Home made duck confit

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by Guest, May 25, 2012.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Hello my culinary brothers ands sisters...

    I just had 10 frozen duck legs delivered, I'm thinking duck confit for my lovely wife...anybody got an old school bullet-proof method they love??
     
  2. chefross

    chefross

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    I really enjoy confit. I try to get duck fat that comes in tubs.

    I heavily salt both sides of the legs and allow them to sit overnight in the fridge.

    After rinsing and patting dry. I place them in a heavy roasting pan. add cloves of garlic, fresh thyme, and lots of freshly ground black pepper.

    I melt the duck fat and pour this over the duck legs until they are all covered.

    The pan then goes into a 230-245 degree oven uncovered.

    It usually takes about 3-4 hours for the cooking time ( of course this depends on how many there are to the pan)

    After cooking, I allow the confit to cool in the fat.

    From this point on, the duck legs can stay in the fridge for up to 6 months or more as long as they are submerged under the fat.

    Save the fat and use it again and again. The more uses, the more flavor is developed in the fat.
     
  3. cape chef

    cape chef

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    For my cure I use kosher salt, parsley, thyme, peppercorns, bay leaves and a pinch of tcm.I use about a half once per leg & cure for 24 hours. Rinse, dry and cook in the fat. A couple things I do differently than chefross I don't add anything to the fat and I never let the fat get above 190f. I find doing it covered in my oven works best.The last batch I did took 6 hours.Then like chefross said,mature the confit in the fat in the fridge. It is important to leave the duck "jelly"behind as it shortens the life of the fat. Below is confit I did a couple weeks ago during a "chef test" that actually landed me a new gig as chef for a vineyard

    [​IMG]
     
  4. chefedb

    chefedb

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    I try and have mine stay in fridge at least 3 to 4 weeks if possible.
     
  5. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Cape Chef and ChefRoss, I have to laugh as I just pulled out the recipe I used to use regularly for Duck Confit, and it literally splits the difference between both of your recipes.  I mix kosher salt with crushed bay leaf, fresh thyme and coarsely ground black pepper.  I don't measure out the cure but coat the legs liberally in the salt mixture.  Allow it to cure overnight.  Rinse, dry and cover with duck fat.  Add a healthy handful of garlic (more as a treat for us cooks than any other reason!!!) and cook in a 225°F oven until done (about 4-5 hours).  It's a recipe I know by heart but as it split the difference between you two I had to check it out to make sure I was remembering it correctly.  It's been about 7 years since I last made it.  Need to make some, at home, for me and the wife!
     
  6. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Cape, what is the "TCM" mentioned in your post???  And please elaborate on 'leaving behind the duck jelly'.  Inquiring minds want to know.
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2012
  7. cape chef

    cape chef

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    TCM = Tinted Curing Mix = Prague powder #1. It's basically sodium chloride and a small % of sodium nitrite.It's tinted pink. It's use in the curing process of many meats like corn beef, smoked hams,tasso, sausages etc.Very little is used per pound of cure and should not be confused with #2 which is used in air curing/drying, like prosciutto ham and dry sausages.It helps prevent rancidity in fat & foods

    The "duck jelly" I referred to are the juices that settle to the bottom of your duck fat as you cook your confit and congeal as it cools.It shortens the life of your fat by affecting the hermetical seal
     
     
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest

    So a new twist...My wife has decided that this Saturday is the date for confit, so my post is more timely then I thought it would be...

    I'm thinking salting and curing (kosher salt, bay leaf, fresh thyme, coarsely ground black pepper as suggested) today, cooking Wednesday at 200F for 5-6 hours, then chilling until Saturday night. Thinking duck fat skillet potatoes and a arugula salad, David Bruce Pinot to wash it down...
     
  9. Guest

    Guest Guest

    So I used a bit of everyone's ideas, I did a 30 hour fridge cure of thyme, garlic, kosher salt, bay leaves and small bit of rosemary, then slow roasted today at 220F for 6 hours (see attached photo) and refridgerated.

     [​IMG]

    Will cook tomorrow to crisp, planning to start with arugula salad with raspberry balsamic dressing, then serve with whipped garlic mash and green beans... 
     
  10. chefzoneau

    chefzoneau

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    Looks great Mike your wife is a lucky lady :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2012
  11. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Aussie Aussie Aussie...Oy Oy Oy...is that great place on the water in Hobart still selling Gummy shark as Flake and Chips??? I loved that place....