How do you guys keep hollandaise sauce hot during service?

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Joined Aug 15, 2003
You don't. You keep it warm because if it gets too hot it will split and/or curdle.

You need to just find a warm place to store it. I've seen some people use like a thermos or something along those lines. A water bath works, too...again if it's not too hot.
 
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Joined Jan 19, 2014
On a shelf above the six top.
Yeah..., but for how long and is it a safe temp and do you use pasteurized eggs and...???

I may get flamed for this deservedly, but we cheat and use Knorr's with a dash of Meyer lemon juice and cayenne. We use a lot over an 8 hour shift and just can't keep a true sauce consistently. I find that many, if not most, breakfast-centric places do this.
 
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Joined Sep 26, 2017
I may get flamed for this deservedly, but we cheat and use Knorr's with a dash of Meyer lemon juice and cayenne.
I use Knorr too, but as a different sauce, not as Hollandaise.

I like the taste of it (a lot) but it's milk-based and tastes very different than the real thing.
 
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Joined Aug 7, 2013
We keep it in a 1/6th pan, on the lip of the chargrill. Stir it occasionally to keep a film from developing on the top.
 
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Joined May 5, 2010
Yeah..., but for how long and is it a safe temp and do you use pasteurized eggs and...???

I may get flamed for this deservedly, but we cheat and use Knorr's with a dash of Meyer lemon juice and cayenne. We use a lot over an 8 hour shift and just can't keep a true sauce consistently. I find that many, if not most, breakfast-centric places do this.

What do you consider to be "a lot over an 8 hour shift?" A quart? A gallon? 2 gallons?

If I make the decision to have Hollandaise on my menu, it must be made from scratch.

I have been a lot of places that use the Knorr stuff. I even worked in a DC restaurant that used it. Can you imagine making this sauce with margarine? YUCKO!

I've worked a line with 300=500 covers a night and we had the sauce on our Filets and some fish entrees.
We used real egg yolks. The line cooks knew the recipe by heart and could easily make more, right on the line while service was going on.
To answer your question.....you need to make the sauce several times during service. I use the Thermos. When I go to use a portion, I evaluate how it comes out of the Thermos. If its getting thick and cooling down, it's time for a new batch, whether 2 hours or 1/2 hour...whatever it takes.
 
313
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Joined Jan 19, 2014
What do you consider to be "a lot over an 8 hour shift?" A quart? A gallon? 2 gallons?

If I make the decision to have Hollandaise on my menu, it must be made from scratch.

I have been a lot of places that use the Knorr stuff. I even worked in a DC restaurant that used it. Can you imagine making this sauce with margarine? YUCKO!

I've worked a line with 300=500 covers a night and we had the sauce on our Filets and some fish entrees.
We used real egg yolks. The line cooks knew the recipe by heart and could easily make more, right on the line while service was going on.
To answer your question.....you need to make the sauce several times during service. I use the Thermos. When I go to use a portion, I evaluate how it comes out of the Thermos. If its getting thick and cooling down, it's time for a new batch, whether 2 hours or 1/2 hour...whatever it takes.
Depending on the day, one to two gallons. When we started I insisted on the real thing. Many customers actually complained asking "why did you change the hollandaise?" (Hard to believe I know) We run a 3 person line in very tight quarters and turn 38 seats 8-10 times in 6-7 hours. No way to do the turn we need and keep making sauce every 1 to 2 hours with everything else that must be replenished (bacon, potatoes, etc.) And no margarine in our place.
 
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Joined Sep 5, 2018
Hollandaise doesn't need to be steaming hot to begin with. If you can keep it around 90 degrees it's perfectly fine and won't curdle or break. A thermos works or even in a covered quarter pan on a warm steam table. If you're selling it at any volume you won't need to worry about spoilage and considering most dinner services only last 4 to 5 hours you should be fine. Or you could just use the packaged powder which tends to hold up better at higher temps if quality isn't an issue.
 
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Joined Sep 26, 2017
It's just not safe.

I know it will most likely be fine (definitely not 'perfectly fine' though), but it's against the food safety rules we should all be following.

Without introducing bacteria to it, it will probably safely lasts 5 hours.

But if a dirty spoon happens to come into contact with it, it could turn deadly in that time period.
 
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Joined Aug 7, 2013
Ok, I do it all the time and it's perfectly fine. What's your reasoning for not keeping it at 90 or thereabouts?
I was going to be snarky in this response, but then it occurred to me that you might just lack information.

Science tells us this:

https://www.fda.gov/food/guidancere...yassistanceandtrainingresources/ucm192177.htm

Sure, the occurrence of extreme repercussions might be few and far between, but it is our duty as food professionals to consider our customers and the general population first. If not, where would we get our money from?
 
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Joined Dec 23, 2004
A thermos works well. Don't try to hold it more than two or three hours, not worth it. Overall though I'm kind of over holly, I'd rather do something else.
 
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