How to cut up primal cuts

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by scott livesey, Dec 21, 2016.

  1. scott livesey

    scott livesey

    Messages:
    352
    Likes Received:
    87
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Locally the price of meat is high.  What used to be cheap cuts, like a chuck roast, are over $4 a pound.  Pork is no better with boneless loin chops over $3 a pound.  I can get large primal cuts like whole pork loin for $1.50/lb or beef top sirloin for $3/lb.  looking for a guide on how to cut these up.  currently I just slice about an inch thick then package in one pound portions.  I know I am misfiring with the beef top sirloin as some steaks will be half chewy and half melt in your mouth tender.  would prefer a book as cutting up a 10lb piece of pork shoulder in my lap while watching a you-tube video is not practical.

    thanks,

    scott
     
  2. brianshaw

    brianshaw

    Messages:
    2,992
    Likes Received:
    291
    Exp:
    Former Chef
    I often do stuff like that, more pork than beef though. Order a pork side and pay little and cut a lot. It's time consuming but satisfying. Not sure if I'm really saving money in the end but I get the cuts as I desires so I've done this many times. Decent knife and bone saw is all one really needs. Plus a lot of Saran Wrap and tin foil! Lots of books out there if you search. My favorite is Ryan Farr's Whole Beast Butchery. Both pictures and description on beef, pork, and lamb. Some recipes too. That's the book I bought but many looked both good and useful. Enjoy!
     
  3. brianshaw

    brianshaw

    Messages:
    2,992
    Likes Received:
    291
    Exp:
    Former Chef
    P.S. Sometimes to get the cuts you want you'll need to buy a bigger piece than, say, the pork shoulder or whole brisket that can be found at the discount food warehouse. i think technically those are often even smaller than what's considered sub-primal. But I hope there's a real butcher on he site to provide greater clarity.
     
  4. jimyra

    jimyra

    Messages:
    891
    Likes Received:
    164
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
  5. scott livesey

    scott livesey

    Messages:
    352
    Likes Received:
    87
    Exp:
    At home cook
    thank you.  we are getting large pieces then that are cryovaced.  top sirloin usually 10-15 pounds.  pork loin 8-15 pounds.
     
  6. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,740
    Likes Received:
    343
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    There are two muscles to the top sirloin.  One right under the fat cap is also called the rump cap.   This is the more tender part.  The rump camp you cook whole with the fat cap on or slightly trimmed.  The other just try and cut it 1.25" thick for grilling or roast whole to med rare.
     
    scott livesey likes this.
  7. butzy

    butzy

    Messages:
    1,642
    Likes Received:
    326
    Exp:
    Owner/Operator
    I know you said you prefer a book, but I found this video quite interesting (pig butchery)

     
  8. millionsknives

    millionsknives

    Messages:
    2,424
    Likes Received:
    367
    Exp:
    Professional Caterer
    No bacon no ribs huh? Not how I would have done it, but everyone has different priorities
     
  9. mike9

    mike9

    Messages:
    2,404
    Likes Received:
    338
    Exp:
    Former Chef
    I'm a big fan of Scott's and subscribe to his youtube channel.  My son and I butchered a deer the other day and we take out time and get everything we can off an animal.  It's respectful to the animal and is also frugal use of the product.  
     
  10. scott livesey

    scott livesey

    Messages:
    352
    Likes Received:
    87
    Exp:
    At home cook
    bacon is available commercially packed.  ribs don't make sense.  $1.39/lb for boneless pork sirloin or $2.25/lb for ribs that are over 50% bone and waste.