How do you do deliveries? [Research question]

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by webbynyc, Sep 27, 2011.

  1. webbynyc

    webbynyc

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    Hi - I am considering starting a food delivery service for restaurants with my local area and I thought this would be a good place to get some insight. Hopefully this is the right place to ask. 

    The idea is to handle all of the delivery logistics of the food delivery process. The restaurant contacts me (via phone or Internet), then I get one of my drivers to pick up and drop off the order to the customer. The restaurant would be charged for each delivery.

    Since most of you have experience dealing with this, I was hoping to get your thoughts. Perhaps you've worked with a similar service or can help me outline any potential issues with my plan? 

    Any guidance you can give would be very much appreciated! This is merely for my own research; don't worry, I have nothing to sell you... yet. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/tongue.gif
     
  2. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    Are you looking at a meal delivery service as an alternative to either take-out or delivery by the restaurant?

    Or are you looking at food delivery to restaurants, along the lines of a vendor aggregator?

    If the former, have you looked at charging the customer rather than the restaurant, after all, the customer receives the benefit?
     
  3. webbynyc

    webbynyc

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    I am looking it from the perspective as a vendor to the restaurant. The restaurant would outsource all of their deliveries to me so that they do not have to hire a delivery person or deal with many of the operational challenges that comes along with doing their own deliveries. The restaurant would of course be able to charge the customer for the delivery (which would offset or cover their fee to me). We wouldn't be a branded service instead were we market to the people ordering the food (a business-to-business service). To the customer point of view, the food is being delivered by the restaurant.

    As I envision it, the only thing the restaurant would need to do is notify us and leave the food in a designated place for my delivery person to pick up (including address and any receipts that need to be signed).
     
  4. greg

    greg

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    I wouldn't use such a service if I were an owner. If a customer has a problem with any aspect of the delivery and they're under the impression that my restaurant had delivered it, I take the hit in reputation, not you. My only recourse would be to stop using your service after the damage has been done. It's entirely possible for those situations to occur if a restaurant is doing the deliveries themselves, but in that case it's at least a mistake made by the restaurant in hiring or training and the restaurant has options for disciplinary actions if the delivery person caused the problem.

    In any event, there are already companies doing this sort of business that market themselves directly to the customer. The customer pays for the service, not the restaurant.
     
  5. chefedb

    chefedb

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    I notice you use nyc in your name if this be New York City, I would say forget-about-it as there are many of these type services there. Your a bit late.
     
  6. webbynyc

    webbynyc

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    I actually wouldn't do this in NYC. I would do it in Jersey City, right across the river from NYC. Lots of high rises there and people don't walk as much.
     
  7. webbynyc

    webbynyc

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    Even with the risks that you outlined, do you think that it is still worth handing off all of the hiring to another company to make your life easier as a manager? 
     
  8. greg

    greg

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    No. The places I work at generally do food that doesn't travel well, so delivery isn't a focus. Even the simplest of foods ( French fries, for example ) don't fare well in delivery, let alone take-out. The majority of upper-echelon restaurants don't do delivery or have delivery personnel, so they're probably not going to pay you when there are already services out there that don't cost them anything. 
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2011
  9. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    For me, a key element of managing is the ability to control those things that may, and can, go wrong, especially when those things have the potential to adversely affect my gross income. Any glitch in deliveries certainly has the potential for disastrous consequences, the least of which is a dissatisfied customer and the worst of which is the loss of my business.

    To consider outsourcing a critical function of my business, I would have to be convinced that the outsource would:
    • Place my customer service objectives as the top priority, and
    • Protect my business reputation, and
    • Provide service equal to or better than I can, and
    • Do it cheaper without losing control