How old is too old for LANG? And how do you know?

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by bakedaddy, Dec 26, 2014.

  1. bakedaddy

    bakedaddy

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    Hi guys, I'm new to the forums and I was hoping I might luck up and get a hand with some advice from some chefs that have experience with them. 

    I'm running a little at home Bakery catering business in Thailand that's picking up quite nicely and I'm looking at expanding to a retail outlet. But I'm going  to need a decent oven. I have some experience with LANG when I did some franchise training last year. The franchise didn't pan out but I liked the oven.

    I found this used   BHS-C for sale and I'm not sure what I should ask for it. And the fact that it's analog raises more questions as the new ones are digital.

    http://bangkok.craigslist.co.th/app/4814364313.html

    So I guess what I'm asking is, how old is too old for a Lang oven, how can I tell how old it is, and what problem signs should I look for when checking it out?

    If I could get a lil vision on this I would be super grateful.

    Thanks,

    Oh and BTW, 50,000THB is around $1,560USD
     
  2. foodpump

    foodpump

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    I dunno..... with craigslist you don't get a warranty.

    It's hard to say what kind of shape it's in.

    Firstly analog controls are desirable in that they are much more robust than electronic mother boards or controls--and much cheaper to replace if/when they do burn out.

    Hard to say how far gone the electric heating elements are.  These will burn out eventually and need to be replaced.

    Hard to say how far gone the insulation in the cabinet is.  It doesn't make sense to re-fit new insulation in an old cabinet.

    Hard to say how old the wiring is.  Again, if the wiring is old/brittle it doesn't make sense to replace it.

    Hard to say how old the electric fan is.  Costly to replace, but do-able if the unit is under 3-4 years old.
     
  3. bakedaddy

    bakedaddy

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    Thanks, is there product ID on the oven that would let me know how old it is?
     
  4. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Yes, the serial number should give you the year and possibly date it was built.  It's usually on the back of the unit.

    The question is, how has it been treated for the years in operation?  It could have been running--night and day-- for two years straight, or it could have sat unused for 5 years in a corner.

    If you have a "main" oven, then buying this one isn't so much of a risk.  But if you don't have another oven and this one craps out on you, or costs you lots of money in repairs, then it's a lousy risk. 
     
  5. rsi rich

    rsi rich

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    Hi,

    Call and get the serial number.  Once you get the serial number, call Lang tech support and ask them to look up the service history and sale or build date.  That will give you an idea of the service history and age of the oven.

    Buying used analog equipent is much safer than buying used digital equipment.  There are much fewer things that can break down.  Generally, if the oven heats up, then the only things that would really go bad are the doors and the thermostats.  From a US perspective, the price seems bit steep considering it is a used half size oven and we can find new full size electric convection ovens in the $2500-2800 range (shipping included within US).