How many hours does a apprentice chef work a day/week

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by newchef101, Feb 25, 2012.

  1. newchef101

    newchef101

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    And do i have to go to tafe at all? and how much do i earn? sorry for putting this in wrong thread i can't find new chef thread :D
     
  2. lifeapprentice

    lifeapprentice

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    Culinary Student
    This all depends on your employer. I'm assuming by your reference to TAFE that you're Aussie?

    The restaurant I just left had me working about 115-125 hours a fortnight/ 5 days a week sometimes 6 days during summer and had me with an apprenticeship program called AVTES (which i dont recommend). AVTES is basically, you get a text book called Professional Chef, a workbook filled with chapters of questions and you pretty much read the text book and fill out the questions and every month or so someone from AVTES will come by your restaurant and check that you're up to date with your workbook and more or less quiz you about the chapter that you've just done. Basically, you teach yourself. Other than the obvious lack of guidance and teaching, after working 14 hours the last thing you want to do when you get home is crack open a text book and fill out questions (especially if you have to be back at work in 9 hours)

    The restaurant I'm with now allowed me to chose my own apprenticeship program. I picked a culinary school in Melbourne (where I'm from) called William Angliss. I work 4 days a week and 1 day a week I attend William Angliss which is more like a formal school where I sit in a class room with other apprentices and have an actual teacher teaching theory for half the day and then we're in the kitchen doing practical stuff for the other half of the day learning basics like stocks, sauces, knife skills, different techniques etc... I also get paid for attending class unlike AVTES.

    Hope this answers your question, even though I kinda focused more on the TAFE side of things.

    Short answer, depends on your employer but average 100-130 hours a fortnight during summer, less during winter. Oh, and say bye to weekends. Mondays to Wednesdays will now be your weekends. Welcome to the LIFE.
     
  3. foodpump

    foodpump

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    When I did my apprenticeship, a 3 yr contract, it was 81/2 hrs a day, 4 days, one day of school per week.

    Mind you that was from 85-88, and apprentices called themselves aqpprentice cooks., there was only one Chef in the building, an he let you know it. 
     
  4. chefedb

    chefedb

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    I did mine both in France at the Hotel Negresco in Monte Carlo in the late 60s. I started in the pastry shop and then did every station. Everything was scratch nothing came butchered or premade. I received room and board and what they called a pittence in those days I worked from 8am to 2pm  then 5pm to about 8.30 pm  so about 9 hours or so a day 6 days but had to be available if private function on my day off or someone called sick. Was it worth it YOU BET IT WAS. I worked with and met  the best of them Came back to NY and breezed through apprenticship in hotels here, and was hired right then and there as Chef Potage in a classy NY hotel and on from there.
     
  5. newchef101

    newchef101

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    Thank you that actually helped a lot. I'm just wondering what will I be doing on my first year? Do i cook on my first year?

    and my Boss said that i will be working from 10am to 3pm 5 days a week. then he said when it's busy i go back and work from 5pm to whatever. I also go to tafe one day a week. so what will i be doing chopping? taking orders taking out the rubbish etc
     
  6. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Keep a pad and pencil always in your pocket so you can jot down little tidbits as you see or hear them. Eyes open and always ask why we do this, thats the way you learn.
     
  7. lifeapprentice

    lifeapprentice

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    You'll probably start out on larder which is salads, sides for the mains and entres. I started out on hot/cold larder which includes the toaster and fryer and desserts. I also had to jump in on dishes from time to time, sweep the kitchen, empty the bins, prep, portioning and wrapping stuff up. Don't be pissed if you find yourself doing alot of dirty work, prove yourself during service and you'll gain more responsibilities. It's all part of being an apprentice and learning how a kitchen works from the bottom up.

    Speaking of which I just had my last shift at my first restaurant and now i have a week off before I start at my new place! I kinda don't want that week off, I just wanna get straight into it!
     
  8. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Thats the right way to learn it  All facets from the bottom up  Congratulations and good luck to you
     
  9. chefhow

    chefhow

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    When I did mine in 90-93 I had a 3yr contract, worked 4 days in the kitchen for 9-11 hrs a day and 1 school day.  Made minimum wage and worked my way thru the resort starting in the stock kitchen as a prep person.  When I was done I was working dinner service on the hot line and able to do anything in the resort.  I worked in every kitchen department including the butcher shop, the pastry shop, bakery and did overnight room service for a month.