How do you age a steak at home?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by quetex, Nov 3, 2010.

  1. quetex

    quetex

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    Been in the mood for a really good steak. I know a lot of restaurants age their steaks in a walk in cooler but how can the home cook do it properly for best results?

    Should they be vaccum packed or ziplockd or? or not?

    thanks
     
  2. tylerm713

    tylerm713

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    I would think it would be rather difficult to do. However, this website makes it seems quite possible. http://www.askthemeatman.com/is_it_possible_to_dry_age_beef_at_home.htm
     
  3. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Read the article, and have my doubts. What they describe is more like wet aging---the meat spends most of its time in moisture-laden towels.

    But, if you've got a spare fridge, you can do it. Start, as the article says, with a primal. Set the fridge temp to, IIRC, 38F. Hang the meat and leave it be.

    Might make sense to put a drip pan under it, btw.
     
  4. homemadecook

    homemadecook

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    What is the best and easiest way to have an aged steak? 
     
  5. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Vist a very upscale steakhouse. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif
     
  6. babytiger

    babytiger

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    I haven't aged steaks, but have done it for rib roast. I set the roast on a rack, place over a roasting pan and leave that in the fridge for a few days before I cook it. I can't be sure but I think I got the idea from Alton Brown, either on one of his shows or his books.
     
  7. teamfat

    teamfat

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    For me it would be to drive down the road to the Harmon's grocery at the Brickyard.  They have a dry aging cooler with a nice selection of beef in it.  It costs about 2 - 3 times as much per pound as their usual steaks, but I have tried the ribeye and strip steaks and they are tastier.

    Yes, it can be done at home if you've got fridge space to spare.  It won't work with individual steaks already cut, it has to be a big chunk.  Someday when I can afford to buy a $100 hunk of primal I may attempt it myself.

    mjb.
     
  8. mikez

    mikez

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    I saw Alton Brown do this not too long ago.. From the foodnetwork "

    Remove any plastic wrapping or butcher's paper from the roast. Place the standing rib roast upright onto a half sheet pan fitted with a rack. The rack is essential for drainage. Place dry towels loosely on top of the roast. This will help to draw moisture away from the meat. Place into a refrigerator at approximately 50 to 60 percent humidity and between 34 and 38 degrees F. You can measure both with a refrigerator thermometer. Change the towels daily for 3 days

    "

    Best way to cook it? Sear it (does NOT seal in juices) on a cast iron. I like the flip often method better then then flip once method
     
  9. quetex

    quetex

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    Please re-read the question, most good foods are not "easy" compared to cooking at a restaurant that has all the right stuff in their pantries and coolers.

    "Best"? is there really such a thing? If anything humans rarely agree on anything.

    Thanks for the link and replys all, good info.
     
     
  10. quetex

    quetex

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    One of my neighbors used to say, " if you want to cook a good steak, first go "buy" a good steak. Guess my question is because down here in south Texas all the meat markets buy their meats from Benny Kieth or Sysco or other such type company. Even the most expensive ones dont know what they are talking about sometimes so how do you "buy" the good steak in the first place. Thats why i would like to buy the best I can find and make it better if possible. I do like to eat out occassionaly but steaks is not one I like to pay $50.00 for to be dissapointed as I can always make a better steak at home than any retaurant so far. Just want to kick it up a notch, at home.
     
  11. jrock645

    jrock645

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    very very few restaurants use dry aged beef- its prohibitively expensive. Not even steakhouses like BLT, Morton's and Delfriscoes use dry aged beef across the board(they'll occasionally use it for a special, but thats about it). Instead, restaurants that tout their beef being aged usually wet age it- they simply leave it on the shelf in the walk-in in the cryovac packaging it comes in from anywhere from 15-60 days(i've seen more, as well). This results in a more tender steak, but it doesn't develop the flavor as well as dry aging does. Also, wet aging leaves a bit of a bloodier taste to it than dry aged beef does. Personally, I'm not big on aging, unless its dry aged- wet aging just doesn't do it for me. Just stick to good steaks from companies like Buckhead and Allen Brothers, and the aging doesn't matter as much after that.
     
  12. quetex

    quetex

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    Do they sell online?
     
  13. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Go buy a whole strip from Costco.  Clear a spot in your fridge and set it in there for three weeks.  On a rack with circulation of course.  After three weeks cut off the age, cut your steaks and freeze them.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2010
  14. nyfoodie1

    nyfoodie1

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    Hey Home Chef...the best steaks I ever had come from DeBragga.com.  They call themselves New York's Butcher, and I guess that's because they are in the meatpacking district of NYC, but they sell true dry aged beef, and it's outrageously good.  Check it out.
     
  15. nyfoodie1

    nyfoodie1

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    Hey JRock: there is a lot of misrepresentation in the world, but not all companies do that.  There is a BIG difference between true dry aged beef, and the beef that some companies try to pass off as dry aged.  You can tell by pushing against the beef with your finger (just like you tell doneness).  The harder it is, the less age it has. When you've been aging steaks for a century, like DeBragga and Spitler has, you get to know what that dry aged steak feels like, and you know when someone is pulling a fast one.  Good dry aged steak is worth the price, and there are plenty of NYC restaurants that sell them, including Gotham Bar & Grill, Colicchio & Sons and Le Cirque.  BLT did sell true dry aged when Laurent Tourondel was a partner, but since the split, they haven't been buying the same.

    Don't settle for mediocre steaks; if you're having a dry aged steak craving, check out DeBragga.com.  They do it right, and the service is fantastic.
     
  16. jrock645

    jrock645

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    Yeah, I had a dry aged strip at the BLT here in Charlotte(it was the blackboard special when I went), and it was absolutely worth the price. Still can't understand why they au poivre'd it, though.