Honing/steeling options

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by Jedicat94, Feb 14, 2018.

  1. Jedicat94

    Jedicat94

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    Wow. Sounds like I chose excellent steel to begin this journey with. Well, c'est la vie...
    Can I even detect the enemy with naked eye then?
     
  2. benuser

    benuser

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    It will fold or break after board contact. That's how you recognise.
     
  3. rick alan

    rick alan

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    The worst burr former I have encountered is a defective Shun I have, HT near the tip was apparently screwed up during the sharpening/buffing process. The thickness of the wire edge it produces is beyond believing. It looks perfectly debuured untill you make a few cuts with it, then the heavy sucker rolls to the right, and always to the right.

    The only way of dealing with it is to sharpen, deburr with longitudinal strokes, then micro-bevel. Then, use it till it rolls again, deburr, sharpen without going far enough to raise a burr, and microbevel again. After 3 or 4 tries at this it will finally take a stable edge. Trick from there is not to sharpen to a burr formation, because when you do that you have to begin the cycle all over again. Fortunately I only use this knife for slicing, and I guess largely I've kept it for the challenge.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2018
  4. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

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    More like Chef's Choice electric sharpener. LOL. I sharpen everything with it; except for my carbon steel, powdered steel, and traditional Japanese knives, which I use stones.

    By the way, I did not know that a perfect angle is the cause of the wire edge. Thank you for the info.

    This means that only one of my sharpeners produce a perfect angle. I used to think that this one sharpener is defective, because I almost always get a wire edge when using it. Turns out it's the complete opposite of what I thought!

    Lucky, I have no problem with my Shun's.
     
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  5. benuser

    benuser

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    Two tricks to avoid a wire edge when hand sharpening:
    Increase the angle a bit when going through the progression.
    When deburring on the coarser stones, strop first the clean side to make sure all debris are with the burr.
    After sharpening on a 400 I don't yet strop and deburr on that very same, but do it on the next, 800. I want to preserve a bit of the scratch pattern. But before deburring by longitudinal strokes, so along the edge, I strop on split leather with the other side. At this stage don't worry about rounding the edge.
     
  6. benuser

    benuser

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    I forgot the most important: you raise a burr only once, with a coarse stone, say a 400. So you know that the bevels met. After that, the burr will appear by itself, after one or two strokes, whether you can feel it or not. No effort needed, believe me, the burr is there, and the bevels still meet.
    You can't completely deburr on a medium stone. You only make it much smaller. It's still there, and when stropping and deburring doesn't reduce it any further, and it only flips, it's time to go to the next stone. And not before.
     
  7. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

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    What is the reason behind stropping and deburring in the middle of your sharpening progress? What benefits do you get?

    I mean, when I sharpen on the stones, I just flip my knife over once the burr forms and move to a finer stone when the burr forms again, and I repeat this until the final stone. That's when I deburr and then strop.
     
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  8. benuser

    benuser

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    I don't want the burr to come off in an uncontrolled way, leaving a ragged edge behind, and have its remnants interfere with building a smooth edge.
     
  9. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

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    Interesting. I never saw that as a potential problem before.

    I shall try it your way next time and see if there's any differences.

    I always aim for the best edge I can get, but at the same the, I want to get it in the quickest possible way.

    Not that I'm not patient, I'm just lazy. LOL.