How to make the most potato-y mashed potatoes?

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Joined Dec 9, 2020
Hi y'all,

So I just joined here to ask for your help. You see, I'm a potato-addict and one of my favorite ways of ingesting potatoes is to make a mash. Problem is, I can't really get the potato-high I want. I always end up feeling I want a more intense potato flavor.

I've only tried the traditional way of boiling potatoes (with the skin on), and obviously using lots of butter for the mash. Tried it with different starchy and waxy potatoes, including Ratte following Joel Robuchon's recipe. My preference tends towards very starchy potatoes, and fluffy mash. None, however, have given me and intense enough potato flavor.

Do you have any advice for getting the most intense potato flavor possible?
 
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Joined Dec 9, 2020
Hi y'all,

So I just joined here to ask for your help. You see, I'm a potato-addict and one of my favorite ways of ingesting potatoes is to make a mash. Problem is, I can't really get the potato-high I want. I always end up feeling I want a more intense potato flavor.

I've only tried the traditional way of boiling potatoes (with the skin on), and obviously using lots of butter for the mash. Tried it with different starchy and waxy potatoes, including Ratte following Joel Robuchon's recipe. My preference tends towards very starchy potatoes, and fluffy mash. None, however, have given me and intense enough potato flavor.

Do you have any advice for getting the most intense potato flavor possible?
After years of hand mashing potatoes, over the Thanksgiving break I found an old style cake mixer/beater in my garage, the one with the two metal beaters that push into it.
I always prefer to use Yukon Golds, with or without skin, and this beater Really made fabulous potatoes. We all are aware of over mixing which would release starches and turn it yucky, but this was so awesome I doubt I’ll ever go back to hand mashing.
i’ve also used a potato ricer and that was just a pain.
so that will handle the fluffy part in my opinion, but intense potato flavor is kind of subjective.
 
1,832
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Joined Aug 15, 2003
try fortifying your milk/cream with potato peels and/or scraps to make a quick potato "stock" that you can use to add to and thin out your mash.
 
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Joined Mar 1, 2017
Best Mashed Potatoes: **The NOT heart healthy, served only at holidays version**

1. Russets or Yukon Golds peeled and boiled until just cooked - if they're large potatoes, 1 to 1.5 per adult. If they're small, 2 to 3 per adult.
2. Drain thoroughly
3. Return potatoes to their pot and place over low heat
4. Add a stick of butter, 3-4 tbsps at a time, for every 3 potatoes (if large) or every 4-6 potatoes if small and mash until all the butter is absorbed. Don't over mash or the texture will degrade and produce potatoes with a "gluey" texture. Yes, you could end up using over 1lb of butter, closer to 2 lbs for a holiday dinner. Trust me. These will be the best potatoes you've ever had.
5. Continue until the allotment of butter is has been added and mashed in
6. (Optional) Add 1/4 to 1/2 cup of heavy cream until the desired texture/consistency is reached in lieu of some of the butter. For a service of 4 adults, you could easily use 1lb of butter.

Suggestions:

- Avoid using an electric mixer as this can easily overwhip the potatoes and make them "gluey"
- If adding cream, gently warm it before adding it - do not let it boil
- use room temperature butter
- avoid using potatoes that are waxy such as red potatoes or fingerlings
- salt the cooking water generously
- make sure the potatoes are cut uniformly as possible to reduce uneven cooking
- add the potatoes to the pot when the water is cold and then let them all come up to cooking temp together in the pot covered by about an inch of water
- don't soak or rinse the peeled potatoes before cooking. You want that starch. It helps make the potatoes creamy. Soaking or rinsing the potatoes can remove enzymes leaving behind "glue" that won't break down when cooking leaving the potatoes stiff rather than soft.

Happy holidays! :)
 
2
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Joined Dec 9, 2020
After years of hand mashing potatoes, over the Thanksgiving break I found an old style cake mixer/beater in my garage, the one with the two metal beaters that push into it.
I always prefer to use Yukon Golds, with or without skin, and this beater Really made fabulous potatoes. We all are aware of over mixing which would release starches and turn it yucky, but this was so awesome I doubt I’ll ever go back to hand mashing.
i’ve also used a potato ricer and that was just a pain.
so that will handle the fluffy part in my opinion, but intense potato flavor is kind of subjective.
That sounds like a good way of getting a fluffy mash. I usually just use a fork. The ricer I've found is only good for getting a smooth and even result, which is nice is that's what you're going for. I personally like a little unevenness and imperfection.
What I do is first let the potatoes steam off and then I gently break them down with a fork. I do this on a still hot stove so that I release as much water as possible. When it's fine and powdery I add butter and start mixing.
I whisk/mix like I want to get as much air as possible into the mash. It's like folding the mash in over itself over and over.
I don't know exactly what releases the most starch, but I've found that if I take care and do it this way I get a fluffy mash that's not gluey.
try fortifying your milk/cream with potato peels and/or scraps to make a quick potato "stock" that you can use to add to and thin out your mash.
That's a great idea! How would you go about it? Here's what I'm thinking.

First brown the potato peels in a pan - maybe using beef tallow for an interesting taste. Season with salt and a touch of vinegar. Then let it simmer in milk for... well, until it tastes really potatoey? Maybe a couple of hours will do?

I need to try this for the weekend.
 
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Joined Dec 18, 2010
Here’s what I do with great success:

- boil Russet potato in salted water until done
- drain into a strainer so water and steam can escape for a few minutes
- Rice with finest ricer grid back into hot cooking pan
- Add heavy/whipping/manufacturing cream and mix with spoon to desired consistency. Takes very little mixing!
- season with salt and white pepper.

AWARD WINNING AND EASY.
 
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David Chang just did a podcast episode on mashed potatoes that's worth listening to https://www.theringer.com/2020/12/1/21754976/who-makes-the-best-mashed-potatoes He's hilarious.

What people look for in mashed potatoes is completely individual. YOU say you want a more potatoey flavor. In that case I would look to getting really really good potatoes, the best you can find. Organic, pull them out of the ground yourself type of potatoes. In my opinion the best mashed potatoes is made from a mix of potatoes, half idaho spudz, and half yukon gold.

Next thing you can try is steaming the potatoes instead of boiling them. I think with boiling they drink up a lot of water and steaming may result in them cooking inside their own juices, maintaining more flavor.

I would also get skimpy on the milk or cream, you don't want to water down the flavor of the potato. And do your best to steam out the potatoes as best you can after peeling them.

Steer clear of added flavors like garlic or herbs, if you want potato punch stick to the basic flavors of potato and butter - season very well. Adding a tiny bit of acid can also do wonders in bringing out that potato flavor like lemon juice or a bit of mustard.
 
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