How to make a nice quick stock?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by chrisbristol, Dec 15, 2014.

  1. chrisbristol

    chrisbristol

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    Hello

    Does anyone have any advice on making a nice quick stock probably a chicken or beef stock? This is for home use I don't really have the time to cook it for 10 hours but I know there are ways to make nice stock in an hour or 2. Possibly with using a slow cooker. Any advice?
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2014
  2. cheftux

    cheftux

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    it's the roasting the bones that will give you the flavor, don't need to let it simmer for 10 hours.  just get a good color on the bones and then simmer for two hours. still mighty tasty
     
  3. chrisbristol

    chrisbristol

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    I would imagine that just cooking it for a couple of hours or so you would get a better stock than a stock cube or bullion. From what have read cooking stock in a pressure cooker will get you a better stock. Some people even think it is better than a slow stock.
     
  4. chrisbristol

    chrisbristol

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    Just another question. In my old place they use to cook the bones in the oven with some tomato purée then put them in the stock pot and deglaze the tray. I think that was done because they couldn't fit the chicken in the pot to fry it properly. What is the tomato purée for and if I were to fry them of in the pan with  some tomato purée then deglaze the pan with some wine would that be OK?
     
  5. chefross

    chefross

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    Oh wow!!!

    You might as well use beef and chicken bases, it you are not going to make stock the correct way.

    Why bother?

    Chicken stock takes 2-4 hours. Beef 6-8 hours. You want to do this right, you need to FIND the time to do it.
     
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  6. alaminute

    alaminute

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    I've only ever used tomato paste when roasting veal bones, but every one makes stock I little different. It's just stock so you can just deglaze with water to get your fond, I wouldn't want to fudge with something so universally simply perfect as stock as to hit with wine. Wandering off into court bouillon. And for any general method I totally agree with chefross, in fact my veal stocks usually take four days: v1 for 10, wash then v2 for another ten, combine and reduce for 10 to make fv.
    That being said pressure cookers freakin rock!!!!! Best stocks ever, chicken in two hours and veal in six. When you pull the veal bones out you can literally push your finger straight through a ball joint like it's wet sand. Incredible. Their also king for cooking octo, most tender octo ever in an hour or so.
     
  7. kingfarvito

    kingfarvito

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    I'll second the pressure cooker, beautiful stocks with great mouth feel
     
  8. fablesable

    fablesable

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    I use a slow cooker (crock pot) if I have to do a ton of running around while it cooks or a pressure cooker if I am at home with tons of other things to do but I can monitor it.
     
  9. chrisbristol

    chrisbristol

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    I forgot to mention that the purée was used with beef stock.

    Well I've bought a pressure cooker today. Hopefully going to make  stock tomorrow. I'm not not entirely shore whether it will set and so I could use it on its own as a gravy but if it doesn't would it be OK to mix chicken stock with the juices form the turkey and make a gravy with it for Christmas(we eat turkey at Christmas in England) or would it not taste hat nice mixing  chicken stock with Turkey meat juices?
     
  10. chefboyog

    chefboyog

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    Mix it. Its fine, even better perhaps. You dont want to run out of gravy!
     
  11. blueicus

    blueicus

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    Use a pressure cooker
     
  12. alaminute

    alaminute

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    It's kind of a standard to stretch turkey gravy with chicken stock.
     
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  13. chrisbristol

    chrisbristol

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    Hi

    How well does stock freeze? I am thinking of making some and freezing it.
     
  14. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    It freezes well. I make chicken stock ice cubes as well as freezing in bulk.
     
  15. notswedishchef

    notswedishchef

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    another vote for pressure cooker stocks......better than making it the traditional way in my opinion. 
     
  16. chefbutters

    chefbutters

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    Doesn't exist... Nice, quick don't run with stock.. LOW AND SLOW or buy it at the store... To be honest.
     
  17. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    It may be important to point out for the original poster that stocks do not take hours of work. They sit on the stove and simmer for hours. While you can step over and skim it once in awhile, you are free to perform other household tasks while the stock is cooking. So a veal or beef stock may take 6 or more hours to cook correctly, you are not tied to the stove for those hours. 

       A while ago I bought three old hens at my local asian market, made about three gallons of very rich stock and then reduced it to about a quart. . Frozen in small containers for use as needed and just add water to bring back to stock consistency.  So one afternoon to make stock but months of having it on hand.  It's worth the time. 
     
  18. mckallidon

    mckallidon Banned

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    You don't need a slow cooker.  I like a nice low and slow personally, but will not get into all the different ways.  They all have their pros and cons. 

    This is what I do if I use a carcass left over from a roasted chicken.  I throw in all the bones and random scraps.  2-3 onions cut into quarters with the skin on.  5 cloves of garlic.  I just give them a quick light crush to open them, nothing more; I don't bother with the skin.  2-3 carrots cut up into a few pieces.  1 or two celery ribs cut into 2 or 3 pieces.  I use a lot of parsley at home so I'll put the scrap stems and some full pieces in.  2 bay leaves.  10 whole peppercorns.  Maybe some thyme if it is around.  And, a tsp of apple cider vinegar.  supposedly this helps break down collagen and get more minerals from the bones, which is what is so yummy and good in stock.  I don't know if it matters or not but I just do it anyways.  I put water in to cover it a little and then some.  Don't use a lid.  You can accidently get it to an agitating boil.  Do not do this.  I put it on medium heat and when I notice the water is hot, I turn it down so that eventually you get a simmer bubble here or there but nothing much more.  I set a timer for 8 hrs and leave it be just like this.  Once in a while you may need to skim some gunk off the top.  After the 8 hrs I let it rest for 1 hr.  Then I strain the stock.  Then, cool it.  Skim the fat off the top.  Reduce or freeze or use. 

    But remember, there is more than one way to make a good stock, or use it. 

    People tend to experiment and find what they like.  I'd say take it all in and try it all out. 
     
  19. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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    actually according to mcgee you and I are wrong. bones can be boiled and will disperse and impart compounds etc we consider desirable in our stocks for up to 32 hours (simmering). 8 hours of simmering typically extracts only 20% of what is available. Not sure how pressure cookers may affect the rate of dispersion, slow cookers are definitely not going to get the job done faster than a stovetop solution though.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2015
  20. mckallidon

    mckallidon Banned

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    True story.  But that is only for roasted bones.  If you did that with any raw carcass, you'd get all sorts of nasties in there.  A pressure cooker would increase the rate of this process.  As you increase pressure, you need more energy (heat) to get the same effect on the liquid (boiling), because the pressure keeps the water molecules from escaping off the surface as steam.  You need more energy to overcome this.  This increase in energy creates more motion of the water molecules which increases the rate that they dissolve the bones.