i need help with my sugar

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by cake girl, Sep 8, 2005.

  1. cake girl

    cake girl

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    :confused: hi i am new here and i am hoping that some one can help me i am trying to make sugar nests by melting the sugar and swirling it around with a wisk and shaping it into a nest but i have no idea how to do this someone help please thanks :)
     
  2. sucrechef

    sucrechef

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    First, instead of a whisk (unless you cut off the ends to make tines) try using a metal fork. There are a few ways you can do this... you can use a bowl or a ramekin (ceramic) and spray well with pan spray. This is essential if you want to be able to remove the sugar nest. You can use either the inside or the outside, but whichever side must be smooth. When you've cooked the sugar to hard crack, remove from the heat and add any food coloring you want (carefully...it will boil up). The sugar will need to cool slightly before it will form strands instead of drops. At this point you can start making your spun sugar nests. Practice makes perfect!
     
  3. zukerig

    zukerig

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    A few extra notes as an addendum to the first-rate instruction offered by Sucrechef, above….

    You must indeed cook granulated sugar to the brittle, hard-crack stage (295°-300°F) and then caramelize it by continuing to cook the syrup several minutes until it turns a medium amber. To determine exactly what stage the sryup is at, spoon out a bit and drop it in a glass of cold water, then take it out once it has cooled; at the soft-ball stage (235°) the ball will flatten slightly under its own weight; whereas at the hard-ball stage it will hold its shape, but will yield a bit when squeezed; at the hard-crack stage it will not form a ball at all, but a long brittle thread.

    When the syrup has cooled sufficiently to from threads when dribbled from a metal spoon, you must be alert & ready to cross threads of the syrup over the outside of a chilled-&-lightly-oiled, inverted stainless-steel bowl. (I like to use almond oil to coat the bowl). For individual-serving sizes, you’ll need to use no more than 1-2 teaspoons at at time.

    When the cage has completely cooled, carefully twist it to twist it off the bowl. The cages should be made no more than 24 hours prior to serving. (4 hours at room temperature is really optimum holding time.) Store them in a cool dry area – but not under refrigeration which will cause the sugar to melt!

    1 cup granulated sugar; 1/3 cup purified water; 2 tbsps light corn syrup; pinch of cream of tartar.

    In my Cordon Bleu training, the cages were given a classic presentation: crowning splendid bowls of oeufs à la niege. Of course, you can also use them to top custards or as nest in which to hold scoops of frozen confections. A very fine inclusion on an Autumn dessert menu: Poached Apples w/ Cider Sorbet, crowned w/ Caramel Domes. In the Winter, it’s lovely to serve them with elegant whole Caramelized Oranges & Zabaglione. Or even Poached Pears!
     
  4. cake girl

    cake girl

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    Thank you both so much for your advice it is greatly apreciated i will try it and see how it comes out !!!thanks again ;)
     
  5. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    Adding to Sucrechef and Zukerig first class instructions there. You can use the back of a metal dipping ladle. Just grease it lightly so your nests will be easier to remove. Other than that the other two chefs got you covered.
     
  6. cake girl

    cake girl

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    good idea thanks cakerookie ;)