 38) "      http://forums.egullet.org/topic/108153-neutral-cold-mirror-glaze/

    Don't know if this will help any.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2013
  13. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Don't know how I missed this pastry recipe but so happy I caught it before this thread fades into obscurity!

    I am going with the ASSumption that the sugar is granulated?

    Yes, no , maybe so?

    mimi
     
  14. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Many out there use confectioners sugar and now someone mentioned "superfine" sugar.  What is it?  And I've seen some use regular granulated sugar.  Hmmmm.
     
  15. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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  16. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    In rechecking my Time Life book on The Cooking of Germany, unless specified otherwise, the "sugar" called for is granulated sugar because elsewhere in some recipes the term "confectioner's sugar" is used.
     
  17. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Last edited: Jun 22, 2013