How do you make boneless thin Porkchops tender & juicy/flavorful

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I'm having a problem here, I can't make thin porkchops without the bone tender or juicy. The flavor is always out the outside never on the inside, and it's not nearly as tender as I've seen others make it. So what's the problem here?

This is my method.

*Put tin foil on a pan, put westure sauce, steak sauce, and water in.

*Add salt + pepper.

*Place tin foil ontop to steam the porkchops.

*Place in oven for 30 minutes at 350. Flipping them at 15 minutes.

What am I doing wrong?
 
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Not enough water, too little time.

Try placing the pork chops on a wire rack, in a large bucket full of water. Pour sauce over it along with about 1/2 Gal Canola oil. Place in fire overnight. Rinse thoroughly and let dry in a slow oven for 3mn and 30 seconds. Rub with ketchup, add garlic and place sink in fresh water overnight in the fridge oven top stove chill microwave freezer. Pour tin foil, sprinkle with chopsticks, and serve with no sugar.
 
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phatch

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French Fries comments aside, where did you get this recipe?

Thin cutlets are usually poorly suited to wet cooking methods. Rather pan sear quickly and maybe brush with a sauce.
 
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I've known enough people trying to learn to cook that this would be a totally legit question and not a troll
 
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French Fries comments aside, where did you get this recipe?

Thin cutlets are usually poorly suited to wet cooking methods. Rather pan sear quickly and maybe brush with a sauce.
Um here's what I was thinking. The liquid prevents the pork chops from sticking. The Tin foil on top helps steam the pork chops to cook them even more.

I like the taste of worcester sauce and steak sauce so I add water to thin out the mixture.

My uncle told me I need to cook the pork chops a lot longer. He's made them before and they have flavor in the middle, and they're very tender. I'm guessing he does exactly what I do (idk what kind of sauce he uses but he does put liquid in) but he cooks his for 2 hours he said. He also said to use more liquid as well, for longer cook time.

I'm going shopping tomorrow and I'll try it out, if you got any suggestions please let me know. I like spicy / tangy stuff if you got any ideas for better ingredients/liquid sauce.

Edit: Also when my uncle makes the pork chops, idk what he uses but they always have a slimmy texture, and you can literally peel a layer of it off the porkchop. I think he's using butter idk, but it doesn't taste good so I didn't bother asking him about it. He just knows how to make the pork chops tender, I guess I just need to cook them longer, hopefully that adds more flavor in the middle.

Edit2: Whats wrong with wet cooking methods for thin pork chops? It seems more convenient to me, cook all the pork chops at once and with minimal work in the oven. I've never heard of searing a pork chop, but I have cooked them on a pan before but they came out with no flavor, very dry, and tough.
 
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I'll break down and buy thin cuts of meat when the price is really good but I've found I have to abandon the sear.  It just overcooks them all the time.  Sear is just flavor anyway and you can add flavor in a million ways, imho.  I love them slowly cooked in sauerkraut and seasonings.
 
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Brine is fine - and a quick sear.  Get a good instant read thermometer.  It's OK if they are a little pink inside.
 
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Brine is fine - and a quick sear.  Get a good instant read thermometer.  It's OK if they are a little pink inside.
Could I sous vide my pork chops? Or should I just stick to cooking them in the oven with lots of sauce/liquid?

If so, do you sear pork chops after sous viding them?  What is the ideal way to cook pork chops for maximized tenderness and flavor? 

Should I be cooking at high temps for short periods of time? Or cooking at low temps for long periods of time? Also is there certain levels of doneness in pork as with steak? Like a medium well done pork chop I guess?
 
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I make thin boneless loin chops all the time and have found a method that works for me best. It takes a little skill beyond what it appears you have but it is by no means difficult. I don't steam meat and there are cuts of pork much better suited for braising so I prefer to seat in a pan and then make a pan sauce.

First I pat the chops thoroughly dry and season with salt and pepper. In a pan large enough to hold the chops (should not touch each other) I put a little oil and when it's good and hot I put the chops in on very high heat and seat on each side and then remove them. Set aside. They'll be still raw in the middle. In the pan now I add onions garlic or whatever you like, herbs etc, then deglaze with wine or stock or both. Reduce the sauce and add the chops back in to continue cooking about a minute or two. Remove the chops again, keep stirring the sauce and add a knob of butter. Strain the sauce and pour it over the chops.
 
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I figure this is not so much a boneless chop as a loin sliced thin.

The kids like them done ala chicken/steak finger style ( season..flour....tenderize...egg wash...seasoned flour and let sit on wire rack for all the preceding to dry) fry until golden.
Serve with hand cut fries and cream gravy.

Makes darned good country style smothered chops as well.
The kind with bell peppers and onions in the smothering gravy.
Serve with hot buttered rice.

Feeling my country girl roots today.....
@laurenlulu might drop by with a good Louisiana back woods dish .... that is if she isn't too busy being on her honeymoon .....:eek:

mimi
 
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season with slaty stuff after searing, salt will draw out the juice. bone in keeps it juicier. but u dont want that. try marinating in wine
 
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I did it :)

My porkchops came out a lot more tender than last time. I added a lot of liquid (beer) and cooked on 450 for 30 minutes.

I'm guessing just a tad bit longer and they'll come out even better.
 
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450 degrees for 30 minutes?  Seriously?

How about pan fried in a bit of oil over medium heat for maybe 2 - 3 minutes per side?  Seems to me the reason your chops are coming out tough is because you are

cooking them WAY too long.

mjb.
 
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I did it :)

My porkchops came out a lot more tender than last time. I added a lot of liquid (beer) and cooked on 450 for 30 minutes.


I'm guessing just a tad bit longer and they'll come out even better.
If you're trying to do what your uncle does, cooking for a LONG time, the crucial point is not to let the liquid boil. In most ovens, that means you're going to want to set it around 325 or so. Bring the liquid to a gentle boil, put the chops in, cover the pot, and put the whole thing in the oven (preheated). That's a braise, and you cook it for about an hour or so. Check once after 10-15 minutes to be sure the liquid is at a bare simmer and you're good to go.

Alternatively, marinate overnight, wipe dry, dust with flour if you wish, then cook it very fast and let the inside remain slightly pink. (Bear in mind that trichinosis has been eliminated from the US herd, so unless you're buying pork from that weird guy around the back or something, you can undercook safely.) Different taste and texture, still tender.

What you're doing is neither fish nor fowl, as it were, and you're ending up with overcooked pork.
 
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