How to deal with the b.s in the kitchen

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by joshthacook, Mar 11, 2014.

  1. joshthacook

    joshthacook

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    Just Graduated From Culinary School
    I'm a culinary school graduate just getting into the industry, been working at red lobster for 2 months and all ready it's a lot of bullshxt with management,chaos in the kitchen I'm working prep right now so it's a lot of b.s for us.. I just want to kno how do I keep calm and focused in the kitchen until I get out of chain restaurants? N as a graduate and about 6 months with real restaurant experience will it be easier to move on to hotels and upscale spots with
     
  2. youngchefkarl

    youngchefkarl

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    I'm just curious as to why you're working at red lobster if you're in Philly AND a culinary graduate. I would get out of there as soon as possible and find new employment. Philly has a great food scene and I am sure you'll find something. You may find less stress working at a reputable place, and you'll learn new techniques. 
     
  3. chef torrie

    chef torrie

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    Never bash somebody's job or position. We all start out somewhere, and not all in the same places. He doesn't plan on being a red lobster lifer, and though he may not be learning a bunch about fine dining, there are good things you can learn in a corporate position.
     
  4. acidlinktest

    acidlinktest

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    I agree with youngchefkarl, I would try get out asap. Not bashing it, but I think there would be far better things for a culinary school graduate than a place like that. I was lucky enough to get a good place straight up (pure luck) and I am just a S*** kicker haha, a graduate would be welcome in better places I would think
     
  5. chef torrie

    chef torrie

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    True, but learning the functionalities of how a corporate kitchen works before you venture out into a more upscale joint isn't a bad idea. Learning how to turn and burn 800-1000 covers in a day no matter what your making is a skill that's always nice to have. Now combine knowledge/technique you've learned in school, your ability to toss pans on a 800 cover night, and the by the book ways of a corporation to a better place in a year or so, I wouldn't mind that resume for a young guy. More so then a fresh grad who's never worked a busy line in his life who think they know everything
     
  6. acidlinktest

    acidlinktest

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    This is true, not such a bad thing haha
     
  7. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Don't think that life will get tons better, or the BS will stop by moving out of the chain restaurants.  All places have their fair share of BS, the type of BS just changes.  And since you don't tell us what the BS is we really can't tell you much about whether it will get better or not.
     
    acidlinktest likes this.
  8. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    Yeah and I'm beginning to feel the only true way to avoid that BS, in almost any job,

    is to have your own business--which isn't without its BS neither, but at least it's BS

    thats ultimately owned by you.
     
  9. pollopicu

    pollopicu

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    I agree with young and acid. People don't usually spend thousands in culinary school to work at Red Lobster. I'm not putting it down either. I think RL is a great job for someone walking in off the street who wants a taste of what it's like to work in professional kitchen environment before taking the plunge into the industry and committing to costly student loans. I just can't wrap my mind around why would someone who went through the entire process of culinary school would settle for restaurant chain, unless it was nerves, and they were trying to gain kitchen confidence. which is understandable. It's an intimidating industry.. Is there a special reason you did so?

    Philly is one of the best culinary scenes out there. I was practically almost living there myself at one time in Center City, and the food everywhere is amazing. I'd so totally take advantage of that.
     
  10. rdm magic

    rdm magic

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    I worked in a 500 cover a night restaurant as my first real job in a kitchen. Now I work in a starred restaurant, and I can cook the other guys under the table. Stick with a busy place, because you can learn to cook quality, if you already know how to handle the pressure. Having all the quality but crumbling when you have 3 tables away is worthless.

    As for the BS? Rise above it. You're a prep chef, you have no responsibility. If something goes wrong, its someone elses fault. You don't get paid enough to worry about the BS. It's someone elses job to worry about it.
     
  11. chef torrie

    chef torrie

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