Hot Cross Buns

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by morning glory, Apr 3, 2017.

  1. morning glory

    morning glory

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    I don't know how popular Hot Cross Buns are in the US, but in the UK they are an Easter 'must have'!. I understand that in the US the crosses  on hot cross buns are made from icing. In the UK they are always made from just plain white flour and water. I so much enjoy making these and always mean to make them, 'not just at Easter' but then never get round to it. Do you guys ever make them? This is my failsafe recipe:


    Ingredients

    120 ml semi skimmed milk (room temperature)
    50g melted butter
    500g strong bread flour
    1 tsp salt
    70g caster sugar
    10g Instant yeast
    2 beaten eggs
    125g mixed dried fruit
    2 tsp ground cinnamon
    Luke warm water as required (about 100 ml)
    A little apricot jam heated in the microwave (to glaze)

    For the cross:
    70g plain flour
    70 ml water

    Method
    • Mix the melted butter into the milk. Put the flour, salt, sugar, cinnamon and yeast into a large bowl. Add the warm milk and butter, then eggs. Mix well, adding just enough water to bring the mixture together into a sticky dough.
    • Knead the dough on a floured surface until smooth (about 10 mins). Put the dough in a lightly oiled bowl covered with clingfilm and leave to rise until doubled.
    • Add the dried fruit to the bowl and fold the dough over it. Then knead the dough again on a floured surface until the fruit is well distributed. Leave to rise again until doubled.
    • Divide the dough into 10 pieces. I do this by rolling it into a sausage and then cutting even sized pieces off and shaping them into balls. Place the buns on a baking tray , cover with clingfilm and allow to rise for another hour.
    • Heat oven to 180C. Mix flour and water together for the crosses and then pipe the crosses over the buns. Bake for 20 mins until golden brown.Brush the tops of the buns with the melted jam to glaze.
     
  2. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    ... an annual Easter tradition for me. Plus a tsoureki too.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2017
  3. morning glory

    morning glory

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    Now I have to go and google tsoureki! Know idea what that is! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
  4. summer57

    summer57

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    Yes, Hot Cross Buns are a 'must have' here in Canada, too. I rarely see the icing cross  My grandmother also made hot cross buns, and used your method for the cross, as do I. Thank you for your recipe!  I'll give it a try this year!
     
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  5. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Tsooreki - sweet buttery egg bread flavored with Mahlepi (a kind of cherry pit), mastic (some sort of tree gum), and a bit of citrus rind. Sometimes topped with almond slices but we have a nut allergy in the house. Typically includes a red egg, but I just didn't have time to do that.

     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2017
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  6. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Will be making hot cross buns later in the week!
     
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  7. morning glory

    morning glory

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    Nice plait! I can imagine how good this might be. I know of that cherry pit flavour and its just wonderful. But mastic I've only come across in ice-cream. How much and in what way do you incorporate it into the dough. I do have some in powdered form. The red egg ... it so happens I have some red eggs. They are pickled in beetroot. Would that work?
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2017
  8. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    For 1 loaf I steep 1 tsp mahlepi in simmering water rather than grind and incorporate. This method may not be typical but I get good flavor with no specks in the crumb. The mastic, a chunk between 1/4 and 1/2 tsp per loaded is ground with the sugar. I think the Greeks use a deep red egg... but it's the sentiment and significance that counts more than the color, in my opinion.
     
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