I need some information about Prime-RIB

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by chefcast, Nov 7, 2001.

  1. chefcast

    chefcast

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    Hi, I´m chef from Mexico, last summer I was working in NY, now
    I
    opened my own restaurante here in Mex. And I want to know if you can
    send me
    the recepie of Prime-rib, I will apreciate if you do this for me, thank
    you
    and I´ll be in contact soon.

    :bounce:
     
  2. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Hi Chefcast,

    Here is how I prepare a 109 (prime rib).

    When you order your meat specify if you want "choice" or "prime"
    For prime rib I have no problem with "choice" $2.50 less a # than prime.

    Pre heat your oven (I use a convection) to 325 degrees
    If the meat is netted or tied remove it.
    Pull back the fat flap on the top,This is usally seperated by the meat house.Take a good quility mustard and spread evenly on the meat,season with kosher salt and fresh milled black pepper. Cut about a cup of fresh rosemary and thyme and sprinkle it on the mustard and pat in.Then if you like you can dust with garlic and onion powder then close the fat flap and tie in between the bones. Turn the meat over and seasson with S&P on the bottom.
    Place the roast on top of a medium miropoix and pack it under the sides so it does not burn.
    Place in the oven for appx 3-3 1/2 hours...This is for a 22-24 # rib.
    Cook until the internal temp is 125 degrees.
    Pull from the oven and let rest for 15 minutes.Remove the roast and put the pan on high heat on top of your stove,Deglaze your pan with red wine (4 cups) reduce by half and add a gallon of beef stock ,simmer and check seasoning and adjust, cook for 20 minutes and skim the fat,stain into a clean sauce pan and keep warm.As far as the roast in conserned I remove the bones before service.Some places still serve a bone in "king cut" but for me thats just to much beef and doesn't translate well to the bottom line.
    I also serve yorkshire pudding with the roast.
    I hope this helps
    cc
     
  3. anneke

    anneke

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    Good info CC,
    Hope you don't mind I copied your post and placed it in my 'Basics' folder. It's one of those things I've always done by feel in small quantities but would be puzzled if I had to explain to someone how to do it for a large quantity...
    Thanks!
     
  4. cape chef

    cape chef

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    No Problem Anneke,
    Happy to help
    cc
     
  5. chefcast

    chefcast

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    Cape chef: Thank you very much about your recepie of prime rib, and be sure that you are helping me a lot, i hoe that when you need something just ask me. ok.

    Chefcast
     
  6. cape chef

    cape chef

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    your welcome chefcast
    cc
     
  7. castironcook

    castironcook

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    I am going to try this recipe for Xmas...sounds great...:chef:
     
  8. just jim

    just jim

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    I like that recipe Chef.
    The one thing I would do different is cook at 250 degrees.
    The higher temp gives the rib a nice rind and good color, but I like the lower, slower method for an even doneness throughout.
    When I want a slice of rare, I want it rare from inside to outside, not a bullet of rare that gets more done as you move to the outside.

    A compromise is to crank the heat up at the end to get the nice color.
    You end up with a bit more done on the outer edge, but only about a quarter inch or so.
     
  9. rokoroko

    rokoroko

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    hi,

    one 14 min Prime ribs video recipe is here:

    on icooking dot tv on videos page put prime on search line and you get it.

    bon appetit!
     
  10. shel

    shel Banned

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    Maybe I'm putting too fine a point on this, but in order to make a true prime rib one needs to use prime grade meat. Using choice, while giving good results. is not making a prime rib. It's just a standing rib roast. That's the way I learned it from some great butchers, and the way it was expained on a recent show about preparing prime rib.

    If I ever ordered prime rib in a restaurant and got a roast made with choice meat, I'd be very upset.

    shel
     
  11. just jim

    just jim

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    These days in most restaurants you'd be lucky not to get select.
     
  12. shel

    shel Banned

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    What a shame, if that's really the case. So, how does a restaurant A) justify selling such a cheap cut of meat as "prime" rib, B) feel they can honestly call it prime, and C) get it to taste like prime?

    Personally, I feel that selling a lesser cut and calling it prime is just outright dishonest. Like selling farmed salmon and calling it "wild"

    Frankly, I'm getting sick and tired of restaurants and markets lying to the public.

    shel
     
  13. just jim

    just jim

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    I think it's mostly due to an uneducated public.
    They see a slice of standing rib roast, and they think prime rib.
    Whatthey will look for is flavor and tenderness.
    And we know that's a crapshoot with select, to say the least.
     
  14. andyg

    andyg

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    If you can't tell whether that's the case or not, why does it upset you? If it tastes good, it is good :D
     
  15. shel

    shel Banned

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    Because people are being cheated and lied to. As for me, if I want prime rib, which isn't too often, I go to a restaurant that I know sells prime rib. And I can tell the difference between prime and select - and it ain't just taste0.
    .
    Are you willing to settle for lower quality and grades of meat, and pay for a higher quality grade? I'm not.

    shel
     
  16. just jim

    just jim

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    More on the uneducated public.
    Visiting my in-laws in Colorado, they took us to a restaurant that had a French Dip special.
    Being in beef country, I thought I had to try it.
    What I got was a thick cut of roast beef on a hamburger bun with brown gravy for "dunking".
    And it was selling like hotcakes, and every other customer had smiles on their faces when they received it.

    By the way, how did we measure food sales before hotcakes were invented?
     
  17. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Indeed the word "prime" when associated with a beef rib roast is confusing.

    Most, not all diners when ordering a prime rib are ordering a specific cut, as opposed to a grade (109/107/110 etc) I agree that the word "prime" should not be associated with this cut of beef. I wrote my initial reply in 2001 (7 years ago)
     
  18. andyg

    andyg

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    Your original post said if Select is what you have been getting, you'd be upset or whatever. That's why I though, hmm if you didn't notice . . . . why be upset.
     
  19. shel

    shel Banned

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    You either misread my post, misunderstood it, or read something from someone else. I've been strongly against using anything but prime for prime rib throughout this thread.

    shel
     
  20. oldschool1982

    oldschool1982

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    Under current USDA guidlines there is no restriction on the use of the word "Prime" when refering to any form of rib roast regardless of actual grade.
    This is taken from page 136 of the USDA's 2003 Food Standards and Labeling Policy Book. There is nothing shady nor disreputable in marketing any type of rib roast as prime when it is not from "prime grade". Especially since only 2% of all beef actually gets this stamp.

    I'm not sure when the standing rib roast was named "Prime Rib"... Yet since the grading of beef on a regular basis only dates back to the 1940's and then prior to that it was a very irregular and voluntary process dating back only to 1916... What was the standard prior to that?

    I firmly believe when it was refered to as Prime Rib it was to appeal to a small portion of the population. Or maybe it was reserved for the Royalty of England. What ever the case, Prime designated (as it still does today) a more refined and more expensive cut of meat. Because of this your average person could not afford such a cut of meat.

    As I've always understood the whole process of slow roasting Prime Rib, Standing Rib roast or what ever the heck you wish to call it is....To create an expedited aging process. In effect you are allowing a rather large hunk of meat to sit for several hours at a temperature that would cause most other foods to spoil. Basically by doing this at the lower temperature you accelerate the natural enzymes in the meat itself to help break down the meats protein structure and produce a more tender and flavorful cut of meat.

    As far as the ability to differenciate between the two????? I'd wager that there are probably more than a couple of us Professional Chefs on this board that could take a Select or Choice cut, age it past the typical 21 days that most beef is served from, season it and then roast it with learned techniques that even those with an above average or more developed palette than most couldn't tell the difference between it or Prime.

    It's kind of like the term "Ribeye". Actually a Ribeye steak has no tail. A Delmonico cut has the tail. It's just become acceptable that all steaks cut from the Rib section of the steer are Ribeye's.