How to move on from a job you like?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by katew, Sep 30, 2004.

  1. katew

    katew

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    You may remember me from my cooking school blog, and some accounts of my internship/current job at a racing track. I really like it there but it has become less of a challenge and also not enough money now that I am newly married and considering children and a house (or at least a better apartment) in the next few years. I know cooks as a rule don't tend to get paid much but I also know some cooks where I am working get paid more than I do--not sure how much more though.
    My plan has been to work there until March next year. That will make it a full year that I have worked in one place and my longest employment time to date. But I am so torn; I feel very fortunate where I am. Everyone is so nice and I am happy doing something I like to do. But I know I can't stay there forever.
    Would it be silly to ask for a raise, knowing I probably won't stay past March? Should I forget the raise and just work until March the way things are now? And ultimately, when it comes closer to March, how do I break my plan to my boss?
    Thanks.
     
  2. katew

    katew

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    Nobody's been in this position before? Hmm...
     
  3. mikeb

    mikeb

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    Theres lots of turnover in this industry, all managers know it, so just tell your boss strait up (when the time comes of course) that you're leaving (maybe give him the real reason why too, although be very diplomatic and don't insult the current place). Try to give 2 weeks to a month notice.

    I'd also ask for the raise right away, March is still quite far away...
     
  4. chefmikesworld

    chefmikesworld

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    Hey Kate,

    I have a few opinions on this one.

    First, I am making some assumptions, but here are a couple thoughts...

    If you are working at a race track, I am going to assume that it is with a contract company, I have worked for several contract corporations and am currently working at one, why not put in for a transfer to another property in a position that will offer you more money?

    If March will make a year, then you have been there six months and it would not be outlandish to ask for a raise as long as you are a person that knows how to push the envelope and always brings stuff to the table. If there are corporate restrictions on your position and money, which sometimes there most certainly are, then apply for another position at your current job that may give you a higher salary.

    At another contract service I was cheffing at, I had a line cook that was stupendous, she was all about rock and roll and always bringing ideas and systems to the table. I was restricted by human resources because she maxed out of her current capability to make any more money in her current position and this frustrated her. Finally one day she sent me an email, very tactfully written about her assets to the company, her love and passion for her job and was questioning what she had to do to make more money and to further her career within the company. I presented her argument augumented by her email to Food and Beverage and Human Resources which got her another dollar and last I heard she was an Executive Chef of a small performing arts center in Pennsylvania somewhere....just because of her passion she was able to cross that bridge that furthered her career into some decent money....

    Just some Cheffy Thoughts,
    Chef Mike
     
  5. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    I would say that you definitely want to get a year of continous employment on your resume. Any time I look at a resume with all employment of less than a year it raises red flags. Even though there may be very good reasons for the jumping around, I still can't help but wonder why. As for the raise, instead why not ask for a performance review. After the review, if it is favorable, use that as lead in to your request for a raise. When it comes time to leave, tell them the truth "I really like it there but it has become less of a challenge". Just be sure to give adequate notice, at least two weeks at the minimum.
     
  6. katew

    katew

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    Thanks for the advice--I was talking to one of my co-workers the other day and he said a couple people will be leaving in the next month or so, plus business always picks up in the winter, so I may be getting hours soon. Plus he says the boss and my coworkers are noticing that I'm good at what I do, and while that won't get me a raise if I don't ask, they may think of me first when they need someone to fill in. A lot of the cooks goof around too much or are just slackers in general and I really try not to do that.
    The turnover rate is very high, as was mentioned. Just in the two weeks I was gone for my wedding and honeymoon we lost two salad people, gained two more, and gained a couple new cashiers.
    There is not a whole lot of room for upward movement at the place--I don't particularly want to manage anyway. Basically all I can do is get better at what I do.
     
  7. hans.schallenbe

    hans.schallenbe

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    kateW, you seem to be young. you just tell your, boss, as in our profession we grew and earn more with experience. look for a challanging new job and learn more. hans schallenberg
    iscahm.com
     
  8. katew

    katew

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    I'm 25. Is that what you meant by young? :D
     
  9. hans.schallenbe

    hans.schallenbe

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    25 is still young, seek employment in places with a good culinary reputation, the more experience, the more rounded you will becom as a professional.

    hans