How do you make sourdough bread?

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How do you make sourdough bread?

Do you follow Reinhart's method of doing a seed culture, then barm?

If so, where do you get the dark rye, whole rye flour?

TIA
 

phatch

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The book Classic Sourdoughs is the best I've seen though I'm not deeply read nor experienced on the topic. They have a site with lots of different cultures from around the world you can try out and recipes those cultures are traditionally used in.

http://www.sourdo.com/culture.htm

For a while, I had some of his San Fran culture, but maintaining it became too much hassle as I'm not a heavy sourdough baker. It would languish in the back of the fridge and produce hooch. He gives instructions on cleaning up such issues which I did a few times, but it's just too much hassle for me overall. Now, I go borrow some starter from my neighbor who keeps his starter happy like it was a religion. I still have to think a few days ahead to bulld it up enough, but it's much more practical for me to borrow than to maintain.
 
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I maintain my starter, it is currently about 23 years old and thriving.BTW, though it IS possible to purchase a specific starter, i.e. San Francisco, IF you maintain your starter for any length of time, it will begin to change and adapt to where it is maintained.
 
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I maintain my starter, it is currently about 23 years old and thriving. BTW, though it IS possible to purchase a specific starter, i.e. San Francisco, IF you maintain your starter for any length of time, it will begin to change and adapt to where it is maintained.

WOW 23 years old......I thought mine was old at 17 years....mine was given to my boss by a French Chef who made his from grapes.
 
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In addition to everyone else's good advice, I'd like to point out that while you can start a starter (mother) by feeding a poolish for a week or so, or in one of several other ways which ultimately rely on one local lactobacillus or another and yeast spores which were either in the flour or local and wild, it's not a reliable way to get a really good mother going.

It pains me to say it because I'm such a huge fan of his, but for those reasons Reinhart's advice is not the best.  Particular flour blends may work getting a "wild" starter to take off, but any sturdy flour will do.  And the frequently used cluster of graps or other fruit may or not be helpful, but it isn't actually necessary. 

Moral of the story:  If you're looking for a one stop shop for instructions, advice, history, recipes and a really great culture, you can't beat Carl's Friends -- where, by the way, everything is free. 

BDL
 
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Originally Posted by abefroman  
Did you say free?  As in free free?
Free as in free free, plus two envelopes, postage and wear and tear on a pencil.  You mail them an SASE, and they'll send you enough dried culture to get you going.  But why ask here?  Take a look at the site, where all will be answered.  Last time I'm going to post the link. 

You're on your own,

BDL
 
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Originally Posted by abefroman  

Free as in free free, plus two envelopes, postage and wear and tear on a pencil.  You mail them an SASE, and they'll send you enough dried culture to get you going.  But why ask here?  Take a look at the site, where all will be answered.  Last time I'm going to post the link. 

You're on your own,

BDL
Bookmarked, thanks!
 
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Great site BDL.

First one was slow time a'comin, and as I am not dilligent with the care and feeding, the 2 since then have been even slower.

Maybe I should use my neighbor's address next time.

Since switching the reminder to my phone (the string kept falling off my finger) this amazingly tart starter is aliveandwell for over 18 months.

I like the SASE bit.

mimi
 

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