How to Salvage This Low Fat Boneless Pork Loin?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by chelle, Jun 6, 2014.

  1. chelle

    chelle

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    My significant other accidentally bought a boneless pork loin today with too little fat content.  He intended to get 7g fat/4oz, but accidentally bought 3.5g fat/4 oz.   He knows how to cook (I don’t), but is stumped on how to make this pork loin without it turning out dry as a bone.  He intends to make it in the crock pot.  He said even the pork loin with 7g fat is “marginally dry” in the crock pot, so he thinks the 3.5oz fat will be an inedible disaster.  Anyone have any advice for him?  It might be relevant to know that he’s trying to lose weight; he intended this to be a healthful sort of deal.  Thanks in advance for any suggestions!  
     
  2. chelle

    chelle

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    Not sure if this is relevant, but he bought 9.75 lbs of the stuff!  
     
  3. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    It is not a cut suited to the crock pot. It's good on the grill, makes a good bacon wrapped tornedo, stir fries. Rotisserie is good too if you have one.

    It can be seared off whole in pan in about 15 minutes if you start from room temperature meat. Let it rest, then carve slices. OOPS, that's the Tenderloin I was thinking of, not a loin.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2014
  4. teamfat

    teamfat

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    I would brine it first.  There are a lot of recipes out there, like this one:

    http://allrecipes.com/recipe/pork-brine/

    Most of them are for chops, so you may need to adjust the amounts to make enough to cover the roast. If I were doing it, I'd probably throw a ham hock or two in the pot as well. Or maybe trotters ( feet ) to give it some extra help.

    And welcome to Cheftalk, hope we can assist.

    mjb.
     
  5. teamfat

    teamfat

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    Tuesday I had an Italian beef sandwich ( Mediteranean Deli, State & 39th ) a favorite of mine.  Wonder how pork would do in a similar dish?

    mjb.
     
  6. pollopicu

    pollopicu

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    I get meat like this when it's on super sale. Dry rub it with some spices, sear it, then roast it to about 138-140 internal temp., let it rest for a few min, then slice. juicy as can be. make it with a raisin curry chutney.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2014
  7. oldschool1982

    oldschool1982

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    Agree with the others that the rotisserie is a good thought and most definitely not the crock-pot. I did some work with another "chef" a couple years ago and she had me remove all of the fat., There's so little, it's not worth worrying about. Anyhow, she used the oven like a crock-pot and we roasted the meat for what seemed like forever only to have it turn to shred when we went to slice. I wasn't driving so all I could do is sit back and watch. That's a Boston Butt method.

    Here's my suggestion.

    From the weight, it sounds like an entire loin. If it were me, since I buy them this way and am also needing to watch what I eat, I would take the loin end, that's the side where you have a split between the dark and light meat (hope I remembered that correctly) and cut off about 6" of the whole. The darker meat is part of the tenderloin and helps make some rather tasty Italian sausage. It's really lean and still flavorful with much less fat than a Boston Butt. Yet, I wouldn't suggest buying tenderloin because of the expense. Anyhow, I season my IT sausage with fennel, salt, pepper and crushed red pepper but you can also add things like garlic and even different varieties of dried peppers. Arbol is a good choice.

    The remainder, starting at the rib end this time ( that's where the ribs start and again, hope that's correct), cut into boneless chops about 1" thick. I usually cut about 4-6.  If you have a food saver, just vacuum seal them and freeze away. You could go thinner and make cutlets for schnitzel but then your adding calories and fats that are trying to be avoided. Grilling with light seasonings or just s&p goes a long way. Sometimes it's nice to just taste the pork.

    The remainder I usually coat with Dijon mustard, chopped garlic, salt, pepper and something like fresh rosemary or thyme or maybe even both. I also place this in a food saver bag to let the flavors penetrate the meat overnight. You can also add a little olive oil and lemon juice or chardonnay but use sparingly with any restrictive diet. Then, all I do is remove from the bag, re-coat the spice mix (if necessary) and roast using the same idea behind the Prime Rib equation....that's sear for 15 minutes at something like 400 and cook the remainder at 10 minutes per pound but at 300, not 225 since rare is not what you're looking for. You could do this with the whole loin but I would still trim some of the tail off. being that I would have suggested to just cut in half and tie the two pieces together like we did years ago but that's a challenge for most unless you can get your hands on butchers netting.

    Not had any issues in decades and the pork turns our very moist and tender every time. Yet, the more I think about it, the rotisserie does sound good. Love rotisserie meats!

    edit; Hate to sound snobbish but..........Forgot to ask if this was one of those "jellified" moist and tender or equivalent products? Gawd, that is one process I wish would disappear!  If that's the case, disregard everything I suggested. You can't hurt it since it was lost to begin with.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2014
  8. mtullius

    mtullius

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    I buy the whole loin all the time. I make chops out of the middle, not too thick because i want to cook them fast until just done. Then on either side of the middle I make 2 small roasts that I cook like Pollopicu suggested. The ends I chunk for stir fry and green chile burritos. Don't overcook it and its great. 

    In Iowa the big thing is the "tenderloin" sandwich which is a slice of tenderloin or loin sliced thick enough so when you pound it out to about a half to quarter inch thick it is about twice as big as the bun you will use. Its important that it be WAY bigger than the bun! If you use a big bun you overlap a few slices and pound them together. Now dredge and fry like  chicken fried steak. Dress with ketchup, mustard, pickle and onion, maybe lettuce and tomato. There are a lot of people of German descent here so this is probably a  wienerschnitzel thing.

    Might also work as a scaloppini.
     
  9. chefross

    chefross

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    I'm surprised no one has mentioned cooking that pork loin by temperature and not time.

    This is the determining factor in dry versus moist meat.
     
  10. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Ditto (herb d'Provence is my favorite spice blend for a pork loin), except I often tend toward a pan sauce.

    As mentioned here and later by ChefRoss, cook to the temperature and it will be yummy.

    Leftovers tend to be dry if reheated so I often convert them (if there are any) to Chile Verde.

    Another yummy option would be pork braised in milk.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2014
  11. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Last edited: Jun 6, 2014
  12. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    Last edited: Jun 6, 2014
  13. oldschool1982

    oldschool1982

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    Butchers twine was a given with the original thought of tying them into a pork roast and the netting was suggested in the hopes of providing an easier method for a home cook. Not everyone can successfully tie a roast together on the first try and the net would have , for the most part, guaranteed success.
     
  14. oldschool1982

    oldschool1982

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    You make a good point and I probably should have offered a temp. This relates to me since I quit sticking a bio-therm in roasts years ago unless it is absolutely necessary. I hate opening any hole, no matter how small that allows the juice to escape. The thought escaped me.

    That being said, the minimum they say to cook pork to is 180. If you feel you need to cook it to that, then that's what you do. For us and if I had to put a temp down, I'd stick around 165-170. No detectable sign of it being raw and pink is not all that bad as long as the meat's juices are not running pink. Just use your best judgment since I don't want to get accused of giving erroneous information.
     
  15. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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  16. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    You can rely on experience when cooking pork, but indeed, only temperature control will give you security.

    It surprises me not to have read something about resting the meat. If there's one kind of meat where it's super important, then it's pork!

    Here's something I posted last year, pork loin and a variation of seasonal young vegetables.


    The rest of the story and more pictures in the original thread;

    http://www.cheftalk.com/t/69652/what-did-you-have-for-dinner/1560#post_432667
     
  17. oldschool1982

    oldschool1982

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    I did not know that. Cool! Then I revise my statement and cook to that temp. I've always hated the the higher temp and never cooked above medium at home. The 165-170 was trying to give a better shot without causing backlash. It hasn't happened yet, but that doesn't mean that it can't in the future.
     
  18. durangojo

    durangojo

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    Probably too late for you but another absolute favorite of mine aside from a porchetta 'bolognese' is to butterfly and stuff pork loin with dried fruit....butterfly, pound, brine, stuff, roll and tie in a neat little package....your filling could be lots of things if dried fruit is not your thing or you think it's too wintry....a spanokopita type filling or an italian accented one with prosciutto spinach, sun dried tomatoes, pine nuts,and raisins....that sort of thing...southwestern with green chilies or morracan spiced with a a fruit compote.....whichever way you choose, it needs a sauce or chutney or compote or something to accompany it imo.....i do think that brining is key.

    joey
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2014
  19. teamfat

    teamfat

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    My favorite pork loin stuffing is a mix of mushrooms, shallots, sweet peppers, maybe some celery or fennel or carrot, depending on what is on hand. I usually opt for a ginger flavored gravy.  Thought I had some photos of the last one, can't seem to find them at the moment.

    mjb.
     
  20. chelle

    chelle

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    I'd love to thank each and every one of you individually; I was absolutely stunned and delighted that my post received so many responses!  And from people who know their stuff, to boot!  I am so grateful!  We've not yet had a chance to go through everything, but we printed off all of your responses and will be reading everything shortly.  In the meanwhile, I just wanted to thank you all - SO MUCH - for offering such tremendous help!  What a glorious welcome to your little online community!  

    Much gratitude,

    Michelle