Honing and sharpening tools for Zelite?

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by Adam Clowes, Jan 21, 2018.

  1. Adam Clowes

    Adam Clowes

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    Hi all

    I have purchased a Zelite comfort pro (Rockwell 56) and wondered if anyone could recommend tools for honing (diamond/ceramic/both) and sharpening (how essential is a whet stone) and how frequently I should use them?


    It will likely only get light use and I am somewhat a novice when it come to these matters.


    Could anyone kindly advise?
     
  2. benuser

    benuser

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    Soft Krupp 4116 I guess. I would treat it as a Victorinox: medium-coarse stone only -- I use a Chosera 400, deburring with green ScotchBrite sponge, maintenance on a 800 or so. Some will suggest steeling, but the effect is very, very short as you basically rebuild an edge from fatigued steel that has failed and is more than likely to fail again. A ceramic rod is better as it takes away the fatigued steel, but its use is far from simple and one has to be familiar with sharpening basics in order to properly deburr. I like the Sieger LongLife. But any rod is an emergency solution, better use a stone.
     
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  3. Adam Clowes

    Adam Clowes

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    That's great info but with me being fairly new and unversed in the arts of honing and sharpening which solution would you recommend? Many thanks.
     
  4. Adam Clowes

    Adam Clowes

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    Also, how good is Soft Krupp 4116? I paid £40 for this knife and wondered if I payed too much?
     
  5. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Krupp 4116 has been a mainstay of German (and other) knives that has been successfully used by both professionals and home cooks for years. You didn’t pay too much. It’s just not Japanese; that’s why it gets so maligned by Japanese knife enthusiasts. There are merits and pitfalls to both approaches to cutting food.
     
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  6. benuser

    benuser

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    I would get one medium-coarse stone like the Chosera / Naniwa Professional 400, and get rid of the factory edge ASAP. They are generally poor. Your own edge should considerably improve both performance and edge retention. Don't wait for the factory edge getting blunt. For honing you may try cardboard.
    A good reading would be Chad Ward's An Edge in the Kitchen.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2018
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  7. benuser

    benuser

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    Price is indeed OK, certainly taking prices in Britain into account.
     
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  8. Adam Clowes

    Adam Clowes

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    So is a rod for honing always necessary?
     
  9. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Many find them useful. But necessary, probably not if you are honing on a stone or cardboard or some other strop material.
     
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  10. Adam Clowes

    Adam Clowes

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    Would these be of use?

    https://uk.knivesandtools.eu/en/pt/-wusthof-ceramic-sharpener.htm



    Many thanks
     
  11. benuser

    benuser

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    In a hectic pro environment, using leather or a stone is inconvenient if not impossible. That's why I called a rod an emergency solution.
    At home there's is no need for a rod.
     
  12. benuser

    benuser

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  13. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    I use a similar ceramic rod on German knives. In my experience, that rod is very fine for use with that steel. A quick hone before use. If the knife is dull enough that a quick hone is insufficient then it needs to be resharpened on stones. Neither a ceramic or steel hone can replace sharpening when a knife gets dull.

    I’ve not had any experience with diamond hones like the one you linked.
     
  14. benuser

    benuser

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    It's no diamond rod, it's a very fine ceramic one. A diamond rod eats steel, and leaves a very coarse edge. Not for daily or weekly maintenance, and certainly not as a replacement of real stone sharpening, on a coarse stone, to re-establish a good geometry.
    Please be aware that all that work on the very edge only will rapidly thicken the area right behind it. Just as electric sharpeners do. With every sharpening you move the edge a -- very -- little bit towards the spine. Immediately behind the edge the blade is some 0.2mm thick. At 5mm from there probably 0,5mm; at 10mm thickness will be some 10mm.
    With the same edge being reproduced performance will get lost due to the thickness behind the edge which will go increasing.
    [​IMG]
    That's why good sharpening starts behind the edge, not at the edge.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2018
  15. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Yes, The rod in the knivesandtools.comlink is ceramic.

    The ceramic “stone” in the Amazon link is diamond unless I misunderstand their description. Quote:

    • DC4 Diamond ceramic whetstone
    • Dimensions: 7 x 32 x 100 mm
    • Consist of a fine diamond stone (25 micron) and a very special ceramic stone, made of synthetic sapphires
    • Weight: 65 g
    ... and I completely agree on the issues associated with diamond sharpeners of any kind. Used one once a long time ago but never since...
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2018
  16. benuser

    benuser

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    Thanks, Brian, my fault indeed. And a novice sharpener better stays away from these diamond stuff, and others better use them only for thinning far behind the very edge...
     
  17. Adam Clowes

    Adam Clowes

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    When you say that rod is fine - do you mean it's okay/good or have I misunderstood? Is the Chosera 800 a better choice bearing in mind my beginner status?
     
  18. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    I should have been more clear in my statement... I personally think a ceramic honing rod is good to have and use.