Home kitchen startup

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by kthull, Mar 8, 2003.

  1. kthull

    kthull

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    Just curious if any of you who are running your own shops have used your home kitchens for commercial purposes when getting started. It's not allowed where I live, but I know of people who do it anyway. Curious about your thoughts on that as well.

    My desserts have the interest of quite a few people locally, but I don't have the capital or the guts (yet) to make the leap.

    Thanks.
     
  2. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Professional Pastry Chef
    Aside from it being illegal in most instances, it is unfair to competitors who pay overhead. Save yourself possible legal troubles, and make your stuff in a legal kitchen.:chef:
     
  3. kthull

    kthull

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    A legal kitchen has been in my plans since learning it was not allowed in Illinois. I was just blown away talking to people who either did not know, or did know but still did it anyway.
     
  4. w.debord

    w.debord

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    Just to update.....I've discovered thru private messages that Kevin and I live very close to each other. So I might as well post here instead of thru private messages.

    Kevin, just wondering who you've talked to local........seeing that I've done similar. I can tell you (some what) who's a good lead and who says their interested to everyone....then wants to buy even below your costs.

    It's harder to sell illegal (not that I'm condoneing that) to established businesses then to sell to individuals. Businesses need you to have insurance before they can buy from you. I think your going to run into many walls being illegal.

    But hey, I have the same goals and dreams so it's fun to meet another on the same path.
     
  5. kthull

    kthull

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    Wendy, first I want to say thanks for your very valuable input. This is definitely a person to person industry and it helps to know I've got truly great support in all the wonderful people in this forum.

    I haven't actively sought people/places out yet. Right now, I'm dabbling to see where my specialties are. So far cheesecakes and mousses. The higher end stuff holds more interest for me and at the same time seems like it could have more profitability. I also find candymaking (chocolates) intriguing. I've played with truffles and wanted to test out chocolate buttercreams, but my wife put us on a diet, which has delayed things a bit.

    My neighbor, who gets the brunt of my experimentation, is connected to a restaurant and caterer, so she seems like a likely inroad. Her mother owns Coopers in Gilberts and the one on Randall in Lake in the Hills (I think) and she also expressed interest in my desserts "whenever I'm ready."

    So it's all an encouraging start. I've also noticed there are some really low quality bakeries in the area, which also fueled my fire a bit. But I haven't really roamed the marketplace for a couple years now, so who knows what's out there now.

    Another idea I had hoped to take a stab at was online sales. I've been dabbling at Web development on the side (so much to do, so little time).

    So many ideas running through my head that it's hard to pin them all down, but I do realize the other point you made: profitability would be tough. Rent at some small local storefronts prices out at near $4000 a month, plus utilities. That's an awful lot of cheesecakes to sell!

    Thanks again for all your help.
     
  6. anna w.

    anna w.

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    Just a note from someone who does do it legally out of the home to the end consumer only- if you are planning to sell wholesale be legal. It is not worth the trouble to run a business like this illegally. One claim of food poisoning and you are done (either in a settlement or legal fees). It is also unbelievably painful to work out of the same kitchen your family has to eat out of. So much so that we are buying a new house that would allow me a separate bakery in the basement. One of the options that we looked at was buying a two family home in a residential/commercial area and converting one side into a commercially legal bakery. Is this something you might possibly be able to do? This option was the cheapest possibility outside of having another kitchen in the home.
     
  7. kthull

    kthull

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    Hi Anna.

    I have thought about a residential/commercial home as there are many "Main Street" communities in the area. Unfortunately, I'm not ready to uproot my children at this point. Seems like that would have been a great opportunity in hindsight. Great suggestion though.

    Thanks.