How can I control amount of fat I am serving in each portion of my soup?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by chlorinated, Sep 1, 2011.

  1. chlorinated

    chlorinated

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    What I mean to say is, after I have cooked a soup, each time I serve I just tip the pot over and pour into each bowl.  Unfortunately I notice the first bowl has the highest amount of fat, then the second, then the third etc. With each bowl the taste of fat seems to diminish, I want to avoid this.  I think its because whenever you pour from the pot the liquid at the top is poured in higher proportions then from the rest of the pot.

    Any idea how I can serve so that each time I serve a bowl the amount of fat will correlate more with the amount of meat in the serving? e.g. if i cook 10 pieces of equal meat and serve 2 per bowl, i would like there to be roughly 2 meats worth of fat in each bowl.  Currently i put 2 meats then when i pour it seems half of the total fat goes into the first bowel.

    Many thanks
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2011
  2. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Ask a chemist, or better yet your corner local pharmacist  or even a nutricionist or dietician. Our soups try not to advertise fat content and certainly do not want patron to be able to see it.

    In other words are you for real???????
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2011
  3. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    If you REALLY want equal portions of fat in your soup, chill the soup, remove the fat, weigh the fat, calculate the number of servings of soup you have without the fat, divide the weight of the fat by the number of servings, then portion the fat, then add a portion to a bowl of soup at serving time.

    You could try using as ladle, that is the way most any competently trained cook would do it, albeit without the fat.

    Anyone who has actually gone to a recognized culinary school would not pour soup from the pot into a bowl. (BTW, Chlorinated apparently has clarified that any reference to "culinary graduate" is incorrect, I still have problems with a "high fat soup" and think, perhaps, we have a "failure to communicate" here)
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2011
  4. chlorinated

    chlorinated

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    Yes, I am for real, you should not be so quick to judge.

    For your information, I have a chronic health problem with my gut, every time I eat a food to which I am intolerant I become overly hungry and lethargic and unable to have bowel movements, I must eat large amounts of saturated fat and proteins to get my energy levels back to where they were.  Saturated fat also has a healing effect on my stomach. Therefore it wheather anima fat is good or bad depends on the context.  Read this link for a logical view: http://www.leakygutcure.com/blog/diet/saturated-fat/  , it must be true, because it's working for me.

    The problem in our societies is junk food, denatured food, TRANS FAT, unhealthy lifestyles and the like, not a moderate amount of natural animal fat.  This has worked for man since time began, if you think this is the reason why numerous diseases plague our times, i would say you are blinded from the more likely factors.

    Anyway would be grateful if somebody could answer, it is a cooking technique afterall, wheather you want to apply it or not, well that is your personal choice.

    Thanks
     
  5. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Pouring as you note is not the method for what you want to achieve.  Pete McCracken gave you the best suggestions for getting equal fat into each serving. Even with a ladle you tend to remove more fat early in the portioning compared to later.

    Think of Pete's suggestion for removing the solid fat and portioning it as the garnishing of the soup. In the  pro kitchen a soup is often more assembled before serving than cooked together and served. This is because some things will overcook while being held or the noodles or rice will absorb too much of the broth and lose their proper texture. As well as for portion control. Those are all the same issues you face with how you want your soup to be.
     
  6. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    For a medical condition, you might consider using coconut oil, it is saturated and many have found it beneficial for a number of medical afflictions, from 1-4 tablespoons per day, those could be taken straight or incorporated in a wide variety of dishes.

    One of my past PC clients may be able to assist you at Tropical Traditions , ask for Brian Shilhavy and feel free to mention my name if you are so inclined.
     
  7. chlorinated

    chlorinated

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    Pete, I only saw your comment after my second post, so thanks for that. As regards to the fat issue, i do understand you, when I understand your concerns about the 'possible' health implications of fat, unless you are referring to trans fat, i do not think these are neccesarily true with regards to moderate amounts of animal fat for reasons already outlined.

    "In the  pro kitchen a soup is often more assembled before serving than cooked together and served. This is because some things will overcook while being held or the noodles or rice will absorb too much of the broth and lose their proper texture. As well as for portion control. Those are all the same issues you face with how you want your soup to be"

    Phatch, forgive me didnt quite understand the above statement, could you rephrase your it, what exactly did you mean by "assembled before serving than cooked together and served" in practical terms and how does noodles or soup loosing texture implacate portion sizes?  At the moment I am using a simple beef+salt+water+cauliflower for my soups so I take it whatever you are saying is not affecting my soup.

    Cheers
     
  8. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    A soup in a restaurant often has ingredients put in the bowl and then the rest of the soup/broth added and a few final garnishes to finish.

    Meat or vegetables or noodles might be held separately so they don't overcook or get soggy. When the order comes in, the items are put in the bowl and the proper amount of soup stock/broth added. The soup is assembled to order rather than sitting all together in a pot waiting for orders. The meat was probably cooked in the soup and separated out and held in this example. Do the same with your soup at home.
     
  9. pcieluck

    pcieluck

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    You name the soup, and I can tell you exactly how i'd do it to suit you needs.  Let's take some chicken soup for example.  For chicken soup I make the stock first, then I color and stew chicken legs alone until the meat pulls from the bone. I'll refrigerate the stock and the meat for tomorrow. Skim the fat off the top after it's congealed in the cold.  Vegetables of choice will be cooked a little bit of the skimmed fat, and then finally meat and vegetables added.  I think such a technique would suit what you're trying to do.

    [​IMG]

    Or if you can't wait for the fat to congeal, you can invest in one of these. Since fat floats, and this pours from the bottom, you'll be able to separate most of the stock from the fat.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2011
  10. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Still waiting rfor your answer . What culinary school did you attend.. I notice now you changed your title from culinary student to at home cook?
     
  11. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    No need to beat on him Ed. Time to let go.

    He's just a guy with some unusual beliefs, and there's nothing we can do to help him with what he wants at least not with normal techniques and methods. As far as I know misrepresenting oneself as "culinary student" accidentally or intentionally is neither a crime nor any great sin.

    BDL
     
  12. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    It's a valid question and deserves a valid answer.  But I don't understand why you want to pour soup directly from the pot?  If you use a ladle you will be able assemble your bowl of soup with the exact proportions of ingredients that you wish.  Pouring soup from a pot sounds very messy, impractical, and is the obvious culprit for the problem.
     
  13. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    Quote:
    As is attempting to cook a soup in a single pot with all the ingredients in the same pot for the same time.

    In my experience, a soup is, fundamentally, a seasoned, possibly thickened, stock with appropriately prepared and, possibly, cooked, garnishes, i.e., meat, vegetables, starch(es), as desired.
     
     
  14. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Pete

    . You are right. However she is talking about doing it in the home and you are talking restaurant style. Home everything is in the pot . You and I ladle the soup in the cup or bowl then add the rice, or chicken or whatever.(Garnish)
     
  15. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Yea, soup at home is a one-pot meal.  I make the stock, then portion some off and freeze right away.  The rest gets made into a "soup" which lasts all of 5minutes around here.  Besides, my husband's favorite thing in the world is watching the noodles engorge and take over the whole pot lol!
     
  16. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    Oh my goodness, I've been doing it wrong all these years, and so did my Mother and Grand Mother! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/laser.gifI'll have to look into changing my ways /img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif
     
  17. chlorinated

    chlorinated

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    chefedb, i previosuly mentioned i was not a culinary student, i miselected it when i first registered, i hope we can now leave that in the passed.

    Yes a ladle is the way forward, although the more liquid in the soup the deeper the ladle container should be in order to get good portions.
     
  18. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    I'm not certain that I follow your reasoning...

    If you are looking for fat, why look at soups? In general, most consider soups to be low fat dishes, with certain exceptions.

    What about avocados, cheeses, sausages, in other words high fat foods?

    On an average 2,000 Kcal diet, following USDA guidelines of 40-30-30, you only need 600 calories from fat. At 9 calories/gram, that is just under 70 grams or approximately 2.5 ounces or about 4 1/2 tablespoons/day.

    Two medium avocados, for me, is a lot more tasty than any amount of fat laden soup.

    BTA, WTHDIK