Hydrogen peroxide for shelf life extension

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Joined Dec 7, 2009
Shelf life is a very important topic. I use alot of half and half now and want to buy in bigger bulk to save on expense but could run into a shelf life situation. A search of the terms led me to a site from diary group saying something to the rough effect that .005-.009% of HO (hydrogen peroxide) added to cream would 2x shelf life.

Subtitle: Does bacteria equal flavor?

I would not be surprised. Whats is to lose here, don't be scared, you could drink an oz of hydrogen peroxide w/o ill effects I would guess (consult physician before attempting).

Would you, could you? Would you do it in a restaurant? Is it safe, should it be secret?

"Gee honey, I wish you would not have told the Brimmenmens I added Hydrogen Peroxide to the cream in the dinner and how you love having a scientist for a hubby." I don't think they want to have dinner here again. We are getting transfered to Nutley, N.J. next year where I will be working part time as a shipping clerk."

I just threw away some 10 day old tomatoe paste @ .69 and I would have loved to extend its life if I could. I know you are thinking I will be marinating my ribeye in Muriatic Acid before you know it.

I live on the edge.
 
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Joined Sep 29, 2009
I don't see how this could have much of an effect. Hydrogen Peroxide degrades into Water pretty quickly, as I understand. The sealed shelf life may be extended but, the minute it's opened again, more bacteria are introduced to a now non sterile environment, nullifying the effects. I may be wrong though.
 
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Joined Dec 7, 2009
Look up the univ of cal studies, very simple search, I found it in a couple places.

Fascinating, although I am fairly low in the caste system I am a member of the Mensa group and I think this better diet is helping both my energy, my spirit and my mind.

My mind would always buzz with ideas but since I am now getting alot of good stuff I never ate before I think my energies are just off the hook.

I find these studies with their references to gram postive this and that and chi-squared terminology, long rods etc. to be just very very interesting. Now to apply this to save my little humble family good money would be just heaven for me.

I used to build HPLC equipment for a man know as the father of HPLC Dr. Emmet Durrum and he always said organic chemistry was fas-in-ate-ing. No time to spell right.

The mixing of flavors is a simple example of the action of chemistry and a little luck right.

Find and read the article.

In my window cleaning group have an award for the post of the month. Could we do that here. I want to nominate myself.:laser:
 
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Joined Sep 29, 2009
Chemistry, yes - luck, not so much. There is a skill involved, outside of the understanding of the chemistry involved. There also needs to be an understanding of the sensation of taste, which is more than flavor(the chemical component, if you want to break it down to that level). Taste involves a full sensory cooperation. It begins with something looking appetizing, it then has to be pleasing to the nose. The tactile nerves of the mouth must also be pleased. Finally, there's the taste buds on the tongue.

For example:
If you loved chocolate cake with almond buttercream icing more than anything in the world, and I gave you a bowl of that very cake from your favorite bakery but ran it through a blender until it was completely liquified, you would most probably be disinclined to eat it. The chemistry(flavor) is still the same but, having been liquified, the texture(tactile sensation) of the difference between the moist, firm cake and the buttery, creamy icing would be gone. The aroma(mostly smell) would have also changed, as the cocoa butter in the chocolate would now dominate. It would also look like a bowl of brown snot which would make some people feel physically ill by itself.
 
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Joined Mar 21, 2008
Tomato paste in a tube is the cure there. Keeps well over a month once opened. I can't buy locally but Amazon carries it. More expensive than the little can but in the long run it is a money saver. Another option is put the left over tomato paste in a small ziplock and flatten it out. Seal the bag then freeze. You can break off what you need and toss the rest back in the freezer.
 
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Joined Jan 14, 2007
I get half and half from Sysco ultra-pasteurized with a date usually six weeks out. I usually get 3 cases, 36 quarts at a time. How many cases do you need to buy to get a better price??

I often have canned tomato paste and chipotle peppers leftover, I just put them in a zip-lock, flatten it, freeze, and theh break off smaller pieces as I use them. Tomato paste also come in squeeze tube?

Nan
 
843
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Joined Oct 16, 2008
While it may sound like a good idea, I recall a few years ago a local fish Monger was dipping his fish in a peroxide/water solution to extend the shelf life and the health department got wind of it and shut him down. Just becareful and be sure that your local health regs dont prohibit the addition of shelf life extenders in product.
 
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Joined Apr 3, 2008
tomato paste in a tube, garlic puree in a tube and mayo from a tube. All things, my wife assures me, the Euro's are much more hip on then us Yanks. my vote is the 'ol bag and freeze.
 
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Joined Jan 27, 2010
Shelf life of commercially processed poultry and seafood can be extended by introducing food grade H[sub]2[/sub] O[sub]2[/sub] and food grade surface active agents into the chiller water to wash off bacteria on the surface of the food product. The agents are alkylaryl sulfonates, sulfates, sulfonates of oils and fatty acid, sulfate of alcohols and sulfosuccinates.
 
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Joined Aug 13, 2006
I once stupidly bought fish from a supermarket on new year's eve.  That's one of the days that people here like to have big fish dinners, after christmas eve when they have anohter.  No doubt the supermarket wanted to "extend the shelf life" of the fish.  Got it home and started cooking it.  It seemed to lack the usual texture, firmness, of fresh fish.  I had only cooked two pieces, and tasted one.  Something weird there.  Smelled the ones i hadn't cooked - bleach!!  Extend the shelf life my *&#%#!!!
Please don't add crap to you food.  Fresh food is good.  "Extended" food is not good.  Also peroxide does have a taste - if you can't taste it, you shouldn't be cooking because you can't trust your taste buds!
 
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Joined Apr 2, 2007
Siduri is right, do not add chemicals to your food. I had the same problem with a cheap chicken from a supermarket, it smelled of sanitiser and tasted awful. Its not worth the saving and you don't know the effect it is having on your body.
 

pete

Moderator
Staff member
4,478
981
Joined Oct 7, 2001
Do you really want to buy bigger just to save a few pennies?  Why would you want to knowingly add more chemicals to your food, don't we ingest more chemicals than we really need to?  Besides, just because the usable life has been extended doesn't mean it will still taste as good.  Whipping cream is a great example.  Most of what you get now is ultra pasteurized meaning it seems to last for weeks and weeks, but taste it.  First off it tastes like crap, compared to the non ultra pasteurized stuff, but taste it when you first open it.  Leave it in the fridge for a few weeks and taste it again.  Even though it may still not be close to its expiration date its flavor as definately deteriorated.
 
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Joined Jan 27, 2010
Hydrogen peroxide causes mutations (genetic changes) and may have a cancer risk..
It is not used as preservative and it is a shame that many people get it now through toothpaste.
The small size and the similarity with water makes H2O2 easy to reach the inside of the cell, the oxidation through peroxides is chain reaction and the peroxide can reach any cell coumpound, creating changes on proteins and ADN, and fats too.
Don't use peroxide at all.
Sorry to be explicit, you will poison your guests
 
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Joined Nov 1, 2009
"Excuse me, waiter? I didn't want the fries that's why  I ordered the Pomme Frites ."

That's funny./img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif
 
163
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Joined Nov 1, 2009
I once stupidly bought fish from a supermarket on new year's eve.  That's one of the days that people here like to have big fish dinners, after christmas eve when they have anohter.  No doubt the supermarket wanted to "extend the shelf life" of the fish.  Got it home and started cooking it.  It seemed to lack the usual texture, firmness, of fresh fish.  I had only cooked two pieces, and tasted one.  Something weird there.  Smelled the ones i hadn't cooked - bleach!!  Extend the shelf life my *&#%#!!!
Please don't add crap to you food.  Fresh food is good.  "Extended" food is not good.  Also peroxide does have a taste - if you can't taste it, you shouldn't be cooking because you can't trust your taste buds!
 
Yeah, I have to go with siduri as well. 
 
618
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Joined Jul 18, 2000
Bizarre, Diversey Suma has an active ingredient of Phosphoric Acid and Lactic Acid.  Personally I hate the stuff, but when in Rome,.

With regards to Fish/Seafoods, a simple rinse of soda water and salt will do wonders. Bleaching, no. Afaik, anything potentially toxic that touches food, i.e bleach is not a good scenario. If it was safe, then why wouldnt it be a common food additive. Hmm, maybe your scientific mind could lend itself to discovering the reason/ effect why it is so effective and possibly find a less toxic alternative.

If it is matter of extending shelf life, it could possilby be a matter of matching your purchasing to your needs.  It is nice to have a lot of gear around, but if your constantly binning stuff, whats the point of having it.  Some things you can extend the lifespan, others you cannot.
 
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Joined Feb 4, 2010
As a culinary scientist, I never heard of using hydrogen peroxide in foods. I wouldn't. The stuff sold in drug store is NOT food grade. There are many other ways of storing foods to extend shelf life. E.g., tomato paste you mentioned stores very well in the freezer in a plastic wrap. It doesn't freeze solid so it's easy to cut off a small amount when needed. Check out my book below for many other storage ideas.
 
423
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Joined Jan 27, 2010
yeah there many way of storing food , im not really vote the hydrogen peroxide, because not common use as a food preservative . It is a sort of medicine that can be buy in drug store for me . I don't with others.
 
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Joined Aug 22, 2017
Hydrogen peroxide causes mutations (genetic changes) and may have a cancer risk..
It is not used as preservative and it is a shame that many people get it now through toothpaste.
The small size and the similarity with water makes H2O2 easy to reach the inside of the cell, the oxidation through peroxides is chain reaction and the peroxide can reach any cell coumpound, creating changes on proteins and ADN, and fats too.
Don't use peroxide at all.
Sorry to be explicit, you will poison your guests
Wow. That was pure wrong. H2O2 does NOT cause genetic mutations: the exact opposite is true. Science, especially genetic mutations, are best left to scientists not chefs.
 

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