How to match meat pâté?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by sirlene, Oct 30, 2012.

  1. sirlene

    sirlene

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    Hi all,

    I got some meat pâté from my fathers-in-law, perfect home made German style with precise meat and spice combination. I would like to serve it on toast, as starter for a Spanish meal, but I thought of matching it with some other items. I´m not sure if they go well together or if that is just a "wrong" inspiration of mine... /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif

    Would it match with:
    1. Sweet preserved red cabbage on top?
    2. Plums chutney?
    3. Artichoke bottoms (preserved on vinegar)? In that case, all that on top of a toast or maybe use the artichoke bottoms as base for the pâté?
    I would like to keep with the above as I already have them at home.. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif

    Thanks for your help!

    Sirlene
     
  2. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    German pate with red cabbage, artichoke and chutney with a spanish meal for a starter???????

    NO WAY for me, Sorry
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2012
  3. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    What's the rest of the menu like?  I supposed the artichoke hearts would be the best imo.  But it is a little hard to imagine a german meat pate leading into a spanish styled theme.  Perhaps if you're making tapas it could be like a little visitor tapa?
     
  4. french fries

    french fries

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    Depending on the pate, the meat and the spices used, I would suggest: 

    - Cornichons (a.k.a. gherkins)

    - Olives

    - Capers
     
  5. genemachine

    genemachine

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    Hm, I am German, but I am not sure what exactly you mean with a German style pâté. The ones I am accustomed to, I'd pair with cornichons, as FrenchFries said. Can't really see how to fit them into a Spanish meal, but then, my knowledge about Spanish cookery is somewhat limited. Could you describe the pâté in more detail? I think the cabbage could work, if it has a strong flavour, e.g. heavy on liver or game.
     
  6. sirlene

    sirlene

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    Yes! I want to use the pâté (better explain it as "Leberwüst") as a starter. We can call it a tapa. I can either leave it there to be used on the toast, or I can mix it with the artichoke bottom, this last one is really more Spanish. Wouldn´t the Spanish have any similar pork pâté? I can leave without the chutney and the red cabbage.../img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
    Leberwüst with:

    Schwein Leber

    Mager Schwein Fleish

    Schwein Fett

    Zwiebel

    Knoblauch

    Ingwer

    Muskatnuss

    Pfeffer

    Thymian

    Basilikum

    Salz

    Yes, I guess you are right looking specifically to the pâté.. I want to have alternatives besides the cornichons, mustard.. I thought the Spanish starter would be a place to play with.../img/vbsmilies/smilies/lookaround.gif
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2012
  7. sirlene

    sirlene

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    French Fries... Is your suggestion of olives and capers related to the Spanish approach or to the meat (pork) pâté itself?

    The pâté in case has:

    pork liver
    pork meat

    pork fat
    onion
    garlic
    ginger
    nutmeg
    pepper
    thyme
    basil

    salt
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2012
  8. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    for me I like pate in a bahn mi which also has lighty pickled carrots, turnips and some cucumber along with some cilantro and boiled ham on a beautiful french roll

    so sirlene, the idea of pate on toast might be enhanced with some pickled veggies that you may have on hand and cilantro
     
    espin22 likes this.
  9. genemachine

    genemachine

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    Thanks for the update, Sirlene. Such liver pâtés are sometimes eaten with sweet-sour condiments, such as lingonberry jam, here in Germany. I still think the sweet red cabbage could actually work. Wouldn't rule out the chutney, either.

    Give it a try and trust your taste buds - it's not like there is a law that every food pairing has to be absolutely traditional! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
  10. espin22

    espin22

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    Pickled Eggs and Mustard Seed Caviar.
     
  11. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    None of these are classified Pat's they are "forcemeats" or  wurst  based.  Real pate is prepared and handled much differently and yes is served with cornishons.
     
  12. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    German leberwurst is Ameircan liverwurst.  I'm not sure what classification system Ed is using, but liverwurst is a pate according to most meanings of the word. 

    Liverwurst is hardly delicate, and I think any of your suggestions would work with it -- although you want to be careful with artichokes if you're going to pair the pate course with wine.  The chutney is a very interesting idea.  It wouldn't work with a lot of pates, but liverwust -- yep. 

    Liverwurst tends to be a little sticky and is best spread on bread, like a sort of meat butter, then topped.  You might want to serve ii already spread on some sort of toasted bread, e.g., crouton, crostini, bruschetta, etc., and serve a few toppings and other assorted "nibbles" along side.

    In my opinion, liverwurst wants strong partners, the stronger the better.  You want at least one very strong mustard on the plate, perhaps some grapes or apples, some walnuts or almonds, and a couple of strong cheeses -- at least one of them hard.  Sweet and briny are also good tastes to cut through the richness of liver.  So some sort of pickle like cornichon, sweet gherkins, pickled onion, etc., would also be nice on the plate.  

    If you like, you can dress up liverwurst by mashing in additions like brown butter with (flamed-off) cognac, chopped pistachios, chopped truffle, etc., then reforming into a tube shape or pressing it into a container, and allowing a day in the fridge for the flavors to marry.

    BDL  
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2012
  13. genemachine

    genemachine

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    From a german perspective, Leberwurst spans a whole spectrum from a very coarse "Bauernleberwurst" (liver sausage farmer style) to "Leberpastete", which is definitely a pâté. I second BDL's opinion here, though I think it depends a bit on the style of the Wurst - for the coarse side of things, yes, strong mustard, cornichons, for the "Leberpastete" side of things, I'd go on the sweet side.

    GM
     
  14. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    German liverwurst is Brunsweiger and American is fillers and whatever that is classification system I use. If you went to a place and you ordered pate and they served you a slice of liverwurst how would you react.?.. The strong flavors are a far cry from a real French Style Pate  be it country or classic style as is the richness to the palate..
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2012
  15. genemachine

    genemachine

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    Sorry, Ed, but our classification systems might differ here. Liverwurst is a far cry from Braunschweiger. My uncle was a German small village butcher, and I spent long hours in his shop in my childhood. Leberpastete is a pâté. Forcemeat, wrapped in fat, poached in a terrine in a bain marie. If that does not fit the definition of pâté, I don't know what the word means. And that IS a traditional style here.
     
  16. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    If the pate in question were a mousse de foie de porc, I wouldn't be much surprised to get something indistinguishable from the liverwurst we ordinarily get.  Similarly, I wouldn't be much surprised if I got kreplach when I ordered won ton.  Same things, different names.  

    Every December I make tons of mousse de foie with both chicken and pork liver to give as gifts which -- from a texture standpoint -- is a lot like a smooth liverwurst; but is so loaded with truffle and cognac,you'd never confuse it with Oscar Mayer. 

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2012
  17. french fries

    french fries

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    Actually they were more something to match the pate, independently of approach... more based on my own experience as we eat a LOT of various types of pates in France. 

    Pate and cornichons is a classic for me. Kinda like tomatoes and basil. 
     
  18. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    Now your talking cognac, fine herbs etc that to me is a pate be it mousse style or country en croute.  Smoothest wurst I have found commercial  here anyway is the small Jones Farm Brand its pretty good/
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2012
  19. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Same for me FF.

    Petals.