How to get rid of "beef taste" in meat?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by sybil, May 5, 2017.

  1. sybil

    sybil

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    When I'm about to fry some meat, I usually just add salt and pepper to it. I then put a small amount of grapeseed oil in a pan, and I fry the meat turning it around every so often. I also might add some garlic to the pan or some rosemary. When the meat is done, I can certainly taste the salt and pepper, but the meat itself retains a "beef taste". In other words, it's got a stale taste to it, as if I didn't season it with anything at all. Is there a way to get rid of that beef taste?
     
  2. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Are you cooking it a lot or a just until rare?

    One of the things you can do is brine the meat first in a 10% solution of salt water.  That might help.

    I'm afraid though, beef tastes like beef, I know, silly right?  But why not focus on something else?
     
  3. maryb

    maryb

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    Lost me, if you don't want to taste beef don't cook beef... maybe try a different oil, olive oil pairs well with beef
     
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  4. sybil

    sybil

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    I usually cook it a lot. I'll try doing the brine. Thanks.
     
  5. sybil

    sybil

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    I'll give olive oil a try. Thanks.
     
  6. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    If your beef tastes stale then it might be poor quality beef, or poor quality stale ingredients.  I can't imagine anything having a beefier taste than beef.  Maybe the language is not translating well, where are you from?
     
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  7. sybil

    sybil

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    I called it a "beef taste" because I didn't know how to describe it. What I am referring to is the bland taste that meat has when it hasn't been seasoned with anything. In my case despite adding salt and pepper to it before frying, it still comes out with that bland taste.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2017
  8. french fries

    french fries

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    What cut of beef are you using? And where are you buying your beef from? 
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2017
  9. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    One way to get rid of that taste is to sub with pork, chicken, or firm tofu.
     
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  10. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I know exactly what you mean, there have been a few times when I bought meat from the grocery store and when I tasted it i just knew it came from a miserable animal living in a factory. Maybe try gettting beef from a reputable butcher, I promise you that even the cheaperst cut of meat should still taste like meat. But I would try to find another way to describe this taste, I can't imagine many things that are more delicious than "beef taste "
     
  11. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Are you getting a good caramelization on the meat? If not, possibly you are overcrowding the pan which will cause the meat to steam more than saute. If this is the case, the meat winds up being less interesting/bland in taste.
     
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  12. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    What color is it before you start?

    It is rare (hehe) but if it has been frozen and defrosted and then frozen again most of the blood will leech out and the flavor right with it.

    mimi
     
  13. someday

    someday

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    Personal pet peeve of mine, but the liquid that comes out of meat is not blood. There may be TRACE amounts of blood left behind in meat, but the liquid that comes out is basically a mixture of water and myoglobin, which is a protein that bonds with o2 and distributes it to the muscles (also gives muscles the red color). 

    Animals are bleed during the slaughter process and almost all the blood is pumped and/or drained out. If you ever have actual blood in or on your meat you'll know, because it is thick, black-ish, and quite distinct looking from the juice. This is usually rare (at least in the US) and indicates something went wrong with the slaughter. Usually this meat will never make it past QA checks at the slaughterhouse, though sometimes it does. Again, given how many animals we kill for food in this country, it is extremely rare. 

    Aside from that, what you said about the freezing/re-freezing process is accurate. To add to your point, the freezer can often impart "off" flavors as well to the meat if it is improperly wrapped or stored for a very long time. 

    Anyways, to the OP's question, it most likely has to do with the quality of beef you are buying, the cut, and how much you are cooking it. Grass fed beef tends to have a stronger flavor ("gamey") and might be what you are experiencing. This taste is exacerbated the more you cook it. 

    Odd question though...how to remove beef taste from beef. I feel like we are missing something. 
     
  14. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Thank you for that reminder. Too many people either forget or never knew.
     
  15. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Thanks for the FYI.... I am no stranger to butchering but no one ever thought to enlighten me and I always assumed.

    So what seeps from my steak is not blood....makes sense as it doesn't coagulate on the plate....duh.

    I gave the neighbor a pack of good home ground beef (prime sirloin and some nice chuck roasts) to make tacos.

    She called saying the flavor was crap.

    I asked her to walk me thru what she did.

    Steamed by adding water to the pan and covered.

    Cooked under low heat until no pink left and then rinsed whatever fat might remain off with hot water.

    I know...(she is cut off) never heard of it either.

    Asked what possessed her to commit such a crime and got this 'summer is almost here and I want to drop some lbs...saw this on Pinterest so tried it out".

    Doubt the OP did this but thought to share the ignorance of the shallow minded...

    mimi
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2017
  16. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    That's some neighbor...
     
  17. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Right?

    She prolly weighs 110 soaking wet.

    I wish I was that fat.

    My neighborhood does a lot of bartering and she makes some really great salsas and chutneys....

    mimi
     
  18. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    As far as losing weight goes, it would not enter my mind to do something like this.  She's just a person who knows not the first clue about cooking.  Want tacos? Sure, I'll boil some up for you haha.
     
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  19. bloodymary

    bloodymary

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    That is a loaded question. I agree it could easily be the quality/source of meat, but it could also be the heat temperature and cooking method.
    It is my opinion that cooking beef to a well done temperature, the meat is rendered flat/flavorless by that cooking process anyway, no matter what oil you use, or how well it was spiced, or brined.
     
  20. french fries

    french fries

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    Depending on what exactly you mean by "every so often", and how hot your pan is, you could be steaming your steak, rather than searing it, which means a bland taste instead of a great caramelized crust.