how to make coffee syrup?

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by siduri, Jan 7, 2011.

  1. siduri

    siduri

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    The post on coffee whipped cream reminded me that i wanted to know how to make coffee syrup for use in stuff like whipped cream, pastry cream, buttercream, to flavor mascarpone or cream cheese, or ice cream based on meringue italienne,  etc. 

    It should be syrupy rather than liquid, that is, some sort of sugar syrup with a strong coffee syrup. 

    I don;t want grinds in it. 

    I really like american coffee and would like to be able to make coffee syrup with the american roasted coffee i get in a special food store here.

    A dense syrup should not deflate whipped cream and should not cause crystal formation in the ice cream based on meringue italienne. 

    thanks
     
  2. dillonsmimi

    dillonsmimi

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    How about a reduced simple syrup with a few drops of LorAnn coffee oil added to it?

    Go lightly and see how it tastes.

    You could just reduce your coffee, but I fear it will turn nasty and bitter, kinda along the lines of hospital waiting room brew.

    mimi
     
  3. chefross

    chefross

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    I will steep coffee grounds with tap water overnight, then allow the liquid to drain through a couple of filters into a pan, then I allow it to simmer slowly on the stove on low temperature until I get the consistency I want.
     
  4. siduri

    siduri

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    Thanks, chefross.  Does it not get that burnt coffee taste when you simmer it?  is it the low temp?  i imagine i could add sugar here before simmering, right?  I'd like something i can keep on hand, in the fridge, but that won't go bad. 
     
  5. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Make espresso and let it evaporate at room temp overnight. Add to simple syrup.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2011
  6. heavenlycookies

    heavenlycookies

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    I would try using a simple syrup base and adding in instant coffee grounds. Typically they are slightly large pieces of coffee and can stay like that when added into room temp/cold thick consistencies but if you grind them a little extra they become a fine powder. You can then have the ability to add as much coffee flavor (and caffeine level) as you like.
     
  7. siduri

    siduri

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    Thanks HC.  I know i can use instant coffee - but that's what i wanted to avoid.  Instant coffee has a different taste.  I wanted to make an infusion of real coffee to make a coffee  syrup.  The instant coffee "grounds" are not grounds, they;re just dried crystals of actual brewed coffee, but instant doesn;t taste as good as real. 
     
  8. chefedb

    chefedb

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    I would make this same way only add a touch of cream of tartar and a bit of corn syrup to aid blending and to avoid crystals when stored.for a while.If no instant then brew some coffee reduce it and use that as a base. The cheaper the coffee you use the stronger it will be.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2011
  9. harry coates

    harry coates

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    I can't see how any boiling and simmering 'reduction' would work - the usual hot pans under electric coffee makers destroy coffee in 5-10 minutes - and that is a lot less heat than simmering. Even McD's is supposed to dump unsold coffee after 10 minutes.

    While the OP preferred 'American' coffee, I am thinking using a mild espresso grind might be the way to go - but not sure what extraction process would result in good syrup. 
     
  10. chefross

    chefross

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    The filtering action of this process gets rid of the coffee tannins that make the undesirable bitter taste
     
  11. harry coates

    harry coates

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    What kind of filters do you use? If they are mechanical filters I don't see how tannins would be removed as the tannins will be dissolved at a molecular level. If they would be chemical filters - wouldn't they have to be specific to tannins? And if they were, what kind of conversion or absorption 'chemical' would be involved?

    I don't want to seem argumentative but my experience with coffee over the years has been so often disappointing due to the almost 'immediate' destruction of coffee when exposed to even moderate heat. I recall a Scientific American article in the 70's (which I have unsuccessfully searched for) that went on for pages and pages showing organic chemical molecular drawings with the multiple changes of the attached radicals, etc when subject to heat. Thus my skepticism about simple filtering and there being just one guilty 'chemical' (tannin).

    So please do give specifics - as it does seem you are succeeding.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2014
  12. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Use instant coffee for whipped cream, or cream cheese . For syrup use left over morning coffee, sugar, and corn syrup, a drop of cream of tartar. Cook till it sticks to a stainless steel spoon, then cool.
     
  13. harry coates

    harry coates

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    "Cook till it sticks to a stainless steel spoon, then cool."

    How can this work out? For years and years,all coffee I've tasted that has been kept hot for more than 10-15 mins (save for in a vacuum pot) - or been re-heated longer than just getting it 'hot' has been bitter and acrid. 
     
  14. lagom

    lagom

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    @Harry Coates " bitter and acrid". You must have met my mother in law. 😀. I'll be here all week folks, try the veal. 😛

    Sorry, couldn't resist.
     
  15. chefross

    chefross

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    I was in a gourmet grocery store in the mid 80"s and found this device that was simply a white gallon size bucket with a dense cloth and fiber like filter that is placed on the bottom.

    A pound can of ground coffee goes in the bucket (any brand works) and is filled with water.

    This steeps for 24 hours.

    Uncork the bottom and allow the syrup to drain.

    This process allowed you to place a small amount of this syrup in a coffee cup then fill with hot water and you have a cup of coffee with no bitterness and full of flavor.

    As I experimented with this liquid, I found I could reduce it for a syrup without the bitterness accompanying the flavor. Who knew.  I think it was called the "Toddie Coffee Saver."
     
  16. harry coates

    harry coates

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    That is most interesting.

    I'm a chemical engineer (non-practicing) and trying to figure it out - as well as synching it with the Scientific American article of years ago.

    The only thing that occurs to me at this point is that it is consistent with what I have heard about NOT subjecting coffee grounds to boiling water - or at least the less the better. (I, myself, make morning coffee by pouring water-just-oiff-the-boil over grounds in a Melitta-type filter).

    What I can think is you are getting into solution the main 'good taste' elements of the coffee with cold water over a ''longer' time. The 'bad' stuff is not getting in there - and you are able to then subject that filtered liquid to 100C+ temps.

    Gotta try - just hoping your filters aren't from the Planet Krypton.
     
  17. chefedb

    chefedb

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    You are adding sweeteners that counteracts the bitterness
     
  18. chefedb

    chefedb

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    In the army we used to put a one pound pack of coffee in an apron, tie it and drop it into boiling water  let it steep take it out and wella  coffee for 60 cups.