I want my hot dog chili to turn brown!

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by mikiesteve, Aug 6, 2016.

  1. mikiesteve

    mikiesteve

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    I've noticed some of the old time hot dog chili from WV is brown in color and not red. We are talking 70 year old recipes so it's none of the modern ingredients. I tried Kitchen Bouquet but that just gives it a deeper red. Doesn't have any real sauteed ingredients so there must be a trick I am missing. Any ideas?
     
  2. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Just guessing but the chile powder used, especially 70 years ago, probably had a few days on it and as a result was oxidized and somewhat brown (kinda brick colored) in color as opposed to fresher chile powder which would be a brighter red.
     
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  3. mikiesteve

    mikiesteve

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    Is home made chili powder the answer maybe? They still produce the sauce and it is more of a brown color even today. Any chance oit would be as simple as loosening the cap on the container? (Yeah... I'm smiling about that suggestion as well...)
     
  4. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Even today you can find chile powder in stores that is less than fresh and brick colored. You could also spread your chile powder out on plate and let it sit for a few days, not my personal recommendation as you lose flavor... but what the hey?

    You can also make your own chile powder and control the color somewhat dependent upon type of chiles used and whether you toast the chiles prior to grinding.

    Are you using chile powder or chili powder?
     
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  5. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    When my family owned a hot dog shop we made chili that was famous around our parts in ole Virginie.  The secret was to use onion skins in the stock.  You heard it here first.
     
  6. mikiesteve

    mikiesteve

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    Thanks for both replies. It's chili powder and I have found several packers that have a brown variety. Me and my credit card have several on the way to experiment with. Thanks for the input. I'll let you know how that works.
     
  7. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    It's difficult to guess what's going on if you protecting the family secret as tightly as you seem to be doing. How long are you cooking it? My hot dog shop experience had secrets too... But it wasn't the color of the chile powder as much as the cook time.
     
  8. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Look for a chili powder with a high percentage of cumin, that is where the brown is coming from, as opposed to the red you would get if using a chile powder.
     
  9. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    There are browner chiles too. I'm a fan of guajillo which is a dark chile but not too hot.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2016
  10. mike9

    mike9

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  11. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    2 thoughts:

    Many thousands of Hungarians immigrated to WV to work in the coal mines in the 1st part of the 20th century, no doubt clutching packets of paprika as they boarded the boats. (My family's story, in a nutshell.) I'm guessing that is a major way chili powder made its way into WV cooking.  When I was a kid, the goulash we ate was more brown than red from whatever kind of paprika it was my grandmother used.

    @Mike9

    Don't know if you've seen this, but I think this guy actually knows what he's talking about--he's certainly up on his Coney Dog stands in "The D."  Beef Hearts? Who knew?

    http://amazingribs.com/recipes/hot_dogs_and_sausages/detroit_coneys.html
     
  12. mike9

    mike9

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    Thanks Terry - yes I recall beef hearts being used early on probably because it was very cheap.  I can get all I want and will make a batch for Labor Day - thanks for the link  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/drinkbeer.gif  
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2016
  13. laurenlulu

    laurenlulu

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    I add beef base to mine and no tomato product, comes out brown
     
  14. mikiesteve

    mikiesteve

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    Thanks for all the interest. I'll try to answer all the questions here:

    - I'm not protecting an old recipe. Actually just trying to duplicate one.

    - Brown Chili powder is actually mostly a really deep red which makes an odd looking sauce. Have tried numerous and likely will buy more to try. Is there a Chili Powder charity I can donate all the old to? LOL

    - Have tried adding Kitchen Bouquet which was little help...

    - Beef heart.... uf not in MY kitchen...LOL

    -I think the beef broth is do-able. Will try that next...

    -If there is such thing as a browner paprika, I will look for that as well.

    -Cook time is interesting too. Will try lengthening the cook time.

    Any other ideas , just fire them my way. Thanks again for the input...
     
  15. jimyra

    jimyra

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    Try here, I have never ordered from them.  Have you tried browning tomato paste in a little oil for deeper color?
     
  16. daltonj

    daltonj

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    You might check out a YouTube.com channel called 'Food Wishes'. He has a hotdog chili on there that has gone over very well with my family, with one guy even eating a couple of spoonfuls after desert. It turns out pretty brown as well, even though there is no browning of the meat. You dump all the ingredients and liquid in and just cook it till it's all cooked and reduced. The only thing I'd change is the amount of water he uses. Granted it makes the initial stirring to prevent clumping much easier, but to me, it's worth the effort to reduce the amount of time to reduce the liquid to a good chili consistency. I also got a kind of blah taste when I used cheapo chili powder from Aldis.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2016