How Do I Learn To Cook With Molecular Gastronomy?

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Joined May 24, 2009
http://www.cookingissues.com/primers/

Here is a link to a nice blog run by those in charge of the tech department of the French Culinary Institute.  The link will take you to a section of "primers" which will give one a crash course in a few things you may find interesting such as using liquid nitrogen, Transglutaminase, hydrocolloids, etc.  I work in a restaurant that uses much of what you call MG and by my standards the things discussed on this blog are bleeding edge.
 
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Joined Jul 30, 2007
gotta love those  stomach/appetizing appealing terms...transgluminase and hydrocollides...sounds soo yummy!).. just can't compete with fresh basil, and just picked garden tomatoes with garlic and a really good olive oil, or fresh corn on the cob, grilled with a ton of butter....but in fairness and deference, and the proverbial nod to the younger generation, will look up the website, , just for new knowledge and to see what i'm missing in the brave new world...ciao all

joey
 
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Joined May 24, 2009
Everyone starts as a cynic but if you go to the restaurants and see what all the fuss is about you too will not think manipulation is a dirty word.  An August tomato isn't lost on us but for those comfortable with a little bit of science, some extraordinary techniques devised by some brilliant chefs only help to get the best out of those ingredients.

A carrot cooked sous vide tastes more like a carrot

A parsley sauce thickened with ultra tex tastes more like parsley

Ice cream frozen with liquid nitro tastes creamier

Vacuum distilled water can taste like anything you want!  Even dirt!  Without containing dirt.

And as always a change in texture, presentation, appearance, or temperature can make you reappreciate classic flavors.
 
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Joined Apr 17, 2006
Geez Durango, you make it tough. You had to go and bring meatloaf into it. Meatloaf? With mashed potatoes and gravy? How can I refuse? I wasn't trying to stand you up, I just don't see how I'd ever have time to go to Vegas and I didn't want you to die of dehyration. Afraid you're going to disown me anyway, though. My bar manager was asking if I ever heard of "caviar" for drinks, which he wants to try, so I forked up $20 for a MG starter kit for him to play with. I feel like such a traitor. I'll crawl back under my rock now.
 
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thanks grey,

 living in the colorado rockies at 8500 feet, i know hydration...but, but a caviar cocktail...yum...tell me more...2 of my favorite things together! would the actual cocktail be made with caviar, or does caviar mean something else altogether?  i think that bar drinks are the perfect venue for mg, seeing as its already liquid...gotta say, even though it most probably won't ever be my thing, it does sound fun and interesting, and you sound pretty hopped up on it...keep us posted, for sure. just don't turn my meatloaf with mashers and gravy into a drink...i'll  throw something, i swear!...must be a pretty swank place if you're talking caviar in the first place....don't know if this has been done, or if its even possible, but my idea of a perfect martini would be; a large chilled martini glass, wet the rim with a lemon twist and dip the rim in black caviar...fill the glass with very, very cold, very good vodka....good day chef...

joey
 
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Joined Apr 17, 2006
Well, yes Durango. I think a person could use real caviar in a martini. Might try it. The "caviar" I'm referring to though is called that because of how it looks. I know next to nothing about this subject other than you can take any liquid (not sure about oils though) and drop it from a syringe into a solution containing sodium algaenate (extract from algae) and it will form a gelatin-like coating around the liquid. So you could take for instance cherry juice, make the caviar beads with it and put in a chocolate martini. The person drinking it wouldn't get the cherry taste until they bit into the bead. There are other complications regarding Ph that I need to research. I'm not overly hyped, but I'm willing to play. We're not at all a fancy place, just old and established which can be both a benefit and detriment. It slows down a lot in the winter, so we're looking at this as a possible draw as no one else in the area is doing it. There are several other very good established restaurants in this area, so competition is stiff. We're the oldest of the bunch as the business predates the railroad. We ended up being a seafood place because the local Indians used to bring walleye from the Mississippi to trade with the original owners. The place at that time was an inn. We buy our walleye from Canada now, but still sell a ton of it. Therefore, I can't change the place a whole lot and don't really want to. It is what it is, but I try to bring in new things to keep it updated. Check us out at www.hillsidefishhouse.com
 
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Grey,

Your place looks very nice. When you speak of Indians , is there anything sold your way called " steak and cornbread ? " The Mohawks make it in some of their restaurants off the island of Montreal and they are famous for it.(besides theri great baking)

I enjoyed your post.

There is a book called “Petit precis de cuisine moleculaire” by Anne Cazor and Christine Lienard. In the book they use over 20 techniques and have 40 plus recipes. I have made several of them this past year. One thing about MG , it comes across as intimidating maybe because of the preconceived ideas about it but once you have your basic ingredients on hand which are very easy to get, the rest is just sheer enjoyment.

Some of the things that are so easy to make are: Cristal de vent, which is a meringue of mint and anise.

Meringue auvergnate, which is just meringue and d'auvergne blue. (it looks like a cookie)

Sweet yolk,, egg yolks and sugar, this technique involves a few stages using different temperatures but in the end, anyone can make this, including my 7 year old nephew.

Infused tea called : Apple jelly cubes with beet squares, the only things needed are , apple juice, water, beet, earl grey tea, powdered sugar, geletin sheets....its the steps to get there....

Pims Balsam, balsamic vinegar jellied in a chocolate genoise

Bee nest, pearls of honey and camembert cheese.

Huitre coquette, a pearl of raspberry vinegar in an oyster (its a show stopper !)

Shot ball, sphere of apple caramel and vodka, the sphere in round and sits in the shooter glass.

These are just some things.....using a bit of chem to create a dish.  

ps. I am still "old school ".
 
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Joined Apr 17, 2006
Thanks for the info Petals. I have not heard or the steak dish you mentioned. Sounds interesting. I'm sure the Indians in my area had some version of it as they had corn and buffalo and deer. I remember thinking it odd that all the U.S. Indians seemed to make fry bread when their food varied from area to area. Finally I got curious and looked into it. None of them had fry bread until the Government started giving them commodities. They weren't familiar with wheat flour, but oddly enough all did about the same thing with it.
 
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Hi, My name is Shubham and I am from India. I have a civil engineering degree with which I GRADUATED IN 2007. I am 28 years old and willing to change my carrier to food and food sciences because of my deep interest in food and cooking. I am confused and needed your guidance. I am looking for a post graduate course (i.e. masters degree) where I could learn about unconventional methods of cooking, international techniques and practices and food business so that I can make a career in this field. Also I want a degree course where I could combine my scientific temperament with cooking and food. Therefore I am planning for a graduate degree course in molecular gastronomy. But I am not able to find a relevant degree and university. So could you please guide me in this matter also could you please give me some contacts who could guide me .

Please if some one could guide me here or send a PM , it would be a great help. Thank you
 
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