how to make borscht (beet soup) sour?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by gbhunter, Jul 6, 2005.

  1. gbhunter

    gbhunter

    Messages:
    74
    Likes Received:
    11
    What is best to make borscht sour? Lemon juice, or vinegar? maybe even both? :confused: :chef:
     
  2. chinds85

    chinds85

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    10
    I think when keeping an authentic borscht in mind, a touch of vinegar would be a better thing to add for sour taste. I'm not sure if many borscht recipes call for lemon juice (that would be more towards the mediterranean). If you arent going for authentic, I would imagine that either choice would create an equally delicious outcome, though I do not have very much experience with this slavic soup. Good luck and perhaps someone else will be able to give you much better information.
     
  3. lifer

    lifer

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    i have always used the brine from a jar of pickles
     
  4. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

    Messages:
    7,375
    Likes Received:
    68
    Exp:
    Professional Caterer
    I've twisted a beet and chevre salad to make a borscht.....
    cook beets in water, puree, add salt to taste, dillweed, scallions or chives then top a reduced sherry viniager/syrup and chevre.

    The Crossing boys did a salad with beets, chevre and sherry viniagrette.....
    I just took the combo and twisted it.
     
  5. chrose

    chrose

    Messages:
    2,518
    Likes Received:
    33
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Perhaps you can add Sorrel which is used to make Schav another Russian dish. It's funny but when you look up Schav you can find all sorts of stories about no one in the family particularly liking it except Dad who would suck it down like a beer from the fridge, and that was my Dad to a T!
    Anyway here's a link that might help a bit?
    http://www.thefoodmaven.com/diary/ar.../00000027.html
     
  6. suzanne

    suzanne

    Messages:
    3,853
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Food Editor
    When my mother made borscht, she added Sour Salt, which is just crystals of citric acid. I don't know if it's still available in the spice section, because my jar (French's brand) is still fine after maybe 20+ years. :rolleyes:

    I like the idea of using pickle brine, especially if it's dill pickles; gets the flavor without changing the color. To me, the color is the best part, and adding anything that could muddy it would make it much less appealing (sorry, chrose! borscht is borscht and schav is schav and never the twain shall meet, at least not in my kitchen :p )
     
  7. chrose

    chrose

    Messages:
    2,518
    Likes Received:
    33
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Actually you're quite right, and I couldn't agree more! :D
     
  8. mikeb

    mikeb

    Messages:
    320
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Professional Pastry Chef
    Distilled white vinegar...
     
  9. ralph dratman

    ralph dratman

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    Sour salt is definitely still available, probably in the spice section of your grocery store, and also under its more official name: citric acid. I have a pound of the stuff, which is a white powder, in my garage. I use it to pickle -- not cucumbers, but steel. Nevertheless, what I have is food grade and can be used without fear in any edible you wish, for tartness. The stuff is added to fruit drinks, soda pop, salad dressing and so forth, and also functions as a preservative.
     
  10. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

    Messages:
    963
    Likes Received:
    85
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    If you are making a traditional Polish beet borscht, you start with a fermented beet juice base called kvass.

    I just realized how old this thread is.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2016
  11. cheflayne

    cheflayne

    Messages:
    4,194
    Likes Received:
    554
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I have nothing against old, hell I am old. The discussion and your reply are both still valid and relevant; as I like to think, so am I. :~)
     
    chicagoterry likes this.