How to Make a Perfect Hard Boiled Egg :)

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Joined Jan 23, 2010
thought i would share this ...


depending on the size of a average chicken egg bought from your local supermarket or farm they approximately take between 12 - 13 minutes of cooking time in boiling water to be fully cooked hard boiled, start from eggs placed in a pan with cold water and then heated up.

all egg timers out the window, all you have to do is take the egg out of the water with a slotted spoon and place gently on a flat even work surface with lots of space, then with your thumbs and index fingers spin the egg on the spot as fast as you can while taking extra care so that it doesn't spin off your work surface.

if the hard boiled egg is cooked it will spin upright on its end without wabbling. if the egg spins and wabbles without standing upright while spinning then it is not cooked properly.


also note that if upon checking the yolk is cooked but is also has a greenish discolouration around the outside this means that the egg is overcooked.

i hope i have been informative /img/vbsmilies/smilies/cool.gif
 
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Joined Feb 4, 2010
I do cook hard-boiled eggs but I find 10 minutes (using the method you described) is enough for large eggs. I try to use minimum cooking time to avoid the greenish coloration (caused by sulfur) around the yolks. I use the US Egg Board suggestion to make peeling easier: immerse the just-cooked eggs in cold water for 30 sec, then back to hot water for another 30 seconds, then chill the eggs. Eggs cracked and let sit in water for a while also helps to release from the shell.
 
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Joined Jan 23, 2010
^ i too have that problem sometimes when peeling/shelling eggs it is hard to get the shell away without the flesh still sticking to it, i have yet to find out what causes the problem

can remember doing a paper at college about the anatomy of an egg stating that an egg consists of two whites (one more plump than the other in shape), a yolk (or in some cases two), a skin, and an outer shell.

.
 
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Joined Oct 10, 2005
The older the egg, the easier it is to peel.  If you don't believe me, try peeling a freshly laid egg and a supermarket egg that's around 3 weeks old.

Whith *astard H.B.. eggs that refuse to peel, the trick is to get a hold of the skin just underneath the shell and peel this instead of the shell. 
 
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Joined Mar 16, 2005
After trying various methods to get eggs that peel without sticking I resorted to a method that is similar to spirit to all my previous attempts but actually works consistently... it hasn't failed me yet, regardless of the age of the egg (the air bubble inside is usually a good indicator).

I also do the cook from cold water method, 10 minutes then immediately run the whole pot under cold water, start peeling after about thirty seconds in.
 
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Joined Feb 13, 2008
In addition to everything else you ladies and gentlemen (dudes and dudettes) are doing you might try adding some vinegar and salt to the water you use to boil the eggs.  But no matter what you do, sometimes they're just a bear. For one thing, as farmers switch to cheaper feed with less protein the shells get thinner and harder to peel.  Feeds for layers are calculated to make eggs just strong enough not to crack under the weight of the hen.

Oddly (or not) all of you cook eggs more well done than I do -- although George and I are at least on the same page. 

For eggs which will be served halved, as in salads and ramen, I like the egg either not quite or just barely set.  For an XL egg that's 8 or 9 minutes respectively in boiling water, followed by shocking in cold water. 

For eating out of hand, egg salads and the like, i.e., when you want the yolk a bit more set, I put them in cold water, bring to a boil over medium high, let them stay at a full  boilfor one minute exactly, remove from the heat, cover, and allow the water to cool to room temperature.

Sometimes I roast eggs in a very slow oven.  That works quite well and doesn't require very exact timing.  You can let them go pretty much forever. 

BDL
 
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Joined Oct 28, 2008
BDL, roasting the eggs sounds like a very interesting method. Do you just fire them in the oven on a bed of salt? What temp would you do that at?
 
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Joined Feb 13, 2008
There are any number of ways to hard cook eggs by roasting.  The easiest is to preheat the oven to 180F, put as many eggs as you like in a sheet pan, and put the sheet pan in the oven for 90 minutes -- although you can let it go longer without doing too much damage.

Alternatively, you can put them in a 325F oven for 30 minutes and that will do quite nicely.  Some people ascribe this method to Alton Brown, and he not only did a show with it, it is in one of his cookbooks too.  However, he was by no means the first person to stick an egg in a hot oven, and I'm sure he'd be the first person to say so.  Alton recommended putting the eggs directly on the oven racks (presumably for better air circulation) and putting a pan on the bottom of the oven to catch any drips in case an egg or two breaks.

They (eggs, not Altons) do very well in the hot ashes of a camp fire as well.

BDL
 
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Joined Jan 23, 2010
BDL i am against the idea of roasting eggs on principle that it would make the oven inside to look like cooked egg-popcorn!
 
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Joined Mar 21, 2010
 I've always had success putting the eggs in cold water, bringing to a boil, removing from the heat and covering the pot. I let it stand for 15 minutes and i've always had the perfect egg....

P.S. I also stir the eggs while they are coming to a boil, I find it centers the yolk.../img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif
 
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Joined Mar 3, 2010
the way my chef showed me this last quarter is he put in the water, once it boils remove form heat cover and let it stand for 10 min and it should be done. works everytime for me.
 
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Joined Mar 21, 2010
Skatz,,,,, How bout we say 12 n 1/2 minutes... You down with that... LOL...  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif
 
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Joined Mar 3, 2010
lol i guess it depends though, how fast your water boils and what kind of pot u are using....
 
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Joined Aug 21, 2009
I start with cold water and once it comes to a boil I let them go for about 12 minutes.  I've never heard of roasting them, that's an interesting way to make them.  As for peeling, I let someone else do that...I'm allergic to eggs and the smell of a hard boiled egg makes me feel ill.  Funny though I can cook them on the flat top all day long and never have a problem.
 
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Joined Jan 23, 2010
it is not possible to roast an egg without it exploding in the oven ... even when cooking eggs in the microwave they have to be taken out the shell first ... there is no way that you can cook an egg in an oven/microwave oven while the egg is still in it's shell, the egg would just explode!!!
 
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Joined Dec 8, 1999
it is not possible to roast an egg without it exploding in the oven ... even when cooking eggs in the microwave they have to be taken out the shell first ... there is no way that you can cook an egg in an oven/microwave oven while the egg is still in it's shell, the egg would just explode!!!
Like lots of other things, it can be done, but you have to know how.
 
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Joined Aug 21, 2009
Actually come to think of it I have seen someone do eggs in the steamer oven .  I was a little wary of it myself (this guy tended to put speed ahead of safety) but the eggs came out just fine with no breakage at all.   The guy was a floater and would come in if the chef (or head cook) was off and he worked at all of the locations the company had.  A few weeks after he demonstrated his egg technique to me, a memo came around from head office.  Apparently someone had taken his advice and used a hotel pan in the steamer oven to do eggs and ended up with burns from the boiling water that had accumulated in the pan, so from that day forward we were not allowed to use hotel pans in the steamer but were to use the steamer pans only (and the only person to use hotel pans in the steamer was this guy) and eggs were to be boiled in a pot on the stove.  
 
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Joined Jan 23, 2010
there's nothing wrong with steaming eggs ... there is a Hobart pressure steamer at work and eggs sometimes get cooked in there, take about 6 minutes maybe ... steaming is fine because it is similar to boiling since water can't reach a higher temperature than 100 degrees celcius
 
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