How to get into a good Culinary School?

Discussion in 'Choosing A Culinary School' started by terragon, Jul 2, 2013.

  1. terragon

    terragon

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    Alright so it's pretty much explained in the subject and sorry it is such a general question.

    Pretty much I 'm going to need financial help so that kind of hurts the chance of getting into a good one. I was wondering if you guys had any tips on getting into schools like the CIA, Le Cordon Bleu London or Paris. I'm moving to Athens, GA and figured I'd try to get some experience in a restaurant there or Atlanta. Any advice would be great because I am willing to do any amount of work to get in a good culinary school.
     
  2. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    Step One: Fill out your FAFSA: http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/
     

    Check with each school's Financial Aid office, there are numerous scholarships, grants, loans, etc., available. Be VERY careful concerning loans, remember, something like CIA, J&W, may cost in excess of $40k and that can be difficult to repay @6.8% interest on $10/hour
     
  3. terragon

    terragon

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    Yeah I'm a little scared of that. Not sure how to get into the whole industry with doing a nice paycheck so figured the best thing was work hard to get into a good school so I could get a good position. 
     
  4. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    Search the forums.

    School may be of value, but, in the opinion of many working in the trade, it is not the "end all" for getting hired nor for getting better pay. Industry experience pays a big part.

    Many schools, including I believe, CIA & J&W, REQUIRE at least 6 months experience in a commercial kitchen prior to being accepted into school. The average culinary workplace is far different from school conditions.

    Fill out your FAFSA. Get a job, even if it is as a dishwasher, in a restaurant, school kitchen, hotel, anything EXCEPT fast food chains, then apply to all the culinary schools you can.

    Take a long and hard look at your local community college(s) that offer culinary skills, they teach exactly the same fundamentals as any good private school and they are FAR less expensive, as much as a 90% discount.

    Most chefs care more about what you can do than where you learned to do it.
     
     
    kaiquekuisine likes this.
  5. Iceman

    Iceman

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    Join the military (the NAVY is the best).  Get fixed up on the GI-bill program.   You get quality education, continuous experience, free eats, free medical, no rent, utilities or other such bills.   After a simple single term you'll have all kinds of experience and more than enough $$$ to go anywhere you like.   If you're play you're cards right, you will have an opportunity for life-long employment.   It's a beautiful thing.  

    NO experience ... NO job.

    I could do that job ... But who'd give me the chance?

    Army ... NAVY ... Air Force ... Marines ...

    We don't ask for experience ... WE GIVE IT!!!

    You won't read it in a book ... YOU'll LIVE IT!!!

    Pick a service. Pick a challenge. SET YOURSELF APART!!!

    Army ... NAVY ... Air Force ... Marines ...

    WHAT A GREAT PLACE ... IT'S A GREAT PLACE TO START !!!

    1980 Armed Forces Recruiting Commercial - YouTube
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2013
  6. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Have a lot of money.. Get a job in a class place, you are better off and you get paid.
     
  7. kaiquekuisine

    kaiquekuisine

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    Yep agreed with Pete , luckily in my country we have culinary courses (short period ones that can teach the fundamentals )  that count in a resume. 
    You could always do what i did , and go searching for job and end up finding someone willing to teach you , i ended up finding a chef willing to teach me everything she knows. 

    She is a LCB graduate along with graduating in one of the finest culinary schools in brazil. So yeh i got lucky. 

    Nothing better then learn on the job and get paid for it. 

    Now what pete said is true , the real world kitchen is alot different then the ones in culinary school. ( the warped pans , the horrible handles , the rusty silver ware , and those horrible burners oh god ) but in no way does that mean you shouldnt work a bit to gain your experience. 

    Im pretty thankful i got to learn on the job , cuz if one day i actually decide to pay for school at least i know i wont be going there with no experience , without even being able to finely dice and onion XD 

    Also remember a school will give you basic techniques and terms , in no way will it teach you speed , and will qualify as work experience.

    That and a community college teaches you the basic fundementals like any other culinary school. 

    Most chefs care more about what you can do than where you learned to do it. ( couldnt have said it better myself ) 
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2013
    skipstrr likes this.
  8. terragon

    terragon

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    If that's the case then I got lucky with moving to Athens. Two of my favorite chefs are from that area and I'll see if I can get a job and possibly a mentor.