How to keep the oil clean in a deep fryer? (for serving in a market stall)

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by popbox, Oct 21, 2015.

  1. popbox

    popbox

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    Hi, 

    My name is Tiffany and I've recently signed up to a one-day market event in London. I will be making fried chicken and fried pork cutlet. I've been doing it from home, in a single deep fat fryer. I don't fry in big portions so I change the oil every week (as I only use it one-two days a week). 

    I have no experience in running a market stall so I'm a bit nervous. I'm going to rent a double deep fryer, a larger one but they still come with baskets. I have a few concerns:

    - The event is from 12 - 8, how can I prolong my oil from getting too dark? I do try to scoop up all the crumbly bits but a lot gets stuck underneath the metal panel at the base of the fryer. How do I clean that when I need to use the fryers all day?

    - The coating I'm using is a wet coating so the chicken often gets stuck to the basket. Can I omit the basket and just drop it into the fryer itself? I tried it once with my single fryer at home and it sunk to the bottom and was almost stuck to the metal panel at the base again...I do the 'swimming' technique but it still sticks...

    - Should I be changing the entire tank of oil half day through the event?

    Thank you so much for your help and sorry for all the questions!

    Tiffany
     
  2. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    How much will you be cooking? 1000 portions or 200? explain your breading/batter a bit more.
     
  3. mike9

    mike9

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    With good oil that shift is nothing to worry about.  Get a good fine mesh skimmer with a long handle and clean the floaters out so they don't burn.  You should be good to go.  The key is good quality oil and keeping it clean.
     
  4. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    In addition to skimming the oil frequently, I would suggest having some extra oil on hand. All that fried chicken will absorb some oil so you may find you have less oil in the fryer as the day goes on. Be ready to replenish it as needed. But otherwise, I don't' see one eight hour day being a big problem. 

     They do sell special scoops designed for the bottom of the fryer but they might be expensive for just one day of use. 
     
  5. popbox

    popbox

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    Hi!

    I think minimum 150 portions, maximum 200. 

    The meat will be dusted in corn flour mixture, then wet batter a mixture of flour, sweet potato flour and corn flour. 

    I tend to do the dry coat then let the meat dry out a bit (5-10 minutes) then dredge in wet batter and drop in fryer. I do let it swim for about 15 seconds but I find the bottom still sticks. It's fine when I'm doing small portions at home but I'd imagine I'd shoot myself if I was doing this in a market...

    Tiffany
     
  6. popbox

    popbox

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    I have a lot of problem with bits get stuck on the basket itself and then it burns which I think causes the oil to darken...

    Should I omit the basket and just drop it into the fryer? 

    I try to skim as much as I can but it's the parts that stuck on the basket itself that troubles me...

    I'm using rapeseed oil, what is considered a good oil? I think I can get gallons of rapeseed but not sure the other type of oil...
     
  7. popbox

    popbox

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    I will have quite a few gallons of oil on hand to replenish. I will look for that scoop! Is it a special name?
     
  8. chefross

    chefross

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    150 portions in an 8 hour period is nothing for French fryers.

    Most restaurants keep their fryers going from open to close.

    If the oil is clean and fresh, you should have no problem.

    As for the sticking, have you tried holding the piece of chicken in the oil for a moment or two before you drop it in?

    This forms a crust upon contact with the oil...then a few shakes during cooking might help insure less sticking.
     
  9. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    When it comes to frying nothing beats the flavor of peanut oil.
     
  10. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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           If you google "fryer cleaning scoop" you should get lots of links. There are some for sale on webstaurant.com for fifty dollars. You'll know it when you see it. A rectangular scoop with a long handle. You might find a used one somewhere. 

    There are also fine mesh square shaped skimmers to dip into the oil and get the bits you don't see floating. 

         If you do any frying on a daily basis, the bottom scoops are well worth the money. I used one when cleaning the fryer. They make scooping out the bottom much easier after the oil is drained. There are usually holes in the back of the scoop to allow oil to drain so you are just scooping bits. 

        My only frying suggestion is to keep the basket moving slightly as the chicken cooks to limit the time the chicken is in constant contact with the basket wires, at least for a  minute or two until the coating has a chance to solidify. The breading sticks when there is uninterrupted contact. 

          You can also have a good quality wire brush on hand to occasionally brush the basket clean of any stuck bits. Do this away from the fryer to eliminate the chance for any wires to break loose and get in the oil. A good quality wire brush shouldn't do that but better safe than sorry. 
     
  11. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Peanut oil is my choice for deep frying.

    It has a higher smoke point thus the oil lasts longer.

    But as someone already mentioned bring extra because you will lose some to the items being fried.

    You are having problems with the product sinking?

    Leave one basket in and and then "swim" the piece...place in basket and finish it off like that.

    mimi
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2015
  12. grande

    grande

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    Well, you have a double deep fryer, so, take the baskets out of one side, swim the chicken on that side, holding in the oil for a couple seconds, then use the fry scoop to shift everything to the baskets. Your fryer should hav3 a grate in the bottom, above the elements. If food stick to this grate, tapping lightly on the grate should release it.

    Make sure you have made provisions to take the hot oil out of the fryer and either filter it and save it or dispose of it. Not sure what the set up is there. Buy the fryer oil will need several hours to cool down, so plan on it being extremely hot when you need to deal with it.
     
  13. popbox

    popbox

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    That is such a great idea! I didn't think of that!

    You also brought up something I did not think about: how to dispose the oil. I have always waited for it to cool but obviously can't do that at the market...what would you suggest? I won't save it, I would dispose of it but what containers should/can I use to put the oil in?

    Thanks again! 
     
  14. grande

    grande

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    Too be honest, I'm not sure! At the restaurant we use big stock pots. But I don't know how far you're going to have to take it. You could buy a "fat-vat™", but then you're running into money. I would find other people that do markets in your area and ask.
    I also don't know where you're disposing the oil. The best i could think of is dumping at a nearby restaurants grease dumpster- with permission of course
     
  15. popbox

    popbox

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    I know where I can dispose the oil as we have a recycling center nearby that I go to dispose the oil I have now from cooking at home. Big stock pots are not a bad idea...so I guess it needs to be metal then...

    yes I will check with other market people! 

    Thank you for all of your help!
     
  16. mike9

    mike9

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    If you go with peanut oil you need to put a sign indicating such.  Anyone with a peanut allergy will suffer from the contamination.  We use to use vegetable shortening as I recall.  It came in blocks and we'd drain our fryers using big stock pots then clean and refill.  
     
  17. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    @Mike9  thanks for pointing out the allergy thing.

    I don't worry about it at home but when feeding the public it is certainly a huge issue.

    mimi
     
  18. ordo

    ordo

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  19. mike9

    mike9

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    Good to know, but I still wouldn't roll those dice - too much liability and a statement by "The Peanut Institute" might not be enough to get you off the hook.
     
    markrmoore2 likes this.
  20. ordo

    ordo

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    May be Mike. More info here:

    http://www.peanutallergy.com/lifestyle/peanut-allergy/how-does-refining-make-peanut-oil-safe

    Anyway, having tried both, refined and cold pressed peanut oils ( in a home kitchen environment) i would never cook with refined oil. You know, all the processing, additives, etc. It just tastes bad to me, while cold pressed oil is heaven.