Homecooks and gallantines

7,375
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Joined Aug 11, 2000
I'm in the middle of "love and kisses and a Hale of Truffles" by James Beard/Helen Evans Brown

James and Helen were writing an article on picnic foods for Colliers magazine...James Beard suggested a turkey gallantine boned out take the thigh and leg meat and a little of the breast and cut it into strips along with tongue and ham.. Farce meat of pork and veal and chicken breast with spice. Arrange the strips randomly slice a truffle and pistachio nuts. Roll, tie and sew...wrap in cloth and poach in a broth of veal bone , calf foot and carcass of a bird. wrap weight and cool... Cover in the broth to jell.

When confronted by a Home Show Chef saying it took him 4 hours and noone could do it without a demo....James Beard said,"I am sick of thinking the American housewife is dumb. She can do anything if she wants to and the reason she doesn't is because too many of you think everything has to be done for her. I know plenty of people who learned to make a galantine without a demonstration. After all if you can read and know cooking there is nothing you can't achieve."
March 2, 1956

Thoughts?
 
4,508
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Joined Jul 31, 2000
I have to think about this one.
Very thought provoking.
I'll get back after I digest the whole thing.
cc
 
7,375
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Joined Aug 11, 2000
It's pretty advanced stuff....boning out a bird making a farcemeat and seasoning it then wrapping, sewing and poaching it in a stock then weighting and cooling then jelling .....all in all it's not done much today. It's more labor intensive that just a pate. I was pretty impressed that he wrote that. A couple of years ago I spoke up at a Trends Culinary Group and said I would not dumb down my recipes because newspapers or "experts" said there should only be 5 ingrediants.....sorry I don't work that way....and I refuse to lower my standards and treat people and in essence food in that way. (I taught my severely challenged child to make strudels by age 4)
 
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Shroomgirl, Thank you for sharing that with us.
Are we talking about making a galantine or are we talking about the capability of people to learn...I think many people are born with a natural talent to learn,and I feel that many people need the visual,nurturing guidance to succeed. I believe everyone can learn, I also believe that the nature of learning is inherent..some find it fun,some find it a challenge and some find it a nuisance
Tell me and I will forget.
Show me and I will remember.
Involve me and I will learn and succeed
Does any of this make any sense?
cc
 
2,938
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Joined Mar 4, 2000
Yeah, I guess my first shot at anything won't be nearly as nice as it ought to be, but given clearly written direction, it is do-able. However, I agree with capechef, a picture is worth a thousand words.
 

isa

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I like the way James Beard think. And CC you are right, to learn you have to do it yourself. I never made galantine or boned a chicken but would love to learn.
 
4,508
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Joined Jul 31, 2000
Sisi ,Do you have la Techinique By jacques pepin?
Or I can take a speed train up north and give you a quick lesson
cc
 
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Joined Dec 8, 1999
Glad you caught it, Missy. I believe misspelling "trivial", especially when used in the context of bragging over the thrashing of someone in Trivial Pursuit, is one of the many definitions of irony.

P.S. you misspelled misspell


[This message has been edited by Greg (edited 01-06-2001).]
 
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Joined Jul 18, 2000
umm, some of you guys dont know what a galantine is?.

Its a very easy type of food to make and should make up the basic repitoire. I can understand the average housewife not understanding this method.

This should be one of the first things (and usually is) that a trainee chef should learn.

If you're not taught such a technique in your schooling, i think that you should question the schools curriculum.
 
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Joined Aug 12, 2000
I boned my first chicken and made galantine from a book, though I don't know if I would recommend learning all the steps of a complex preparation at the same time. People are too timid, they have no self confidence. You hear all the time, "I can't do that, I'm not talented," when in actuality they could do it right the first time with a good set of directions and the proper tools. (Oh, yes, they have to be willing to follow the directions, too.) Everything is a learned skill, and while some people have the talent to move on into the range of artistry, anyone with instructions and a good knife can bone out a chicken.

By the way, when Capechef and Sisi get together, let me know, maybe we can have a North Atlantic Coast party somewhere, like those people in Chicago are doing.
 
7,375
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Joined Aug 11, 2000
I was impressed that James Beard wrote it in the first place, amazed that they would consider that for a household magazine for an article on picnic foods. And then totally shocked and dismayed because it hit home (again) how far we've gone in home cooking. I teach in several forums and a galatine is really advanced stuff....NOW>
I don't know anyone that is making them professionally much less teaching....even pates seem to have gone by the wayside (not in restaurants but classes)

Just thinking of the statis of cooking in America.
I agree with Katherine and CC. If I watch and particpate then I learn...takes longer without pics or a guide.
Desire and curiosity are what guide the passion of cooking.....
 
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Blueribboncakes,
I appreciate your insight and your passion to cook. I think that there are many levels of talent in the home kitchen, But I applaud anyone that takes the time and puts in the effort to create and nurture there family,there by nurturing oneself. It's funny when my wife and I we're first married we had a nice little Apt, With a undersized stove/oven. I think I made some of my best meals in that Kitchen. Life is about challenges and adaptability. Hey Blue,Just don't cook to good, I need my job

cc
 

isa

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Joined Apr 4, 2000
CC,

No I don't have La Technique. Wish I did. I don't know why they don't reprint this book.

As to your offer to come down north, why not. Try to come in February though, there will be a food festival. Chefs from all over the world will be in town giving demonstration and cooking at various restaurants. That way you could kill two birds with one stone, so to speak.
 
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Craig Claiborne's New York Times International Cookbook has a recipe for a turkey gallantine. It is a long recipe, but doesnt' look beyond an experienced home cook who has patience and the sense to have the mis en place attended to. If a proper occasion arose, and I had the time to do it, I'd go for it. I have 5 James Beard Cookbooks and now I know why I love that guy! When I'm trying something new and I consult several sources to check methods, it's his I use when in doubt. So sorry he's gone...
 
7,375
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Joined Aug 11, 2000
If you havn't read this book, check it out...it is a wonderful compliation of letters he wrote during the 50-60's and they are amazing in scope....Boy did he have some voluptous meals!!! And the energy and travels this man had were phenominal.

That's probably why the James Beard House and foundation were formed....he just reached so many people, loved good food and did not dumb down his recipes.
 

isa

3,236
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Joined Apr 4, 2000
Shroomgirl,

Could you please tell me from what book is the article you mention?
 
7,375
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Joined Aug 11, 2000
Sorry I was going by memory it's
James Beard (top of book)

Love and Kisses and a Halo of Truffles
letters to Helen Evans Brown
edited by John Ferrone
Arcade Publishing
1994

ISBN 1-55970-264-8
 

isa

3,236
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Joined Apr 4, 2000
Thanks. I thought that was the name of the article. Couldn't find any book by that title at the store in town.
 

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