How do you think about the electronic kitchen appliances?

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Joined Oct 10, 2005
Yeah, I hear you, e-books may be great to compress storage space, but.....

But the downside is that current e-book technology will be obsolete in 10 years or less.

My parents were one of the first to record their wedding on Super -8 film.

My brother recorded his wedding on VHS

Both technologies are obsolete now, all within 50 years or less.

In order to preserve the content of books, the old electronic technology of storing this information has to be updated with each new generation of devices, and many times this means going back to the original paper and ink for that information.

Another way of looking at it:

Trees are a renewable resource, and you can make several books with one tree. 

Electronic devices are made with metals, plastics, and other elements that are not renewable.  True they can be re-cycled, but at great expense.

I'm a crochety old fart, my entire life I've owned maybe 5 computers.  How many computers does the average 30-someting go through in a 10 year period? 

I have not yet purchased--or even used a cell phone or smart device.  How many devices has the average 30-somethhing already gone through?

Everything with a power cord eventually ends up in the landfill......
 

phatch

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Ebooks are zipped xhtml (epubs at least though they can encapsulate some other formats too). The other formats are similarly tagged text. The text file has been fairly consistent all the years in the computer world. It is fairly trivial to upconvert the format or remain backwards compatbile with the existing format. I'm not too worried about the file obselesence. Convergence into other electronics was obvious from the start, at least to me. But then I've been reading e-books since the first Palm Pilot. Hardware obselescence, sure. 

Calibre can free your e-book library. 
 
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Joined Aug 28, 2011
For me it's a food processor,a blender, a 1970s oyster Imperial handheld eggbeater, an electric chicken plucker, And a radio in the kitchen , while I work and whirl . My coffee grinder (mill) is from 1950s Germany by far the most beautiful thing I have and use. And I french press my way to satisfaction. Another electrical appliance is an old west bend hot air popcorn Popper to roast the coffee . Electrical appliances are very helpful. But the mechanical manual ones take up much less room in the kitchen and never or rarely break. I used to have an electric can opener and now I use a small high-quality handheld one that hasn't quit yet . The electric one lasted three years ,and then it was in the garbage. Oh and also electric lighting is very useful To see what you are doing.
 
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Joined Sep 26, 2012
 
Ebooks are zipped xhtml (epubs at least though they can encapsulate some other formats too). The other formats are similarly tagged text. The text file has been fairly consistent all the years in the computer world. It is fairly trivial to upconvert the format or remain backwards compatbile with the existing format. I'm not too worried about the file obselesence. Convergence into other electronics was obvious from the start, at least to me. But then I've been reading e-books since the first Palm Pilot. Hardware obselescence, sure. 

Calibre can free your e-book library. 
Just wanted to say that, too. Calibre is the way to go - my ebooks won't go obsolete on me - they are DRM-stripped and convertible to any format I wish to use. Also, speaking as a 30-something here, the last time I bought a computer is about 12 years ago. I update piece by piece to keep the bastard running. No sense in buying a complete machine when the occasional mainboard+CPU transplant does the trick.
 
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Joined Jan 8, 2010
I don't have any electronic equipment in my kitchen, but a fair bit of electrical stuff .
A small oven, toaster, stick blender, kitchen machine, coffee grinder and meat grinder are all used on a regular base, but I can do without. I have a pestle and mortar, gas stove and oven and a collection of sharp knives, which I sharpen on stone, so could do all tasks without power. Handy around here as we do have the odd powercut (I live next to my lodge, so can use the manual meat grinder if needs be, but the electric one is so much easier).
I couldn't do without my fridges and freezers though, and some music while cooking is a definite plus!

As for e-books, I use a kindle. Fine for most books, but I do prefer cookbooks in print. Space is an issue though, as is availability. I back up most of the cookbooks and other interesting books to pdf file. That way I can print out a specific recipe if I want and I don't think pdf files will go obsolete in the near future.
 
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What exactly do you guys mean by the electric/electronic distinction, anyway? Electronic as in microcontroller-driven, programmable? Because otherwise, you won't find anything non-electronic these days, every electric motor with controllable speed will come with a solid-state electronic package attached.

Electronics are fine. Nice tools - as usual, you get what you pay for and good quality stuff doesn't go down the drain after a year. Then again, I have all the manual tools, too - and if the grid conks out, I can heat my house by wood, even feeding the heat into the hot-water circuit. Then again, if the grid conks out, I still have 10 kW of solar on the roof :)
 
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Joined Jan 8, 2010
Yeah, suppose for me the difference is micro-processor driven for electronics and everything that just runs on electricity with just an on off switch is electrics.

Forgot in my post aboce: the one thing that I couldn't deal with was my el-cheapo rice cooker. My dad and brother swear by it, but I think the rice that I cook just on the stove comes out better and fluffier
 
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Joined Aug 22, 2014
I couldn't live without my FP or my stick blender.

The electric knife has it's uses.
Like when slicing turkey breast and I don't want to mangle or compromise the skin.
Good point on the electric knife but still think it is a gadget that takes up room. Love my stick blender though (bamix), and it doubles as a food processor too.
 
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Joined Aug 22, 2014
 
Wife doesn't drink coffee and i only drink espresso out of home. That's really a dedicated grinder!

Whats interesting is how many electric appliances we have that we don't use at all. I can name 3: the juicer, the steamer and the soy milk maker.
I have a juicer and use it a lot. So for me it is a must have.
 
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Joined Feb 8, 2017
I prefer to do most home kitchen work by hand and try not to buy electric appliances until I absolutely need them. Working in a restaurant is a nice perk since I can hold out for good quality at home equipment and see who the real workhorses are. Currently I'm saving up for a Vitamix blender.

My cuisinart 200 w immersion blender is nice for small batch purées and bisques, whereas the cuisinart 3 cup food chopper gets a lot of use making sauces and other dinner prep. It gets the work done quick, and with just enough volume.

Krupps coffee grinder - used exclusively for grinding larger quantities of spices (any recommendations for a removable cup that doesn't spill stuff everywhere when you open it?)

Electric kettle and digital scale - use almost daily for coffee beans and sometimes baking. The coffee mill is hand crank and I use a Bodum French press.

Mortar and pestle - used for smaller quantities of spices, and making guac, pastes, etc.
 

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