I want a new ricer

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by kuan, Feb 9, 2019.

  1. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    First, ricer or food mill?

    If ricer, which one would you recommend?

    I know I can't do certain things with a ricer that I could with a food mill. But seems like a ricer is such an easy piece of equipment to use for medium family size mashed potatoes.
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Ricers are drawer hostile. They bork up drawer organization big time if they fit at all. Not that mills are easy to store either.

    I think the versatility if the mill wins out from my perspective.
     
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  3. Transglutaminase

    Transglutaminase

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    Have a Westmark Spaetzle press (S shape) that I also use for ricing spuds - not that I do it that often - prefer a chunky old school masher.
    Agreed, it is a drawer hog, but heavy duty -for thick spaetzle dough.
     
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  4. butzy

    butzy

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  5. Iceman

    Iceman

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    Somewhere back a while ago there was a thread just like this about garlic presses. I showed a pic of the type I use and explained it's value because of it's simplicity. The same goes with potato ricers. SIMPLE. They're cheap too. We're talking $10-$12. I recommend the "all metal" route.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Target, Bed Bath and Beyond and Crate & Barrel are good places to find these.
     
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  6. french fries

    french fries

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    Have you considered using a sieve?

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Iceman

    Iceman

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    Do YOU use one of those? ... Do you use one of those for mashed potatoes?
     
  8. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    I saw a cook at Robuchon using one on mashed potatoes. It looked like a lot of work.
     
  9. french fries

    french fries

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    I have used one (for mashed potatoes) in the past, and since I have nothing now, I'm considering getting one. The other day I made pommes dauphines, and I used a small strainer for the mashed potatoes. It was a bit of work but doable.

    Sieves are not that much work though, as you have a greater surface and a tool to scrape against the mesh, it can go pretty fast.

    The big advantage is that you get the fluffiest, airiest mashed potatoes (vs food mills or ricers).
     
  10. teamfat

    teamfat

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    A garlic press makes the best mashed potatoes. I saw it in a Cheftalk post recently.

    mjb.
     
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  11. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Robouchan always used a ricer, followed by a sieve. Of course on a camping trip he might forego the ricer if all he had were his trusty sieve. The cheap ricers are junk, about $60 and up for heavy die-cast alu. I'm wanting to try Robouchan taters, and a good and fine sieve that would hold up is around $30+on amazon. You need the seive anyways to do a fine job, so seive and masher may be the way.

    Oh that would be fun using a garlic press here mjb, one pinky-tip worth at a time.
     
  12. french fries

    french fries

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  13. Transglutaminase

    Transglutaminase

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    Aiieii!
    An excuse to buy a #50 mesh sieve?
    For that, and would double as an extra fine flour sifter.
    #35 is the finest I now possess.
    I will have to try this PITA recipe! ;-)
    Thanks for sharing! :)
     
  14. rick alan

    rick alan

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    1 part butter to 2 parts potato, what's not to like?
     
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  15. Transglutaminase

    Transglutaminase

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    So, I did it.
    Mill-yes, sieve-didn't bother (it's getting late)
    Almost like a mild perogie filling with the reduced milk/cream/butter.
    I like it..but a bit of a PITA...
    cooking potatoes.jpg Potatoes in ramekins sm.jpg
     
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  16. french fries

    french fries

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    Looks nice!! And yes a good puree takes more work than it would appear at first.
     
  17. rick alan

    rick alan

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    OK I've decided the mill/ricer isn't needed here, just a masher and sieve. Now who makes a sieve that dosen't fall apart when you put a little pressure on it? Has something to set it atop a pot/bowl of various sizes?