How do you Hummus?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by koukouvagia, Jan 19, 2012.

  1. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

    Messages:
    7,279
    Likes Received:
    531
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    What's your take on hummus?  How do you make it?  What do you add?
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,421
    Likes Received:
    437
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    I usually take the shortcut of using canned chickpeas, drained and rinsed.  From there, I'm pretty pure, adding garlic, olive oil, tahini, lemon juice, salt and a little hot sauce so I don't need to use as much salt.

    Sometimes I'll add some roasted peppers. Or olives.
     
  3. cheflayne

    cheflayne

    Messages:
    4,103
    Likes Received:
    474
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    When I do a traditional style, I pretty much do the same as phatch except that I use cayenne instead of hot sauce and additionally I add cumin. For a non traditional take, I make a date hummus.
     
  4. durangojo

    durangojo

    Messages:
    2,171
    Likes Received:
    89
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    yeah kk, what they said plus i add parsley....

    sometimes i make a black bean hummus too in which i add some chipotles in adobo and cumin...sometimes i make it with white beans instead of chick peas, but then it's probaly not called hummus then either!

    joey
     
  5. french fries

    french fries

    Messages:
    5,170
    Likes Received:
    302
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Never been really adventurous with my hummus, I just like to use dried chick peas, soak overnight and cook in the pressure cooker, and process for enough time so it is as smooth as possible (the Lebanese restaurant around here gets their hummus very, very smooth, I'll have to ask them how). Then all the classics: tahini, lemon, garlic, S & P. 

    When ready to serve I mix a bit of olive oil with a little sweet paprika. I form a little hole in the center of the hummus dish and make a little pool of that red oil. 
     
  6. scubadoo97

    scubadoo97

    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    13
    Exp:
    At home cook
    My current method is to soak a pound of dried chickpeas for at least 8 hours and the soaking liquid is seasoned with salt and ground cumin.  I pressure cook for about 18 min with natural cool down.  This give me well cooked beans that are soft but not falling apart.  I add the juice of 3-4 lemons as well as some zest, a half a cup of tahini, 2-3 large garlic cloves mashed with salt to form a paste.  First I blend in a BlendTec or Vitamix, the garlic, lemon juice and tahini to emulsify and then add the chickpeas and cooking liquid until I get the consistency I want.  I season with fresh ground cumin and red pepper flakes and continue blending.  Since I know it will firm up after refrigeration I aim for a little looser than I would want in the final product.  The final product is checked for taste and correction made as needed.  I like my hummus a bit tart, I like cumin in it as that's the way I grew up eating it. 

    In my quest to get a smooth hummus I've tried many techniques as well as removing skins.  With high powered blenders skins are no issue.  I get ultra smooth hummus if blended well in a Blendtec or Vitamix
     
  7. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

    Messages:
    7,279
    Likes Received:
    531
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Do you put raw garlic in or roasted garlic?  I've only made classic hummus but looking to amp up the flavors a bit.  A store-bought brand has a wonderful roasted pine nut hummus that I can't wait to replicate.
     
  8. margcata

    margcata Banned

    Messages:
    985
    Likes Received:
    13
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    Hummus, a common Mezze ( small plate ) in the Mediterranean has uncountable variations from country to country. I make this one for lunch quite often and serve with Kalamata olives and oven hot Pita bread.

    Serves 6 to 8 :  ( Note: cumin is used in the Moroccan and North African countries however, rarely used in Greece, Turkey, Jordan or Lebanon ). Cumin is optional, however, if you use it, use it very sparingly )

    225 grams dry chickpeas ( garbanzos ) soaked in water & salt overnight

    the juice of 2 fresh lemons

    150 ml. tahine

    2 or 3 cloves of garlic ( not roasted ) pounded in a Mortar with pestle

    4tblsps. extra virgin Greek or Turkish olive oil ( if unavailable: Use 100% Hojiblanca Spanish Mono Varietal - very delicate )

    Smoked Paprika = pimentón dulce from Spain if possible

    Salt and freshly ground blk pepper

    1) simmer the chickpeas 2 hours until tender however, not overly soft and mushy

    2) strain beans & reserve the beans stock liquid

    3) blend the beans with a little of the bean stock liquid until it becomes a consistent thick pureé

    4) squeeze the lemons and drop by drop put into the hummus dip mixture

    5) place the hummus in a bowl or plate and refrigerate for 2 or 3 hrs.

    6) take the hummus out of refrigerator and mix the rest of the ingredients with the hummus dip and mix until there are no lumps

    7) sprinkle the smoked paprika on top and add a bit of olive oil and finely minced parsley or Spearmint leaf for garnish and serve with olives ( kalamata ) in separate dish and cherry tomatoes and crudities if u wish   

    8) serve with hot pita and a good glass of Santorini White Greek Wine or a fragrant Albariño from Spain or a Prosecco from Veneto or Friuli, Italia
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2012
  9. chefedb

    chefedb

    Messages:
    5,516
    Likes Received:
    174
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    For those who  need to know what Tahine is  It comes already made in a jar and is available in some spermarkets and specialty shops it is a sesamee paste of soughts. You could make your own but doesn't pay. One brand name is Anthros another Roland & Athos there are more.

    PS

    You can save time and steps by purchasing already canned and cooked Garbanzo or chick peas ,It's hard to tell difference of finished product with all that garlic and seasonings.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2012
  10. indygal

    indygal

    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    17
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Pretty pure here, too.

    chickpeas (canned or fresh, I do both depending upon what I have) tahini, lemon, garlic, Olive oil parsley.  But I always add cumin and I don't like it without cumin.  To me, it is like having pasta with no trace of garlic in/on anything.   Has to have cumin.

    I have not been adding paprika, Margcata.  I think I will try that since I like it in most things.

    Now that we've settled that, I'm looking for a really great Greek kibbe recipe. I've had both raw and cooked, and I like both.  Anybody got one????

    Donna
     
  11. scubadoo97

    scubadoo97

    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    13
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Like these?  Never had Greek Kibbe.  I'm from a background of Halabian Jews or Jews from Aleppo so the the ingredients may vary from what some consider standard.  These fried kibbeh do not have meat in the shell like traditional Syrian or Lebanese kibbeh do. Meat in the stuffing for sure.   We use tomato in our kibbeh neyeh.

    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  12. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

    Messages:
    7,279
    Likes Received:
    531
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    I've never put parsley in my hummus, never seen it either.  Is this a norm?

    I've never heard of a kibbe, much less a greek kibbe. 
     
     
  13. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,421
    Likes Received:
    437
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    Kibbe is more of a traditional semitic food. Ground lamb, seasonings and such. There are raw and cooked versions.

    I have to admit, it's something that I've not made or even tried as it seems like  more work than reward. It has a lot of cultural impact though, sort of a comfort/soul food so I probably lack the background to appreciate it properly.
     
  14. tigerwoman

    tigerwoman

    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    38
    that just makes my mouth water.  Any chance you would share some family recipes?
     
     
  15. durangojo

    durangojo

    Messages:
    2,171
    Likes Received:
    89
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    what can i say kk? call me a maverick!

    joey
     
  16. indygal

    indygal

    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    17
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Scubadoo97, Oh yeah!

    Those look great!   I'm with tigerwoman, can you please share the recipes?

    I only said "Greek Kibbe" because I've only had it at Greek restaurants.

    So good drizzled with some EVOO on toasted pita points.

    Donna
     
  17. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

    Messages:
    3,207
    Likes Received:
    155
    Exp:
    Private Chef
    I must say they look good too.

    @ KK : The original recipe calls for tahini but  if you don't have tahini you can use peanut butter. Has anyone ever tried this ? I had to add it when I ran out of tahini once and it had a very nice flavor.

    Petals.
     
  18. margcata

    margcata Banned

    Messages:
    985
    Likes Received:
    13
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    @ Petals,

    Olive oil and the chickpeas, shall form a homogenous pureé dip, even without the Tahine ( sesame ). However, peanut butter, wouldn´t  this create a sweetness atypical to a hummus ?

    Margcata.
     
  19. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

    Messages:
    7,279
    Likes Received:
    531
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    This is definitely something worth trying! 
     
  20. margcata

    margcata Banned

    Messages:
    985
    Likes Received:
    13
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    @ Indygal, Donna,

    Yes, a tiny pinch of cumin is nice too ... just do not enjoy an overpowering amount of cumin -- a lite aroma of it, yes.

    Also, I make a dent in the centre to place the olive oil, extra virgin and I sprinkle the smoked paprika on the top with a very lite sprinkling of the fresh minced parsley.

    I serve it with black Kalamata olives and Machadas which are a broken large dark deep olive green olive from Ciudad Real, in Castilla La Mancha - Spain and some cherry tomatoes with hot Pita.

    I enjoy for a laboral lunch and / or company mezze = appetiser. I have also made Cannelli white bean hummus or rather dip and my dear Cuban friend had given me her black turtle bean one with diced avocado, red onion and fresh corn kernels and instead of cumin, she uses Coriander or " Cilantro herb " very common in Latin American grocers, and place it minced as well as in the dip itself  ... nice too with Corn chips for dipping.

    Margcata.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2012