I use stainless but...

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Joined Sep 25, 2002
I love the new look of stainless steel, but it seems like a pain in the ole ya ya.

I know I talked/groveled/begged for info on this before (forgive me please), but do any of you use stainless (multi-clad actually) for hash browns? If not, what is the best pan to use for frying stuff like hash browns?

:eek:

Thanks,
Mike
 
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Joined May 26, 2001
I use whatever pan I can get to most easily. :D Sometimes stainless, sometimes enamel (leCreuset), sometimes a 34-year-old Magnalite with most of the non-stick coating worn off. No matter which pan I use, they stick. That's it. They stick. So I just scrape off the crispy stuck bits as well as I can, and then soak the pan.

(The only reason I don't use cast iron is that my only cast iron is a ridged grill pan.)
 

phatch

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I use cast iron. They even stick a bit in teflon, but they stick the least in my cast iron. Oppostie is true of eggs.

Phil
 
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I don't think it makes much difference as to the pan as it is whether you have the pan hot enough when you put the potatoes in it. I use whatever is the right size, and that might be stainless or iron or teflon/aluminum. If I don't let it get hot enough before I put the potatoes in the potatoes stick, But you have to let the potatoes develop a good crust before you attempt to turn them too.
 
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Joined Mar 3, 2002
I dont' often make hash browns any more, but I prefer either basic well seasoned cast iron or LC for anything that takes long steady cooking.

The LC is particularly easy to clean up.
 
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LC = LeCreuset (Susanne referred to it in her post).
AC = All Clad
KA = either Kitchen Aid or King Arthur, depending on context
 
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...so helpful.

I checked out that LC cookware. It looks wonderful; expensive too. :)

Mike
 
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Le Creuset is not that expensive when you consider that it lasts FOREVER. I'm still using a set that I bought in 1970.
 
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Mike, do a search on ChefTalk on cooking equipment before you buy any. There are several threads that will explore the various properties of various kinds of materials and brands that you will find VERY useful. A good cook can use anything that will take the heat and doesn't leak, but it's more pleasureful when you can use something that works best for the purpose at hand.

There are several other discussion groups that get into this. Some of the people from ChefTalk can be found there, too :

chowhound:http://www.chowhound.com/main.html

eGullet: http://forums.egullet.com/ibf/index.php

Cooks Illustrated: http://www.cooksillustrated.com/default.asp

epinions: http://www.epinions.com/hmgd?tab=1

And for an article on copperware see the site by Bouland who posts here; his site it's worth the visit, generally: http://www.hertzmann.com/index.php

Going to these sites will lead you to others you might want to visit and point you in the direction of places to obtain cookware & appliances at good prices. Such as:

http://www.outletsonline.com/index.html

Garage sales, flea markets, discount stores can be an economical source of good cookware if you know what you are looking for.
 
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Joined Sep 25, 2002
I appreciate all that info alexia. :)

I already bought the 10 piece Cuisinart Multiclad set, have a 10" cast iron griddle and bought a Lodge 10 1/2" fry pan with sides :). After rearching the net best as I could, and watching FoodTV every night (hehe) I decided to go in the direction. However, as you may have gathered, I'm a real rookie (next to you all ;) and have had some real struggles knowing how to use the various pieces I have.

I am planning to follow up on every lead you gave me. I adore cooking and am making it my life (I feel like I have no choice lol)

Thank you so much-- in fact thanks to all who have gone out of their way to be helpful. Seems as if you remember quite well how it was/is to be me :)

Mike
 
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