Horseradish - Green Peppercorn Sauce

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by boar_d_laze, Feb 25, 2010.

  1. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    You must try this! 

    Incredibly easy, incredibly simple, and an incredibly good accompaniment to just about any protein.  If there’s a catch, no one’s discovered it yet.   

    It is infinitely variable, allowing scope for whimsical improvisation.  Vary it by taking out the mayonnaise and using all sour cream, or vice versa.  Or, replacing the mayonnaise with whipped cream.  Or, using all whipped cream.  Or, you could leave out any one of the three flavor components – green pepper corns, mustard and horseradish – and just go with two.  Or, even just one.  Or, using different mustards.  Or, pink peppercorns.  Or, adding hot pepper.  Or adding hot sauce – Sriracha, Habanero, Chipotle, you name it.  Or exchanging the parsley for herbes de Provence for chicken, or tarragon for fish.  Or, ...

    You get the idea.

    Note:  The sauce feels like something you can throw together while the meat is resting.  And, indeed you can.  But the doing the “do-ahead” aspects ahead really does make things better.


    HORSERADISH - GREEN PEPPERCORN SAUCE


    Quantity:     More Than Enough for 2 – the recipe is easily multiplied
    Difficulty:      Not very
    Time:            Seconds only, but best if you can give it an hour for the flavors to coalesce

    Ingredients:

        •    1 tbs green peppercorns, or to taste
        •    1/4 cup mayonnaise
        •    2 tbs sour cream
        •    1 tbs Dijon, or 1 or 2 tsp  hot mustard, or to taste
        •    1 or 2 tsp fresh, grated horseradish, or to taste
        •    1 pinch salt
        •    2 tsp minced parsley (omit for beef and lamb)

    Shopping Note: Green peppercorns are sold two ways – dry or in a liquid brine.  Brined pepper will help you make this recipe more quickly and easily, but most stores don’t give you the choice.  Don’t make yourself nuts shopping around for peppercorns packed in brine, as will be explained, you can brine the dried ones yourself.

    Brine (if necessary):
        •    3/4 cup water
        •    1 tsp (optional) distilled vinegar
        •    2 tsp table salt
       
    Technique:

    Note: There are some “do ahead” aspects to this which can make a big difference in the ultimate quality of the sauce. 

     If you’re using dry green peppercorns (see, I told you), measure 3/4 cup hot tap water into a measuring cup, and mix in the vinegar and salt.  Place the peppercorns in a small bowl, and cover them with the brine.  Soak long enough to soften the peppercorns.  1 hour is more than enough.   

    Meanwhile, mix the remaining ingredients – excepting the herbs – in a small bowl.  If using horseradish (you should, you should!), you’ll want to give the sauce a few minutes for the horseradish and salt to marry with the other ingredients.  So, cover with cling wrap and refrigerate for at least one hour.

    Taste the sauce, and adjust for horseradish by either adding more or by adding more mayonnaise.  Drain the green peppers, and mix them in.  If using, mix in the herbs. Taste again.  You don’t want this salty, but if necessary, adjust for salt.  

    The above recipe is my original creation.  If you wish to share it you have my permission to do so as long as you credit it to me, Boar D. Laze.  I'd consider it a kindness if you would also mention my website, www.cookfoodgood.com where this recipe is also posted.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2010
  2. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Interesting that this got so many views but no responses.  Is it just boring -- everybody does it.  Univeral approbation -- so what's the point?  Room temperature sauces on meat are for barbarians and I an't no stinkin' barbarian.  Or, what?

    BDL
     
  3. oldpro

    oldpro

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    Since I like all of the ingredients, I can't imagine that I won't try this.  Have you ever made it with prepared horseradish?  My experience with fresh horseradish is that the heat is inconsistent. 
     
  4. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    BDL -Many thanks for the post. 

    It's a beautifully peppery sauce.  This type of sauce and its variations are very much used in our household.  Personally, I don't use the green peppercorns- they, to me, don't add flavour, I prefer ground fresh black peppercorns or in some instances, ground white pepper, and I don't brine -ain't got dat much patience /img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif  If I want a visual seeded look, I'll use whole grain mustard.  Very often here  it'll be made with greek yoghurt and just a tad of soured cream.

    It does go deliciously with so many things.  Even on a tomato, cucumber, jalapeno and spring onion salsa. Or even just halved cherry tomatoes.  Let is sit a few hours if you can, stir before serving, so very nice.  And this sauce keeps a few days too- its a bonus-make twice as much as you need on Monday, use the rest on Thursday, for example..  I love it with corned beef and mashed potato.

    P,S,  Oldpro, Can't get fresh horseradish here, so I use the commercial horseradish cream.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2010
  5. maryb

    maryb

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    I haven't commented because I haven't tried it :lol: making it tonight to go with a bison ribeye.
     
  6. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Mary darling,

    Let me know, please.  Bison ribeye sounds delicious.

    BDL
     
  7. maryb

    maryb

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    Very tasty, I have some leftover and I think it may find its way onto a summer sausage sandwich for lunch tomorrow./img/vbsmilies/smilies/rollsmile.gif
     
  8. bubbamom

    bubbamom

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    I had trouble printing the recipe and couldn't seem to find it on your website.  Having said that, I copied it to WP and it printed just fine.

    Plan to try it later this week when I'll be making some tenderloins.
     
  9. french fries

    french fries

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    I'm just being curious: why no parsley if the sauce accompanies beef? 
     
  10. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    FF,

    Sorry to respond to you so tardily, I missed your post.

    You can certainly use parsley if you like.  It won't add much in the way of flavor profile, will have a tendency to "mellow out" the horseradish, and will definitely add some color.    

    BDL
     
  11. french fries

    french fries

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    No problem! Better have a late answer than no answer! Thanks BDL.
     
  12. skatz85

    skatz85

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    sounds pretty good i had a version of that sauce in class he served it over seabass i believe, heavy cream mustard and horseradish. it was really tasty. i love horse radish, i wonder if using the purple horse radish(horseradish with addition of beet juice) would add more color and flavor cause i like that taste better..
     
  13. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Originally Posted by skatz85  

    Certainly worth a shot -- and since you're thinking fish, maybe you could add some pink pepperconrs and a (very) little tarragon.  Anyway, try it in whatever way it seems best to you.  And, by all means, let us know how it looks and tastes.

    BDL