I am getting a high paying job in a different industry. Should i quit my career as a chef?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by chef brah, Dec 20, 2016.

  1. chef brah

    chef brah

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    I am not seeing any money come in anytime soon as a chef but i am still enjoying learning.

    I am 27.

    i used to work in tech and but i have been cooking for 5 years as a strong hobby. recently i started interning at a michelin star restaurant but i m not really earning and surviving on my savings from my career as a digital consultant. 

    now i am getting similar job but with an ecommerce startup and its too tempting in terms of salary (roughly $5.5k a month).

    and its based in nyc.

    at best i will be able to host supperclubs and stage at restaurant on weekends selectively.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2016
  2. luis de vence

    luis de vence

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    Is cooking your passion? Do you have a family? Will you be happy going back to being a tech? 5.5k a month, i'd be tempted too.
     
  3. someday

    someday

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    Yes you should quit. 
     
  4. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    Pretty hard to tell you to stick it out.  You're young with many years of working ahead of you.  Assuming you don't mind IT and are good at it you'd probably be a lot better off going back to it.  I love the kitchen but I'm 20 years older than (and I don't have any desire to do IT/InfoSec), seems like a no-brainer to me.  You can still stage or moonlight if you want.
     
  5. chef brah

    chef brah

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    yes i was thinking i can do staging on weekends and host supperclubs (private dinners) at a venue.

    cooking is just an aspect of life i cannot give up and having an audience to give feedback does encourage me a lot
     
  6. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Congrats on the offer.

    Be sure to take advantage of whatever retirement savings benefits this new place offers.

    Esp if they offer to match whatever you contribute (usual is 100% match to a certain amt pretax).

    The "wealth management company" they use may sux but if you familiarize yourself with the laws you can start moving it out and reinvesting after a certain amt of time (I THINK...the laws are always changing so a conversation with a tax attny would be beneficial).

    Then someday you can retire to a tropical island and open a stand on the beach.

    Maybe one that sells strong rum drinks served in carved coconuts.

    /img/vbsmilies/smilies/cool.gif

    mimi
     
  7. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    I love surfing the internet. Should I consider changing to a job in IT?

    Many a hobby has been ruined by people turning a hobby into a full time pursuit.

    Cooking is just one aspect of being a chef. I can pursue my love of cooking without having to get a paycheck, but I also love being a chef. Same thing, only not. Cooking has many different avenues. Cooking dinner parties for 10 people is different than cooking in a restaurant turning out 300 plates a service.

    A friend of mine retired 6 months ago. He could hardly wait, now he could play golf everyday. Recently he returned to work part time because he can only play golf just so many times a week. :~)

    To answer your original question, from what I have read of your posts so far, yes.

    In considering career moves, what is the application layer of your OSI model? Is it cooking or is it paycheck?
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2016
    flipflopgirl likes this.
  8. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    I love to shop altho could never make a go of it as a career.

    Unless all of my clients were my size and loved boho gypsy skirts paired with gauzy tops and tons of bracelets.

    Cowgirl boots with 16 inch shafts and colorful tooling.

    And crazy curly hair that I never brush.

    Plus I am told I smell like I bathe in patchouli oil.

    Works for me tho lol.

    /img/vbsmilies/smilies/cool.gif

    mimi

    Forgot the flipflops.

    Last count I have 14 pairs.

    m.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2016
  9. peachcreek

    peachcreek

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    I say go do what you love. :D That applies to all of you!

    Peachcreek
     
  10. chef brah

    chef brah

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    Haha..i definitely plan to do that...but also hoped to have my own restaurant by age of 40..lets see..maybe i can buy my own restaurant from money earned in Tech career.
    well IT (now called Tech ), does pay decent money and jobs come with lots of benefits.

    i do want to remain seriously into cooking though...i think working as a chef in a restaurant has improved me as a person little bit... more humble, more patient, more organised and more focussed in whatever i do.
     
  11. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Congratulations on that. I am still waiting on my turn at that. :~)
     
  12. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    66K a year in NYC is a living wage. The only reason why most Chefs stay in this business is because of their passion. The only way to make any money in this business is to have your own. If your working for someone else you will never make the amount of money you deserve. Most chefs stay in this business because it gives a person a high amount of self satisfaction. Put self satisfaction together with passion you will have the recipe for happiness. When I look back at my career I never took a position because of the money. I always took the position because it allowed me to accomplish my goals, practice my skills and grow as a chef. Money is great, but, working in a career that allows you to achieve all the things I listed is worth its weight in gold..........
     
  13. panini

    panini

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    @Chef Brah,

        I'm not capable of giving advice on your question because I don't have a true understanding of your situation.

    I can mention a few things I've picked up along the way in the food industry in the last 45 yrs.

    DISCLAIMER: just my opinions:

    The sooner you disassociate the word passion from your food industry vocabulary the better of you'll be.

    It infuriates me to hear PASSION as a blanket excuse, perpetrated in the past I assume by the higher up’s, to accept the persecution of the people responsible for generating income. It’s part of the reason this has stagnated our industry immensely i.e.. compensation, verbal abuse, hourly abuse, gender abuse, ethnic abuse, etc.

      It’s inconceivable how one of the largest industries in the world could remain so primitive.

      Most anyone who enjoys what they do to generate income is passionate. Mail Carriers, Landscapers, Surgeons, Social Workers, Teachers, etc.

       I understand these professions may require extra efforts but are usually within a respectful environment with some type of compensation. Basically, it’s usually not a given that employees expect and accept this type of treatment.

      Compensation for doing something you’re passionate about can be financial or emotional.

      My biggest life lesson came 30 yrs. ago when I heard the phrase.

     NEVER LIVE TO WORK, ALWAYS WORK TO LIVE.

       I’m passionate about what I do to support my family. I’ve also adjusted it so my compensation allows me to live outside that environment.

      My outside passions, volunteering, mentoring, metal working, are far more rewarding emotionally.
     
  14. chef brah

    chef brah

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    the itch of business remains in my family and i did have a small online business in college. i think i am too nice sometimes to run my business but i am understanding workings of corporate better through my white collar consultant jobs. i do plan to use my business major degree and experience in cooking to start my own business when i feel confident in my ability to manage people better because in the end..managing people is the biggest struggle in most jobs atleast for some of us misfits who dare to work as a chef.
    you are right...and lot of my senior managers preach you are your job and you are your work after all but i am one of those ADD people who has atleast 2-3 hobbies going on at one time...and they do reward me emotionally...and they do help in my job as a consultant as i understand lot of industries now.

    AND i have to also say..its nice being on a forum with such experienced people because most forums and social media is filled with bad advice
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2016
  15. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    Chef Brah, IMHO, there are a few keys to owning a successful business. When your first thinking about being in business someday, start evaluating your strengths and weaknesses. If your doing ok in the food/cooking area, but, have a hard time managing then work on that. Be honest with yourself because not being good in managing people will come back to bit you someday. When I started my business the first thing I did was hire a bookkeeper to keep everything in line and keep my taxes and payroll in line. I also had an on-site bookkeeper that controlled the money and daily deposits and banking. I realized what my strength was cooking, customer service and managing my employees. In other words I was good at working the kitchen along with my employees and dealing one on one with my clients and customers. I also found out early that my clients didn't necessarily want my company to take care of their needs, they wanted me to take care of things. My advice to you is, if your able to, try to work as many different food services as you can. I worked in over 25 different food services from fast food, catering, fine dining, concession and many other kinds of restaurants. If you look out the same window everyday you will only have one view. When you are successful in your business there will be many "pats on the back" acknowledging your success. The best "pat on the back" will come when you walk out at night and pat yourself on the back. This will tell you that you are achieving your goals, managing a successful operation and fulfilling your dreams......ChefBillyB
     
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  16. peachcreek

    peachcreek

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    @Chef Brah something else to consider is that as a young person starting out your competition are people who might not have a back up occupation to go to. Those young chefs may have a huge loan they need to start paying back from a culinary school. This position could mean a life changing piece on their resume for them. The bottom line is that others made a big commitment to go into culinary are banking on these entry level chef jobs and they will fight for those jobs like it means life or death. Good luck whatever you do!

    Peachcreek
     
  17. thewolff

    thewolff

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    I don't posts or respond to post very frequently but your last post definitely spoke to me.

    This last bit that you said is true for many, but there is a few people out there that only receive happiness from their job. Call it ambition, ego, whatever. Many of the jobs you listed; teacher, postal worker are the epitome of work to live. I have no problem with this. My wife is a teacher. She loves children and loves working with them, but she would never have been a teacher unless the benefits were good enough (pension, time off).

    I on the other hand do not find too much pleasure in life outside of work. I am a highly competitive person and want to always be the best. I live to work and love it. My wife knows I am happy and so is she.

    @chefbrah

    I think you need to look at yourself and try to figure out what makes you happy. Is it money? Having free time to pursue your hobbies? Success in the work place? Family?

    Also 66k in NYC is on the low end. My combined income with my wife is over 200k and we still can not afford buying anything that isn't in a shit neighborhood.
     
  18. chef brah

    chef brah

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    Yes you are right i need to figure out what makes me happy.

    i have realized after a certain amount of money to spend, what really makes me happy is the work and recognition and continuously learning something new.
     
  19. chef brah

    chef brah

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    hi guys

    so i have thought long and hard....these office jobs just help me improve my financial savings...theres no other place i feel more belonged than in a kitchen.

    i am thinking of saving this year and dive completely into chef career...going to enroll into culinary school (father is willing to pay half of the cost) and then continue onto the journey

    i will be honest..i come from well to do family and my only fear was extremely lowering my lifestyle...but i did that and i didnt mind it.

    meanwhile i m hosting supperclubs on weekends and making my name known among friends and circle..