Hydro dipping kitchen equipment!

62
7
Joined May 1, 2019
Would you guys think it would be safe to hydro dip equipment to change the design ?? Ex. Mandoline, peeker things like that
 
624
230
Joined May 25, 2015
No idea what you are talking about.

After some Googling it looks like some kind method for decorating an object with toxic chemicals and an image transfer with the image transferring off of a film onto the surface of a tub of water into which you dip the object.

I would say with certainty that it's not something I would do to something that comes in contact with food.
 
Last edited:
5,329
799
Joined Oct 10, 2005
I dunno, I just dunno....

“Design” is a process where for me follows function. To change a design—intelligently— means studying human movement that interacts with the item, studying new materials or production processes, and applying this study to the existing design.

Is this what you are talking about? Or are you saying to throw a piece of equipment into a tank, take the resulting mess out, and sell it as “ New and improved””?
 
62
7
Joined May 1, 2019
I would not say new and improved just more aesthetically appealing to modern consumers but it would be for myself not to market or anything of that sort. Thank you for the feed back
 
624
230
Joined May 25, 2015
If reputable manufacturers decided to do something like that it would be with non-toxic and FDA approved methods. This is a big problem with Chinese goods.

I would not say new and improved just more aesthetically appealing to modern consumers
I think you may be on to something with "modern consumers" though. Since most don't know anything about cooking, the equipment you propose would hang on the wall or sit on a shelf as an object de art.
 
62
7
Joined May 1, 2019
That and millenials and gen z are more susceptible to being interested in things that have more "texture" or "pop" you now watta i mean? Like the evolution with aprons, coats, pants and shoes.
 
624
230
Joined May 25, 2015
Uniforms and staff attire are chosen by the management to promote a certain image to the customers for the business.

Equipment for food prep is chosen for functionality and production, not for some minimum wage worker to stand there and look at and think is cool.
 
4,577
802
Joined Aug 21, 2004
millenials and gen z are more susceptible to being interested in things that have more "texture" or "pop" you now watta i mean?
I was attracted to food a a profession by the"texture" or "pop" of the finished product being sent out front to guests, not by the "texture" or "pop" of the tools. Because food was the pull, I feel it was a good choice for me. If the pull was more about the tools, I don't know!!! Know what I mean?
 
62
7
Joined May 1, 2019
I was attracted to food a a profession by the"texture" or "pop" of the finished product being sent out front to guests, not by the "texture" or "pop" of the tools. Because food was the pull, I feel it was a good choice for me. If the pull was more about the tools, I don't know!!! Know what I mean?
But how old are though? I love my job to, passionate but would that stop me from having nice tools??
 
62
7
Joined May 1, 2019
I was attracted to food a a profession by the"texture" or "pop" of the finished product being sent out front to guests, not by the "texture" or "pop" of the tools. Because food was the pull, I feel it was a good choice for me. If the pull was more about the tools, I don't know!!! Know what I mean?
so whats the problem with it looking "cool" i hate that word so much "COOOOOOOL" what is wrong with owning nice things ?
 
624
230
Joined May 25, 2015
Because "nice" is a relative term. It's a matter of perception. What you perceive to be "nice" reflects your level of thinking.

For instance, an experienced Chef might walk into a new kitchen and the first thing he is going to notice is things like the type and quality of equipment, the layout and cleanliness. High marks in those areas would make him remark "wow, nice"!

A candidate for a dishwasher might look into the kitchen and if he sees one of your psychedelic mandolines might cause him to say "wow, nice!

What's the difference between the thinking of the two? The professional knows that form follows function and functionality is what he is going to need to make a profit.
 
5,329
799
Joined Oct 10, 2005
Look, design is all about change to accommodate new materials, new processes, new tools, rules or laws, or new techniques.

But to change a tool or a piece of equipment only cosmetically is just art—it has nothing to do with design or functionality. Basically , changing only the appearance of a tool is about as useful as a tattoo— it’s only purpose is to attract attention, which is the opposite of a well designed tool, in that a really good tool is useful and ergonomic. Art is just that, art.
 
624
230
Joined May 25, 2015
This whole idea reminds me of when kids put stickers all over their cell phones or computers.
 
3
10
Joined Apr 27, 2015
How about a compromise? Hydro-dip cool looking warning labels and safety rules on equipment?

But seriously, wouldn't making a piece of kitchen equipment more colorful and artistic, make it that much harder to tell if it's clean and sanitized?
 
4,577
802
Joined Aug 21, 2004
But seriously, wouldn't making a piece of kitchen equipment more colorful and artistic, make it that much harder to tell if it's clean and sanitized?
Don't know, I do know that being more colorful and artistic isn't going to make me want to use it more than when it was drab.
so whats the problem with it looking "cool" i hate that word so much "COOOOOOOL" what is wrong with owning nice things ?
There is nothing wrong with owning nice things but the ego pump of adding artistic and more colorful touches will wear off shortly and you won't even notice the added touches anymore. In the meantime, your ego will be off and running looking for the next pump. During which time, appreciation for the innate beauty of the tool as a nice thing, gets lost in the shuffle . On to the next latest and greatest thing!
 
62
7
Joined May 1, 2019
Why would cleanliness and sanitization be a problem maybe if the colors used were dark? I take my equipment apart and thoroughly wash each piece, soap, water, and sanitizer then rinse again. I dont understand how having an appreciation for art makes me an ego pump or whatever?
 
624
230
Joined May 25, 2015
Equipment used in food prep for the public is usually NSF certified. Any modification to that equipment, such as you are talking about will void that certification. The health department will make you stop using it. Being contaminated with paint is no different than being dirty.

I dont understand how having an appreciation for art makes me an ego pump or whatever?
If you can find an equipment manufacturer who would be receptive of your idea I say go for it. Otherwise I suggest that you direct your artistic energy in some other direction because anybody in this industry is going to think what you suggest is silly.
 
5,329
799
Joined Oct 10, 2005
Most of us who work with and depend on our tools to feed our family/ pay rent, etc., draw a pretty clear line in the sand between art, and usefulness and dependability. Whatever you want to do at home is your business, but at the workplace art on tools takes a backseat to saleable out-put which, ironically, needs some artistic flair. In other words we focus on the end product, not the tools.

Mystickrewe, the only way to differentiate between a sanitized tool and a non sanitized one is to press said tool into a Petri dish and wait 48 hrs to see if anything grows in that dish. It’s easy to see if a tool is free from any visible debris, heck, you can spit-polish it if you like, but it’s not easy to see if it’s sanitized. That said, if the tool has multiple colours and uneven/ decorated surfaces, it can be pretty hard to ascertain if that tool is free of visible debris.
 

Latest posts

Top Bottom