How to freeze a bernaise sauce?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by chefdianacortes, Jul 16, 2012.

  1. chefdianacortes

    chefdianacortes

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    Hello everyone!

    I really need help on this one! I would like to know if any of you has a bernaise sauce recipe that can be succesfully frozen to work with it in a restaurant, and serve it on top a grilled meat, just like some people do it with the flavorized butters.

    And if you can give me any advice on how to freeze it, for how long, etc.

    Thank you so much in advance!!!!

    Diana
     
  2. someday

    someday

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    Well, you can't really freeze a bernaise sauce and expect it to come back emulsified and viable to spoon over something, I wouldn't think.

    My suggestion would be to make a bernaise flavored compound butter and just serve that over the steak. Make a bernaise reduction, chop some tarragon, shallot, etc...then just mix into softened whole butter. Then roulade and slice into discs as needed. You'd be missing the eggs, obviously, but the flavor profile could be very similar. 

    I also don't understand why you would want to freeze bernaise sauce, since it is a warm emulsified butter sauce...?
     
  3. chefdianacortes

    chefdianacortes

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    Hi
    Thanks for replying in such a short time. It's a great idea the one of trying to do a bernaise butter instead of the sauce. We want to freeze it because the cooks we have in the restaurant are not able to manage doing these kind of sauces right before taking out the order....so I thought it would be easier to prepare them in advance and regenerate them before seeking them....but apparently it's a bad idea.

    I'm going to do what you told me and I'll let you know.

    Thanks again.
     
  4. fluffybuns9

    fluffybuns9

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    Agreed. You really want to stay away from freezing bearnaise. It basically defeats its whole purpose. The idea of bearnaise is to be fresh daily, and held no more than a couple hours. Making a compound herb butter (tarragon reduction) is your best bet.
     
     
  5. chefboy2160

    chefboy2160

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    Yes indeed +1. This would be the way to go.......................
     
  6. adamm

    adamm

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    Iv made it with 2 parts creme fraice 1 part egg yolk and make just like a normal holandaise or bernaise.   After its made you can cool it down in a refrigerater to use later and almost heat to order if your cooks are semi decent.  Iv used this for partys and its better than the canned crap but doest break as easy as regular bernaise.  Good luck.
     
  7. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Bernaise is not made with creme fraiche.  Whatever that was, and no matter how wonderful, it wasn't sauce Bernaise.  A compound butter flavored with Bernaise elements could be okay, but it isn't sauce Bernaise either.  "Bernaise" is pretty specific terminology; I wouldn't screw around with your customers' expectations too much.

    You can hold Bernaise pretty well in a thermos -- couple of hours easy.  That way, you can get an entire service out of one or two batches. Oh, and hire better cooks.

    BDL
     
  8. chefdianacortes

    chefdianacortes

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    Okay thank you!!! i´ll try both to see which one works for me...
     
  9. chefdianacortes

    chefdianacortes

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    Yes, i agree with you that it wouldn´t be a bernaise sauce and maybe clients would feel robbed. Perhaps i´ll say it´s a Bernaise Butter if that one works or change the name on the creamy one.

    About hiring better cooks i´ve thought about it but unfortunately i am giving this restaurant an assessment and it is located in a town where there are few people who know about professional cooking! 

    Thank you for your advice!
     
  10. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Make a bernaise semifreddo (without sugar of course), freeze, cut into stick butter size, refreeze, pull and cut portions to order.
     
  11. chefdianacortes

    chefdianacortes

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    Hi...could you please explain me the step by step or the recipe for this bernaise semifreddo?

    Thank you
     
  12. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    1 cup white wine

    1 cup tarragon vinegar

    4 tablespoons chopped shallot

    1 ounce chopped tarragon

    1/2 ounce chopped chervil

    1/4 ounce crushed black peppercorns

    combine the above and reduce by 2/3, cool, add

    6 egg yolks

    whip in a double boiler until very thick, it will turn lighter in color and double in volume, strain through etamine, fold in

    3 cups of manufacturing cream whipped to soft peaks

    1 tablespoon chopped tarragon

    1/2 tablespoon chopped chervil

    freeze
     
  13. michaelga

    michaelga

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    Chef Layne,

    That is a pretty cool idea.

    Can  you confirm / clarify the following (English is not my first language... sorry for the trouble)
    1) first high-light; what shape or type of container do you freeze this in initially?  I'm guessing a loaf pan?

    2) second high-light; did you mean a tamis? or Étamine (tissu) basically a layered cheese cloth?

    3) third high-light; 40% or more milk fat?

    Thanks a bunch.

    This looks to be something very useful.
     
  14. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Last edited: Jul 18, 2012
  15. Iceman

    Iceman

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    OK. I don't get the popularity of this topic lately. I'm curious here. Just how many dishes do you make that come w/ béarnaise sauce? ... and how much calling do you have for those dishes? I can see eggs-b, yucky potatoes and once in a while, some jamoak will want it on his steak. That's it for me. I must be a sheltered dinosaur. 
     
  16. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Why whip the cream?  That makes no sense. 

    There may be cream in a Bearnaise semifreddo, but not in sauce Bearnaise -- whipped or otherwise.  Call it what you will, but the recipe is for frozen custard. 

    ChefLayne:

    I hate to be tough on new ideas, and certainly haven't even tried your idea or anything like it -- which may disqualify the opinion -- and please forgive me for being so blunt, pessimistic, and dubious. 

    The recipe doesn't sound good to me for any purpose.  Do your diners really melt a scoop of frozen custard (with plenty of cream) on top of a hot protein? Really?  Steak a la mode?!  Is it a popular dish?  How much do you charge?

    I suppose you could heat a little of the frozen base in a microwave, in the same way home cooks in a hurry make a creme anglaise by melting French Vanilla ice cream, but considering what's in this recipe, it doesn't sound like a good idea to me.  I think it would be overly liquid, overly airy (if you'd beaten the cream) and lack the intense butter/egg/acid richness you get from a Bearnaise because it was destroyed by all that cream. 

    MichaelGA:

    Go ahead and make a test batch if you have the time -- what can it hurt?  Don't expect too much, and do get back to us to let it know how it worked for you. 

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2012
  17. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    I'm with BDL on this, just sounds wrong........To the OP, either make the sauce or find something else. The compound butter is your best bet.
     
  18. grillbeast

    grillbeast

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    Why not make the sauce just before service and hold it warm?  Any time we've run a special with a hollandaise based sauce that's exactly what we've done with perfect results.
     
  19. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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  20. Iceman

    Iceman

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    WOW.