How to read a thermometer

23
1
Joined Jul 3, 2019
Can anyone tell me how to read this thermometer? I cant identify what are the numbers between 80 degees F up to 100 degrees f.

I have used this thermometer to try temper chocolates but i ended up not being able to properly temper milk chocolate that was required to be tempered from 86 - 88 degree f becoz i couldnt read the small lines between 80 - 100 F
 

Attachments

3,559
528
Joined Dec 18, 2010
... for candy, though, you might want to consider an easier to read thermometer. A few degrees makes a difference...
 
136
54
Joined Jan 9, 2019
Depending on the viewing angle, I sometimes put a red marker on the desired temp. for a "ballpark" temp... you have to read it at the same viewing angle every time.
Again, if you're reading it at an odd angle, you could be out by a few degrees.
Like others have said, a bigger display really helps.
 
23
1
Joined Jul 3, 2019
Depending on the viewing angle, I sometimes put a red marker on the desired temp. for a "ballpark" temp... you have to read it at the same viewing angle every time.
Again, if you're reading it at an odd angle, you could be out by a few degrees.
Like others have said, a bigger display really helps.
for the bigger display, what type of thermometer would you recommend me to use?
 

nicko

Founder of Cheftalk.com
Staff member
4,184
210
Joined Oct 5, 2001
Agree with the thermapen they are great. Very accurate and no guess work
 
5,277
761
Joined Oct 10, 2005
When tempering chocolate, I never rely on the thermometer. Oh, I use it to get in the ball park range, but tempering is also about motion and time, as well as temp.

I Like to use the large alcohol filled thermometers. Yeah, yeah, all the digital fans can scream at me now, but here’s why I find the large alcohol thermometers superior: The ends are very large, ( it has a larger surface area) so it “samples” a much larger amount of liquid, giving an OVERALL accurate temp. No one disputes that an electronic thermometer is accurate, but the probe is tiny, and the liquid it samples is tiny, giving you (imho) a less accurate overall reading.

Believe me, I tempered choc on a multiple time basis daily for ten years. I also cooked up batches of caramel on a daily basis— which is also very temperature sensitive. I’ve tried every kind of thermometer, and have also had over 10 thermometers in one batch of caramel— every one gave a different reading. There are hot spots and cool zones within that pot. After the second year I left all thermometers—except the large alcohol one- in a drawer, used the alcohol one to get me I need the general range, and used the “drop” method of dribbling a bit of liquid into ice water to get me to the perfect stage.

In the confectioners world, candy is sugar, and chocolate is chocolate, the words are not used interchangeably, just as you would not use “ motorhome” and “ forklift” interchangeably. A candy thermometer works at ranges well aabove boiling point, whereas a chocolate thermometer operates best at human body temperatures.

Hope this helps...
 

Latest posts

Top Bottom