I need a good pork fillet recipe

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by somethingtasty, Jul 2, 2011.

  1. somethingtasty

    somethingtasty

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    Hi all,

    For some time now I have had the craving to try cooking pork fillet. However, I have a hard time finding a recipe that would suit me.. I don't have a special preference for it, so I will accept whatever is the favourite for you. Please post your favourite pork fillet recipes, or at least various ways of preparing pork fillet.

    Thanks.
     
  2. somethingtasty

    somethingtasty

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    http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Ginger-Marinated-Pork-Tenderloin-108734

    I found this and it looks really good.. However, I need some help with the last part.

    "While meat is roasting, pour marinade through a fine-mesh sieve into a small saucepan and boil until reduced to about 1/3 cup, 10 to 15 minutes. Stir in remaining cup broth and bring sauce to a simmer."

    Can somebody help me with this? It says to put the marinade and let it boil until reduced to 1/3 cup, however around high heat should I put so that it doesn't burn but if effectively reduces? I haven't done this (not much experience with sauces) before, and I am afraid I might burn it, do you recommend medium, medium-low or low temperature for this? Also, I guess the ending means when I add the broth, I bring it to a simmer and remove it right away?
     
  3. cookers

    cookers

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    Here's how I would make it. Evenly coat it with salt, pepper, and garlic. Cook it to the temp you like. Then top it off with this sauce. 

    Reduce apple juice in a pan, halfway through, add mandarian oranges, cloves (not too many), nutmeg, a dash of cumin, and a little bit of ginger. 

    When reducing, you can use high heat. Just put it on low heat once it starts to boil torwards the end when you have half of what you started from in the pan. 
     
  4. somethingtasty

    somethingtasty

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    "and boil until reduced to about 1/3 cup"

    Judging by this it should boil all the way, which doesn't make a lot of sense. Any explanation?

    Also, could you give me a sort of a recipe on your way of making it, because it looks quite good but without measures, temperatures and times I will get lost.. :) thanks
     
  5. somethingtasty

    somethingtasty

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    What I meant was my recipe was unclear about that, "boil until" means to boil it all the way (at least IMO) and you say to let it reach a boil at the end.. Anyway, could I put it on a medium-high heat until boiling and then low heat until reduced? And, another stupid question, what about stirring? I wouldn't be so stubborn about this part but I really have no experience with this and it's the marinade I'm cooking, I musn't let it burn. Thanks
     
  6. chefedb

    chefedb

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    It seems they are sking for a reduction to improve overall flavor. Unless marinade is loaded with sugars it should not burn. Cook on med. burner but watch it. Why they tell you to do it in 2 steps by then adding remaining  broth is beyond me.. You only thin it out again. Maybe they do not want an intense flavor. Who knows , it's their concoction.
     
  7. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Sometimes, Ed, a double reduction actually intensifies all the flavors, rather than softening them. F'rinstance, Eric Ripart's Black Bass with Port Wine ues a sauce that includes both Port and Sherry vinegar. First the Pork is reduced, then the vinegar added, and the whole thing reduced again. 

    Out of curiousity I've made it both ways (that is, the double reduction and combining the Port and vinegar and reducing just once), and there really is a flavor difference.

    Don't know if that's what's involved with the pork dish. But it's a possibility.

    Maybe I ought to take a look at the recipe? /img/vbsmilies/smilies/confused.gif
     
  8. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    OK, I looked at the recipe. Seems to me you're supposed to wind up with a broth-like sauce that's been flavored by the reduced marinade. Pretty much the modern direction that sauces have taken, so it shouldn't be much of a surprise.

    Something Tasty: You shouldn't have much trouble with this. I would work at medium-high, monitoring the marinade as it reduces. It will turn syrupy, which is normal. After you add the broth back in the idea is to reheat it, which is why it says to bring it to a simmer (not the same as boiling).
     
  9. somethingtasty

    somethingtasty

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  10. somethingtasty

    somethingtasty

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    Sorry about the above post, didn't see your new reply.

    So, I put it at medium-high, let it boil but of course watch it and logically no stirring, right? I have to double ask because it's really something I don't have experience with, when it comes to sweet stuff I feel like I have a bigger understanding but the savoury isn't something I do a lot.

    Also, I add the remaining broth, and when it starts simmering remove it (so it's liquidy and not as thick) or reduce it again? Because it doesn't mention reducing.

    And another question, the recipe says to roast the meat in the pan you've fried it in. Since I'm going to use my teflon frying pan for this, I guess it's better to replace with another pan? If so, do I put oil? Don't laugh please :)
     
  11. somethingtasty

    somethingtasty

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    The marinade has 1/4 cup (50 grams) brown sugar, hopefully that won't be a problem..
     
  12. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    Remember, as long as there is liquid, the temperature can go no higher than the boiling point of the liquid, and that is generally lower than the temperature at which something "burns".

    You DO have to keep an eye on it, if it reduces too far, it WILL burn.

    You are starting with 1 2/3 cup of chicken broth/stock, that's nearly the same as water, in terms of boiling point, i,e, 212° F.
     
  13. somethingtasty

    somethingtasty

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    Okay thanks a lot. The reducing thing is pretty much covered, unless someone has extra tips and advices.

    Now for roasting the meat (I can see you cooking this meal for me to shut me up). The recipe says 12-15 minutes at 425 F (220 C). Seeing as I have already browned it before and the meat is roasted uncovered, do you think this is a good temperature, that won't sacrifice the tenderness and moistness of the meat?

    Also, I do not have an instant-read thermometer, so what's your advice on knowing when it is done?
     
  14. somethingtasty

    somethingtasty

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    And one more question (please take a look at the ones above this post as well), I was reading some comments at the recipe's site about being able to keep the pork in the marinade for some days in the refrigerator, but nothing official. About how much time would pork keep refrigerated in this marinade? Knowing that raw meat isn't very friendly with the fridge, I hope that the marinade will help this process. Thanks